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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 537

post #8041 of 11261
Quote:
Originally Posted by anrobit View Post

Why must the shoe be conditioned while still wet?

Conditioner doesn't have to be applied to wet leather. The advice was only in the context of washing (and rinsing) shoes.

The conditioner will slow the evaporation rate and allow the water to spread out through the fibers of the leather more evenly. It helps to prevent water stains.

Water stains are the result of salts and other chemicals dissolving in the water and being transported to the interface between wet and dry. One such interface is the grain surface of the leather. Another is the edge of the wet area. If water evaporates too quickly, the stain occurs just at that interface. Such stains can be difficult, sometimes impossible, to remove.

Casual washing and rinsing may not create water stains but it is always better to be safe rather than sorry. Hence the conditioner.

In any case, applying the conditioner while the leather is wet won't hurt anything. In fact, when the pores are open and cleansed of residual oils and waxes the conditioner will enter the leather more easily.
post #8042 of 11261
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


IIRC, regular old fashioned soap is made from fats mixed with lye. Saddlesoap like Properts is compounded much like regular soap--it's supposed to be used with water...at least enough to work up a lather. And that means a very wet sponge or running water. The glycerin bars are intended to work up a lather as well. Lexol-ph is formulated very much like ph-balanced baby shampoo (which makes a fine leather cleaner, BTW). Again lathering and rinsing is indicated.

It is not automatically harmful to rinse leather with running water...lots of processes in making shoes or working leather are entirely dependent on getting the leather wet. Shoes, however, tend to have inconsistent areas of absorption after they have been worn awhile simply because of all the polish (wax) build-up. The water will not by itself have any deleterious effects esp. if the shoes are conditioned immediately after washing/rinsing--while the leather is still wet. The real problem is water stains that may result from heavy absorption in one area and less in another...again conditioning can go a long way towards preventing that.

If you're concerned, again using a very wet sponge is a good solution.

But the bottom line is that leaving the tallow or glycerin residues on shoes is not good. If nothing else, it will collect dust and grit and accelerate cracking.

And you can't get either a high or a long lasting shine over grease.

When you get right down to it, it's worth remembering that saddlesoap was formulated for saddles.

 

Thanks for the response, as always!

 

I use Fiebing's Saddle Soap Paste: http://www.fiebing.com/catalogue/soaps-oils/?product=97  Not because I'm loyal to it, but simply because it's what my nearest cobbler carried way back when  I bought it.  I use a wet natural sea sponge to work up a lather and apply it.  Once it's dry, I wipe with a cloth and then buff with a brush.  Like I said, it's really just one particular belt that I regularly use it on (a thick, heavy, casual leather belt that is usually worn with jeans).  I have a pair of saddle shoes that I used it on for a while, made from Horween's Dublin leather, but I quit because I didn't like the build-up that started developing around the stitches.  However, that was happening by following the instructions on the back of the tin, which doesn't say to rinse off the leather.

 

If I ever have cause to use it on them again, I'll certainly make sure I rinse it better, and I'll do the same with my belt.

 

One follow up question to your response above.  Do you always recommend conditioning while the leather is still wet?  How about in the case of shoes that get saturated in a downpour?  Most of the information you find out there recommends letting them dry in the standard method (on their sides, away from heat, stuffed with newspaper, etc.) and then conditioning/polishing after they have thoroughly dried.  It actually makes perfect sense to me that conditioning them while wet would keep the fibers properly lubricated while the water evaporates.  But again, that's not what you generally find recommended "out there."  Not saying I believe everything I read, of course.

post #8043 of 11261
Quote:
Originally Posted by anrobit View Post
 

Why must the shoe be conditioned while still wet?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Conditioner doesn't have to be applied to wet leather. The advice was only in the context of washing (and rinsing) shoes.

The conditioner will slow the evaporation rate and allow the water to spread out through the fibers of the leather more evenly. It helps to prevent water stains.

In any case, applying the conditioner while the leather is wet won't hurt anything. In fact, when the pores are open and cleansed of residual oils and waxes the conditioner will enter the leather more easily.

 

Ah, it seems my question was answered while I was typing.

post #8044 of 11261
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post
 

I'd just leave them as they are.

 

Shell is beautiful because its shell. Just roll with it and learn to love them.

 

I've decided to go with this approach on the shell Daltons, maybe trying to darken the light one up a bit at some point.

 

In the meantime, given that I live in snowy NJ and work in NYC, I'd like to apply a sole protector of some sort. Wouldn't be adverse to dressing them down a little with a minilug.

 

Any recommendations?

post #8045 of 11261





Just picked up a deep gouge on the toe during their maiden voyage, heartbreaking but I guess it's nothing that can't be waxed to high polish and chalked up as character:brick:

Luckily they're fairly dark so I'm likely to be the only one that ever notices.

Any other recommendations?
post #8046 of 11261

I'm pretty sure some good quality cream/wax to match that color (rioja it looks like?) will cover that up and will hardly be noticeable.

post #8047 of 11261

hey gang, I'm a total noob sorry to bother you all.

I got a pair of m.a+ staple boots in camel leather ( I don't think it's reverse ) about 5 months ago and I love them and want them to age nicely with a patina, etc. not looking for a mirror shine or anything (they're actually already fairly rough and super badass looking) but I do wonder if there are any steps I can take or products I can use to ensure they last as long as possible. I live in Toronto, Canada and of course I try to keep them out of the salt and slush. Any storage tips or products you can recommend would be greatly appreciated. I just don't want them to crack or warp or anything. 
I'm also aware the best thing for them might be to do nothing at all ( lots of people have told me this already ) but I'm finding it hard to resist baby-ing them hah. 

Thanks! 

G

post #8048 of 11261

these are the m.a+ boots I was talking about. Cheers.

post #8049 of 11261
Itsuo, it will be pretty easy to cover up, I reckon 2 layers of cream and 2 layers of polish would do it.
post #8050 of 11261

Carmina Austerity Brogues

 

I understand burnishing finishes and antiquing but I think these got left on the wheel for a little too long.  They look gorgeous despite this side and I may try some cleaner and coats of polish to work it out vs sending them back.  Any suggestions or is this look normal?

 

post #8051 of 11261
Quote:
Originally Posted by goosedog View Post



these are the m.a+ boots I was talking about. Cheers.

Whole cut ankle boots! Nice.
post #8052 of 11261

Not shoe care per se, but can anyone tell me what is causing these creases in my AE Strands?  These pictures are of the interior edges of the shoes right at the balls of the feet:

 

Right shoe:

 

 

Left shoe:

 

post #8053 of 11261

Sorry for this obvious question - are you using shoe trees?

post #8054 of 11261
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillP View Post
 

Sorry for this obvious question - are you using shoe trees?

 

Yes.  The Woodlore ones from Nordstrom Rack, in the appropriate size.

post #8055 of 11261
Question guys: A week or so ago, I took a pretty good stumble coming up the outdoor stairs to the plaza of our building. In the process, I scuffed the pristine toe of my AE Bayfields. Brushed it good, rubbed with some lotion to get moisture back in and have now put some brown polish on. Abrasion seems gone, but I have a dark halo sort of ring on the toe. Any ideas? I'm debating rubbing the whole toecap with black paste wax to darken the whole area on both toes. Ideas?

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