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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 1241

post #18601 of 19909

When I took a new NMWA/Formosa jacket in for buttonholes, I saw that the tailor (Andreas Gorges) had a book of what looked exactly like Drapers Airy Hopsack:

 

 

Anyone have any knowledge of Mirage or Giordano Basso?

 

Also, for @Isolation, I took a pic of a brown fabric that could make a nice sport coat. It was in a VBC flannel book, but it looks kind of hopsacky, and the label says Loro Piana.

 

post #18602 of 19909
There are a lot or merchants in Italy that put together their own selection to sell to tailors. The most famous are Drapers and Caccioppoli now, but there's plenty other smaller ones. All those airy hopsack are probably made by VBC or another large mill - maybe with different specs / yarns, maybe not.
post #18603 of 19909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinjango View Post

The silk/linen is amazing. Any chances of making it with a warmer hue?

No plans at the moment, but I'm working on navy and olive versions.
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

Anyone have any knowledge of Mirage or Giordano Basso?

@DavidLane has a hopsack jacket from that same Mirage book.
post #18604 of 19909
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

No plans at the moment, but I'm working on navy and olive versions.
@DavidLane has a hopsack jacket from that same Mirage book.

Olive? Any timelines? I mean would be great if it would be for next summer.
post #18605 of 19909
Speaking of Olive - has anyone had something in olive Solaro made up? I saw a great looking suit in olive Solaro in a small shop in Modena last week
post #18606 of 19909
Quote:
Originally Posted by gs77 View Post

Olive? Any timelines? I mean would be great if it would be for next summer.

Samples should be ready by start of next spring. I'm working on some tweeds for fall/ winter right now, but still trying to find the right quality/ mill.
post #18607 of 19909
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Samples should be ready by start of next spring. I'm working on some tweeds for fall/ winter right now, but still trying to find the right quality/ mill.

Thanks. Good to know. Don't get me wrong, I'm not criticizing, but that might mean the cloth can't be worn before spring 2018...
post #18608 of 19909
Quote:
Originally Posted by gs77 View Post

Thanks. Good to know. Don't get me wrong, I'm not criticizing, but that might mean the cloth can't be worn before spring 2018...

Not at all, I appreciate the feedback. I was talking to someone else about this today, actually.

So, production time is 3-4 months. I'm not sure I can cut that down much since that's how long it takes to produce the fabric. Most people, I think, use traveling tailors, which is 9-12 month turnaround (assuming three fittings, bespoke, etc). That means a minimum of 12 months turnaround from when people order their fabrics (meaning, the soonest they can wear their commission). At most 16 months, depending on their tailor's schedule.

If I rework samples so that they're anti-cyclical (meaning, fall fabrics are announced in spring; spring fabrics are announced in fall), that means people will still have to wait until the following season to wear their commissions, no? So, if new colors of the silk/ linen are shown Sept/ Oct 2016, people would get their silk/ linen suits and sport coats in winter of 2017. Which means they can wear it spring of 2018. Seems like the same outcome in the end, except that it's a little counter-intuitive to run spring fabrics in fall, and fall fabrics in spring.

I could be wrong on all this. It was just brought to my attention today, so I'm working through this in my head as I'm typing. Let me know if I'm wrong.

Of course, if someone is using a local tailor, this schedule is completely turned around. But I assume that's not the case for most subscribers (just an assumption).
post #18609 of 19909

That seems right, and I appreciate the conversation, but really I just need that Kylnadrochit tweed, man.

post #18610 of 19909
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Not at all, I appreciate the feedback. I was talking to someone else about this today, actually.

So, production time is 3-4 months. I'm not sure I can cut that down much since that's how long it takes to produce the fabric. Most people, I think, use traveling tailors, which is 9-12 month turnaround (assuming three fittings, bespoke, etc). That means a minimum of 12 months turnaround from when people order their fabrics (meaning, the soonest they can wear their commission). At most 16 months, depending on their tailor's schedule.

If I rework samples so that they're anti-cyclical (meaning, fall fabrics are announced in spring; spring fabrics are announced in fall), that means people will still have to wait until the following season to wear their commissions, no? So, if new colors of the silk/ linen are shown Sept/ Oct 2016, people would get their silk/ linen suits and sport coats in winter of 2017. Which means they can wear it spring of 2018. Seems like the same outcome in the end, except that it's a little counter-intuitive to run spring fabrics in fall, and fall fabrics in spring.

I could be wrong on all this. It was just brought to my attention today, so I'm working through this in my head as I'm typing. Let me know if I'm wrong.

Of course, if someone is using a local tailor, this schedule is completely turned around. But I assume that's not the case for most subscribers (just an assumption).

I understand. I didn't know that majority of people use remote tailors.
I am using a local tailor, I like the results, love to support local artisans, plus I somehow can't get my head around planning a year ahead what I'm gonna wear :-)

For example, first fitting for the suit made of your run of navy houndstooth fresco should happen next week ...
post #18611 of 19909
Quote:
Originally Posted by gs77 View Post

I understand. I didn't know that majority of people use remote tailors.
I am using a local tailor, I like the results, love to support local artisans, plus I somehow can't get my head around planning a year ahead what I'm gonna wear :-)

For example, first fitting for the suit made of your run of navy houndstooth fresco should happen next week ...

I suppose pushing the schedule back would benefit people using local tailors and CMT MTM programs. That would be a nice plus.

I agree, the turnaround time for traveling tailors is less than ideal. Some tailors don't even visit cities four times a year, so depending on who you use, you could be waiting 1.5 years to get something back (that was my schedule with one of the tailors I used to use). It's crazy, but depending on where you live, sometimes a local option isn't available. I think that's the case for a lot of people outside of NYC.

Anyway, I'll certainly rethink this, so thanks for the feedback.

@Mr. Six, Kylnadrochit tweed is definitely on the list, although there wasn't that much support for it when I tested the waters. Still going to push for it cause it's a personal favorite.
post #18612 of 19909
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post
 
 
@Mr. Six, Kylnadrochit tweed is definitely on the list, although there wasn't that much support for it when I tested the waters. Still going to push for it cause it's a personal favorite.

 

People don't know what's good. This is good.

 

post #18613 of 19909

Probably because it needs a name that people can actually spell.

post #18614 of 19909
Funky Scottish windowpane tweed?
post #18615 of 19909
I do have the Mirage it's a nice open weave and we put the books over the top of each other and they were identical. Felt exactly the same in hand as well. The Drapers was double the price.

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