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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 202

post #3016 of 5749
Is it possible to use reflective sheeths to reflect heat away from useless subfloor spaces?
Wood could be overdried by floor heating and will shrink- warp.
post #3017 of 5749
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I wouldn't rely on underfloor heating if you're sticking to wood. Like turk said, wood is awful for heat transfer.

Agreed. I mentioned that in the original post. There will be some areas of tile, I wonder if just doing those would help since they're tile.

The places I've seen with floor heating are usually polished concrete or tile. Wood is definitely not a good option for underfloor heating, double bad because there is no thermal mass below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

As for bumpouts, my house has them; and I'm sure they are not done to the standards your place will be, and we have no problems with hot or cold spots.

We're going to use the spray foam type insulation for this room. Hopefully that makes a difference. I want the bumpout because it improves the flow of the space, but I don't want to risk cold spots.
post #3018 of 5749
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

There are a lot of houses that heat the bathroom, and the whole house for that matter, strictly with underfloor hear [sic].

In the same way that a lot of people are albinos, yes that is true.






Anyway, additionally, I would never, ever consider underfloor heating under a wood floor. Expansion/contraction/warp risk is high enough without major heat gradients.
post #3019 of 5749
My entire home is heated with hydronic radiant heat but I live in San Francisco so we don't have "major heat gradients". I love not having HVAC vents so for us it's a big plus. If we lived somewhere that required AC, not sure it would make as much sense.
post #3020 of 5749
Quote:
Originally Posted by archetypal_yuppie View Post

In the same way that a lot of people are albinos, yes that is true.

Anyway, additionally, I would never, ever consider underfloor heating under a wood floor. Expansion/contraction/warp risk is high enough without major heat gradients.

Wood floor does introduce risk. Otherwise, radiant floor heating with a boiler is the same basic system as using radiators. It may not be common where you live, but it's widely used in many places that don't need AC.
post #3021 of 5749
I'm sure Virginia is littered with them.
post #3022 of 5749
These guys have no problem retrofitting under-floor radiators into a 100+ year old home with wood floors:
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/article/0,,20163505,00.html

They do spray insulation under the tubing and recommend hardwood with narrower planks to avoid expansion problems, but they don't seem to think it is a big deal.
post #3023 of 5749
Quote:
Originally Posted by archetypal_yuppie View Post

I'm sure Virginia is littered with them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

widely used in many places that don't need AC.

You're struggling with reading comprehension.
post #3024 of 5749
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post


You're struggling with reading comprehension.

Your location label is "VA," dumbass. As in, pointing out how that does not apply to you. Unless you're not really there, then change dumbass to liar.
post #3025 of 5749
Quote:
Originally Posted by archetypal_yuppie View Post

Your location label is "VA," dumbass. As in, pointing out how that does not apply to you. Unless you're not really there, then change dumbass to liar.

Nobody's comments on the topic were location specific, including mine:
Quote:
Otherwise, radiant floor heating with a boiler is the same basic system as using radiators. It may not be common where you live, but it's widely used in many places that don't need AC.

Stop derailing the thread with illiteracy.
post #3026 of 5749
We have hydronic in concrete at our place on the coast. It kind of sucks as a main heating source in my opinion.
post #3027 of 5749
I don't think anyone uses that as a main heat source up here where it actually gets cold.
post #3028 of 5749

The company came to start work on our full house repipe today.  At lunch time I get a call about some minor tile I knew they would have to remove and the words "we are still tracking all the pipes before cutting anything."  Around 3pm I get a call from the company's office stating the person is on their way for a house visit.  I thought it was odd and ask what for.  Turns out the plumber had to call an HVAC tech to come.  Got a word late today that a 2-3 day job will take 6.

 

I am not mad, I am paying 1 price and am pushing for a cash payment discount.  

 

The old man who built my house in 1959 was a damn good engineer which usually causes issues for repairs....

post #3029 of 5749

That's really not bad.  My 6 month remodel is 98% done now (not including furniture) and I'm past the 2 year mark now....though I did expand the scope a bit more than I originally planned. 

post #3030 of 5749
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas_jack View Post

I don't think anyone uses that as a main heat source up here where it actually gets cold.

It's meant for slightly more temperate climates.
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