or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Moccasins, loafers, luxury driving, boat shoes
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Moccasins, loafers, luxury driving, boat shoes

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I am looking for a pair of good (ok, great) shoes that can either be Moccasins, Loafers, Boat Shoes or Luxury Driving Shoes. Rubber or leather soled is ok (I prefer rubber). I was looking at this: RLPL Link But they are too large, the smallest size they come in is a 7.5. I am a 6.5-7 (depending on the brand). I was also considering Tod's, but I am worried that the little leather knobs will not last long. Anyone know of a similar style of shoe, but with a solid sole? Any info you can enlighten me with would be greatly appreciated. Jon.
post #2 of 25
perhaps not in the same league of quality, but coach makes an exact same shoe as the rlpl shoe that you link to, solid soft rubber sole cole haan also makes something similar with nike shock in the sole (solid hard rubber sole though and not as elegant, just casual for cargo pants or shorts) you can also try car shoe but they'll mostly have rubber nubs and not a solid rubber sole
post #3 of 25
I have a pair of Bally driving shoes that look exactly like that shape except they have a molded sole that comes up the back. Pretty much any driving shoe even without the nubby sole will have a rounded heel that comes up the back a bit.
post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
perhaps not in the same league of quality, but coach makes an exact same shoe as the rlpl shoe that you link to, solid soft rubber sole cole haan also makes something similar with nike shock in the sole (solid hard rubber sole though and not as elegant, just casual for cargo pants or shorts) you can also try car shoe but they'll mostly have rubber nubs and not a solid rubber sole
Hmm, that might work; do you have a link to a picture? The coach website does not have men's shoes. Thanks. Jon.
post #5 of 25
I saw Coach shoes at the Bon Marché (Macy's now I guess). You might try their website.
post #6 of 25
I just purchased some driving shoes from Land's End.   I like the fact that they come in regular and wide widths, as I have wide feet, and most shoes don't fit me well as a result.   Great price, too.   http://www.landsend.com/cgi-bin....70&bc=1
post #7 of 25
Quote:
I just purchased some driving shoes from Land's End.   I like the fact that they come in regular and wide widths, as I have wide feet, and most shoes don't fit me well as a result.   Great price, too.   http://www.landsend.com/cgi-bin....70&bc=1
Is your car so difficult to drive?
post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Quote:
(Kai @ 08 June 2004, 5:41) I just purchased some driving shoes from Land's End. I like the fact that they come in regular and wide widths, as I have wide feet, and most shoes don't fit me well as a result. Great price, too. http://www.landsend.com/cgi-bin....70&bc=1
Is your car so difficult to drive?
Hey troll: do you have something positive to add? Jon.
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Quote:
(Kai @ 08 June 2004, 5:41) I just purchased some driving shoes from Land's End.   I like the fact that they come in regular and wide widths, as I have wide feet, and most shoes don't fit me well as a result.   Great price, too.   http://www.landsend.com/cgi-bin....70&bc=1
Is your car so difficult to drive?
Any moron can drive a car poorly. My car is difficult to drive well. Good shoes definitely make the process of performance driving easier.
post #10 of 25
The last pair of boat shoes I bought were by Rockport. (Don't hate on them). Very comfortable, great for weekends, and they are holding up great. Not a luxury type of shoe, to be sure, but good for running errands when I don't want to get all "dressed up". Please avoid the Sperry kind with white soles, unless you have a yacht to match. IMO, the driving-style shoes look a little more elegant, if the term can apply to a mocassin. They are like the poor man's venetian loafer--if poor men can afford Tod's.
post #11 of 25
I've got a pair of the Tod's loafers in black -- the ones with leather soles but with the little rubber nubs (which have lasted just fine over the last three years, being worn about once every 2 weeks or so). I used to like them more than I do now. The heel is sort of squared off, which I've come to find a little too trendy for my taste even though it's really not very noticeable. Kai, what do you drive? (fast/fun cars are one of my hobbies -- driving and reading about them, not working on them). A performance car that is difficult to drive well? I'm guessing a Porsche 911 (1995 or earlier likely, which had more of an oversteer issue I understand). These days there are lots of performance cars that are (relatively) easy to drive well.... my BMW fitting into that category.
post #12 of 25
Quote:
I've got a pair of the Tod's loafers in black -- the ones with leather soles but with the little rubber nubs (which have lasted just fine over the last three years, being worn about once every 2 weeks or so).  I used to like them more than I do now.  The heel is sort of squared off, which I've come to find a little too trendy for my taste even though it's really not very noticeable. Kai,  what do you drive?  (fast/fun cars are one of my hobbies -- driving and reading about them, not working on them).  A performance car that is difficult to drive well?  I'm guessing a Porsche 911 (1995 or earlier likely, which had more of an oversteer issue I understand).  These days there are lots of performance cars that are (relatively) easy to drive well.... my BMW fitting into that category.
I drive a 2004 Dodge Viper.  No traction control  and 570 foot-pounds of torque means that a half inch on the throttle can make the difference between bringing it strong out of the corner and throttle-induced oversteer/spin.  Good shoes help.   The Viper is one of the few pure driving cars left, without the safety nets of traction control, forgiving suspension, or designed-in understeer.  It's definitely a two hands on the wheel kind of car, with a long/steep learning curve.  Lots of fun learning, however.  
post #13 of 25
Some of the weirdest driving shoes I've seen are these: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=5301331942 Patent leather, and a big wrap-around silicone reinforcement. I actually tried a pair on at Neiman Marcus, and they are very comfortable, but they are just a bit too far-out there on the style spectrum for my taste.
post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Some of the weirdest driving shoes I've seen are these: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=5301331942 Patent leather, and a big wrap-around silicone reinforcement. I actually tried a pair on at Neiman Marcus, and they are very comfortable, but they are just a bit too far-out there on the style spectrum for my taste.
Puma makes some decent lace-up driving / racing shoes. But, they look quite outrageous and are not really the style I am looking for. Puma Jon.
post #15 of 25
imageWIS i unfortunately cannot find a pic of the coach shoes the model name, however, is called 'gerrard'
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Moccasins, loafers, luxury driving, boat shoes