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***SW&D Photography Thread*** - Page 49

post #721 of 991
Quote:
Originally Posted by el Bert View Post

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Damn, where is that??
post #722 of 991

 

 

 

 

post #723 of 991
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post
 

~bumping this shit~

 

 

I agree - it'd be good to have somewhere I can drop an interview link, or ask a question, or show some work and have a varied, interesting somewhat responsive discussion.

 

~publishing thoughts~

 

So, I've been thinking about doing some self-publishing recently - I've got a huge backlog of work and think I can make a pretty compelling 25-30 page zine, so I'm hoping that I can learn InDesign and make something that prints well and sell it for not much. More for the satisfaction of having it done and showing people than any desire to make fat stacks, I'd be happy if I broke even and learned enough to do it again. I habour a dream of working with other amateur photographers to make something quarterly - there used to be a cool zine called 'Stay Young' that was like $10 an issue and was really cool, I'd cut dozens of photos out each time. It since stopped (dude who made it I guess has other things to do).

 

~inspiration/reflection~

 

I've also been getting more and more interested in Black and White photography - I've always liked some of it, but really embracing the variation and possibilities:

I mean take Eugene Smith's Country Doctor - it's so brooding and intense and it feels BnW is a real part of that tone:

https://www.google.com/search?biw=1366&bih=657&tbm=isch&q=w+eugene+smith+country+doctor&revid=2010664420&sa=X&ved=0CCUQ1QJqFQoTCJGqosmHvMgCFcMblAodySYOKA

 

It really couldn't be the same without it black and white - obviously - but there'd be something about the nature of it, less serious, more optimistic or happy. I know that sounds cliche, but those images of the Country Doctor walking to work with a blue sky and green grass and yellow flowers, I mean it would be completely different.

 

Michael Kenna (https://www.google.com/search?q=michael+kenna&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAWoVChMI_Y2dw4e8yAIVgbiUCh1QHQa9&biw=1366&bih=657) also said something really fascinating, I'll butcher it here, he said that Black and White is inherently unrealistic, it's so far from a representation that he finds it much more creative and personal. I think that argument cuts both ways, but it's certainly a position I hadn't heard before.

 

Trent Parke (https://www.google.com/search?biw=1366&bih=657&tbm=isch&q=trent+parke+minutes+to+midnight&revid=131314767&sa=X&ved=0CB8Q1QJqFQoTCMvKhMuJvMgCFYYVpgodtugPzQ) - a bit closer to home, but again the intensity of these photos, the harsh whites and impossibly dark blacks, it's just so involved.

 

On the other hand, colours are so rad.

 

~good information~

 

I have really been enjoying The Art of Photography's youtube - each video that is on a photographer is really well done, shows a variety of images and has some interesting commentary. Not every comment is brilliant, not every opinion is necessary or something I agree with, but the guy pours a lot of effort into the choices he makes, and it shows.

 

the LPV show is, I think, the best podcast going - I really, really, like each one - find the comments really cool and discover tonnes of great work through listening. It always makes me want to buy a photobook though.

 

~getting better~

 

Is hard. Trying every day. Know I'm moving in the right direction, never know exactly what to do next. Hard to know whether it's worth pursuing digital recognition, or just tinker away on my own stuff, I kinda crave the small attention and affirmation of showing work, but detest the inauthentic ways people grasp for followers, likes and promotion.


Great post. I've been feeling uninspired and a bit down on my work lately and this was great for inspiration and a good kick in the ass. 


Edited by ShakeEmUp - 10/17/15 at 10:25pm
post #724 of 991

So film is really interesting to shoot with, and I think I've worked out why.

 

When I shoot a digital camera, I see an image straight away - no anticipation, no surprise, no tension - it's right there. So that means that I'm always completely aware of what I've shot and what I haven't.

 

In some ways that sounds like a good thing, but for me shooting with film, and leaving it months before getting it developed, I find that suddenly there are all these shots I forgot about, ones that worked, ones that didn't, it's kind of like reliving an entire few months and seeing those memories again, fresh, bizarre. I find it a very invigorating experience and both really interesting and really helpful. I'm a bit less attached to pictures (I haven't been looking at the LCD thinking 'yeah this one will be good') and I'm more carefree, I actually enjoy shooting more because the results are necessarily delayed.

 

I think it's something worth trying if you haven't before, there are some romantic reasons people give (it's magic!), but honestly for me it's worth the extra cost and effort purely because there's a freedom while shooting, and then a joyful discovery when things do get developed.

post #725 of 991
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

~bumping this shit~


I agree - it'd be good to have somewhere I can drop an interview link, or ask a question, or show some work and have a varied, interesting somewhat responsive discussion.

~publishing thoughts~

So, I've been thinking about doing some self-publishing recently - I've got a huge backlog of work and think I can make a pretty compelling 25-30 page zine, so I'm hoping that I can learn InDesign and make something that prints well and sell it for not much. More for the satisfaction of having it done and showing people than any desire to make fat stacks, I'd be happy if I broke even and learned enough to do it again. I habour a dream of working with other amateur photographers to make something quarterly - there used to be a cool zine called 'Stay Young' that was like $10 an issue and was really cool, I'd cut dozens of photos out each time. It since stopped (dude who made it I guess has other things to do).

x

~getting better~

Is hard. Trying every day. Know I'm moving in the right direction, never know exactly what to do next. Hard to know whether it's worth pursuing digital recognition, or just tinker away on my own stuff, I kinda crave the small attention and affirmation of showing work, but detest the inauthentic ways people grasp for followers, likes and promotion.

Dope dude. I remember when you were first getting started a couple years ago, asking lots of questions, etc and it's great to see how confident you are now. I myself stopped photography for a while and am just recently picking it back up with my old X-E1. Checked out the stuff you've been posting and you've really come a long way.

I think if you wanna make a zine, do it. But just remember that zines were always a thing that anyone could do. It was like the posterchild of DIY way back when, especially for punk/metal stuff. These days people throw around "zines" with really nice design and photography and ask for payment, but I remember mostly getting those things for free or a few bucks. $10 is the upper eschelon of what I would pay for a zine, and only so if it had content really worth buying/I knew the creators.

Teach yourself InDesign. It's easy. It's an awesome tool, and you can start teaching yourself design elements too that go hand-in-hand with photography. Make your zine but don't expect to make money off of it, even if it's just to break even. Do it for the love of it, and give em to people who seem interested. Once you get better and more confident and more exposed, make something really nice and charge.

Photography is a tough business to get into if you are really passionate about it. And improving your photography isn't simply just about taking pictures that look nice-- it's all about storytelling. Do you have a story that you want to tell? Is that story unique and interesting? Of course, you're going to have to promote yourself a little, but if you have truly interesting stories to tell, people will come. Make a blog, practice writing, practice telling stories in only a couple of photos, practice enhancing your writing with only 1 or 2 photos, and do it a lot.

I'm working on a zine with a buddy of mine. It's gonna be a small biannual publication on invasive species, with each zine on a specific species. We're doing kudzu for the first one and snakehead for the second one. It's gonna be small, but it basically explores cultural differences between these creatures' countries of origin versus their presence in the US. We mostly destroy kudzu in the US, but the Japanese have been using it for desserts, honey, jams, teas, etc for centuries. Refugees from Africa have supplemented their income by harvesting vines and making baskets. There's a Japanese professor I'm interviewing for it who uses kudzu fibers to weave into a dope fabric from an old Japanese loom (she also leads a multi-day workshop on how to do it that I may be able to attend). It'll have lots of ecological science with a heavy dose of culture, too. Is it interesting? I don't know. I think so. I think it's amazing how photographs (and the act of photography) make you look at things in a different light and have the ability to change your perspective, so using it in a publication to try and challenge this ecological xenophobia a little bit can help control invasives in a much better fashion. That's the lofty goal, but it's gonna be mostly dope photos and dope recipes.

But I know that we'll probably be sinking our own money into it. If you do it for the love of the story, though, it's worth it to see something you created from scratch. Your own photos, your own design, your own involvement in the whole printing process. To me, when I think of getting better at photography, I think that learning how to take photos is a very small component. You've gotta have an immense love for people, places, their stories, and the ability to tell it well. This is why blogs are awesome. They're free, and you've got all the tools in 2015 to reach anyone you want with your photographs and stories, no matter how boring or niche they may seem.
post #726 of 991
Thread Starter 
Fuck, I will even throw in to do a SWD photography / arts publication if we really wanna talk about working with amateur artists on a global scale
post #727 of 991
really like that attitude, Matt. I don't have any functional film cameras now, but maybe it's a product of growing up with only film around that I really enjoyed shooting it for the years I did and it did help me learn a lot that I wouldn't have, otherwise. That said, I try hard as I can not to peak at the LCD, and I'm even thinking of just covering it with black tape forever.

Incidentally Leica had released a special-edition (read: $$$$$$) M something that came without an LCD which I thought was a great idea but it will not likely make it into regular issue production. I still really want to shoot a rangefinder, I had an old one a while ago and it's really something I enjoyed.
post #728 of 991
Just stumbled on this discussion but I could lend design/layout skills to a publication (as well as photos). Sounds fun.
post #729 of 991
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benesyed View Post

Damn, where is that??

Pomponion state beach, maybe 40 mins south of SF?
post #730 of 991
Quote:
Originally Posted by g transistor View Post


Dope dude. I remember when you were first getting started a couple years ago, asking lots of questions, etc and it's great to see how confident you are now. I myself stopped photography for a while and am just recently picking it back up with my old X-E1. Checked out the stuff you've been posting and you've really come a long way.

I think if you wanna make a zine, do it. But just remember that zines were always a thing that anyone could do. It was like the posterchild of DIY way back when, especially for punk/metal stuff. These days people throw around "zines" with really nice design and photography and ask for payment, but I remember mostly getting those things for free or a few bucks. $10 is the upper eschelon of what I would pay for a zine, and only so if it had content really worth buying/I knew the creators.

Teach yourself InDesign. It's easy. It's an awesome tool, and you can start teaching yourself design elements too that go hand-in-hand with photography. Make your zine but don't expect to make money off of it, even if it's just to break even. Do it for the love of it, and give em to people who seem interested. Once you get better and more confident and more exposed, make something really nice and charge.

Photography is a tough business to get into if you are really passionate about it. And improving your photography isn't simply just about taking pictures that look nice-- it's all about storytelling. Do you have a story that you want to tell? Is that story unique and interesting? Of course, you're going to have to promote yourself a little, but if you have truly interesting stories to tell, people will come. Make a blog, practice writing, practice telling stories in only a couple of photos, practice enhancing your writing with only 1 or 2 photos, and do it a lot.

I'm working on a zine with a buddy of mine. It's gonna be a small biannual publication on invasive species, with each zine on a specific species. We're doing kudzu for the first one and snakehead for the second one. It's gonna be small, but it basically explores cultural differences between these creatures' countries of origin versus their presence in the US. We mostly destroy kudzu in the US, but the Japanese have been using it for desserts, honey, jams, teas, etc for centuries. Refugees from Africa have supplemented their income by harvesting vines and making baskets. There's a Japanese professor I'm interviewing for it who uses kudzu fibers to weave into a dope fabric from an old Japanese loom (she also leads a multi-day workshop on how to do it that I may be able to attend). It'll have lots of ecological science with a heavy dose of culture, too. Is it interesting? I don't know. I think so. I think it's amazing how photographs (and the act of photography) make you look at things in a different light and have the ability to change your perspective, so using it in a publication to try and challenge this ecological xenophobia a little bit can help control invasives in a much better fashion. That's the lofty goal, but it's gonna be mostly dope photos and dope recipes.

But I know that we'll probably be sinking our own money into it. If you do it for the love of the story, though, it's worth it to see something you created from scratch. Your own photos, your own design, your own involvement in the whole printing process. To me, when I think of getting better at photography, I think that learning how to take photos is a very small component. You've gotta have an immense love for people, places, their stories, and the ability to tell it well. This is why blogs are awesome. They're free, and you've got all the tools in 2015 to reach anyone you want with your photographs and stories, no matter how boring or niche they may seem.

 

Awesome post!

 

To clarify a few things:

- I'd just want to make a zine for the experience more than anything - I like that zines are unprecious, tear out a photo and plaster it on the wall, tear one in half and make a greeting card out of it. I like that because they are more DIY and cheap they get interacted with more and revered a little less. I have a few photobook I love, but I'd never touch the pages, but photos from zines are actually up in my room and I look at every day.

 

- I'm speculating about pricing and stuff, I won't really know what things cost until it's done, but sinking $50-$100 into something for fun is a pretty cheap way to share and enjoy and participate, in my mind.

 

- The storytelling aspect is so challenging - and I agree completely with what you're saying.

 

- I like your idea, I'd buy a copy for sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by g transistor View Post

Fuck, I will even throw in to do a SWD photography / arts publication if we really wanna talk about working with amateur artists on a global scale

 

I'd be so into making this happen - it'd be a fucking blast! I'll shoot you a PM :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by the shah View Post

really like that attitude, Matt. I don't have any functional film cameras now, but maybe it's a product of growing up with only film around that I really enjoyed shooting it for the years I did and it did help me learn a lot that I wouldn't have, otherwise. That said, I try hard as I can not to peak at the LCD, and I'm even thinking of just covering it with black tape forever.

Incidentally Leica had released a special-edition (read: $$$$$$) M something that came without an LCD which I thought was a great idea but it will not likely make it into regular issue production. I still really want to shoot a rangefinder, I had an old one a while ago and it's really something I enjoyed.

 

I don't have anything to add, but I'm nodding along. Shot anything cool recently?

post #731 of 991

I want to get in a habit of going on frequent walks with my camera. Bought a Fuji XE-2 recently which has been great for this. Hopeing to keep this up and be constantly shooting, getting feedback, etc.

 

 

post #732 of 991

Last shot is great! Very voyeuristic and a bit of tension.

 

Like the drastic differences in the tones and light.

post #733 of 991
I like the first one for the same reasons Matt pointed out. Morning light is always so ominous
post #734 of 991

Thanks! I've always like both of your work (I lurk a lot) so I appreciate the feedback. Wish I could've shot the last one sharper but it was around 6 p.m. when I was shooting.

 

I've been taking photos for a quiet a while and still haven't reached a point where I feel like I'm above "good."  I started taking photography classes through my schools art department last semester though which has really helped me think more about my work and given me room to improve.  I get to shoot with a 4x5 camera this semester too which is super exciting. 

 

What have you guys been shooting, reading, looking at for inspiration? I enjoyed the discussions this page and the one before and like the idea of making this like the RHET thread but with photos.  I've been really interested in Tina Barney's work lately 

 

 

http://www.tinabarney.com/#/theaterofmanners/

post #735 of 991

Hey I made a new series - here it is: http://mwd.photography/It-s-Spring-and-I-m-Alone-1

 

Fun to make, like having it done. Here are some select images:

 

 

 

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