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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 901

post #13501 of 19047

The key is not too add more, but to rather remove some of it. Wipe it down several times with a dampened cloth to see if it goes away.

post #13502 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

The key is not too add more, but to rather remove some of it. Wipe it down several times with a dampened cloth to see if it goes away.

awesome, thank you!

post #13503 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

The key is not too add more, but to rather remove some of it. Wipe it down several times with a dampened cloth to see if it goes away.

 

+1. Maybe some spot-application of Saphir Reno'Mat if it is needed....not that I've ever tried reno on only a spot but I'd think it'd work...in theory. 

post #13504 of 19047

Renomat can be too heavy, FWIW. It's more like a stripper. I wouldn't recommend it.

post #13505 of 19047
If it were my Clagg bag in that condition, I'd make sure it was clean and conditioned as necessary, then do a whole lot of nothing. My grandmother would say, "this needs a good lea vin' alone." Keep it clean and conditioned and see what it looks like a year from now.

Good bags, like shoes, that are actually used for their intended purpose, but properly maintained, develop a look that makes them endearing.

The spots may even out over time. Or they won't. But I suspect the bag will look better and better with time with only an occasional wipe down and an even more rare application of a little Bick 4
post #13506 of 19047

Don't forget to brush would be another one.

post #13507 of 19047

I'm thinking I'll try a little white vinegar/water solution and brush it out a few days and then take it from there. I would imagine that it will even out some over the course of time and use.

post #13508 of 19047
Quick nonshoe leather related question. My wife tossed a pair of jeans with a belt in the wash. Not dryer though.

The belt is an AE good quality brown belt. It's basically soaked but hard to tell if it's ruined. I'm just going to hang it to dry but worried it'll be ruined or wrinkled.

What do you guys think? Can leather take a saoking and revert back to its original look?
post #13509 of 19047
Hi

Got my first leather boots, Blundstone 550 "walnut brown"
wore it for 3 days and there is stretch mark on top of right boot:



















on the top of the right boot the shape looks stretched and triangular compared to the left boot which is all smooth and round on top of it,

wanted to ask if this can be fixed and what the reason it became this way,

maybe I pulled the front tab too hard? although Blundstone say the tab "meant to be pulled"
post #13510 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post

Quick nonshoe leather related question. My wife tossed a pair of jeans with a belt in the wash. Not dryer though.

The belt is an AE good quality brown belt. It's basically soaked but hard to tell if it's ruined. I'm just going to hang it to dry but worried it'll be ruined or wrinkled.

What do you guys think? Can leather take a saoking and revert back to its original look?

Being that it was exposed to high alkaline soap most likely it will take a lot of effort. Soak it in a white vinegar and distilled water solution for a bit and let it dry out, then condition with Lexol and let dry again and see what you have.
Quote:
Originally Posted by l4hh View Post

Hi

Got my first leather boots, Blundstone 550 "walnut brown"
wore it for 3 days and there is stretch mark on top of right boot:



















on the top of the right boot the shape looks stretched and triangular compared to the left boot which is all smooth and round on top of it,

wanted to ask if this can be fixed and what the reason it became this way,

maybe I pulled the front tab too hard? although Blundstone say the tab "meant to be pulled"
for the life of me I can't figure out what you're referring to.
post #13511 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

for the life of me I can't figure out what you're referring to.

I'm in with you, Pat. :nodding:

post #13512 of 19047
I see it. further up by where your middle of foot starts going up to the ankle.

That's a bad shape, have you used shoe trees all along?

And PB thanks for the advice I will give it a try assuming they are in bad shape after they dry. In a crowded wash maybe it was mostly water!
post #13513 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

for the life of me I can't figure out what you're referring to.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

I'm in with you, Pat. :nodding:

 

here explanation picture, I'm sure I see it it is real:)

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post

I see it. further up by where your middle of foot starts going up to the ankle.

That's a bad shape, have you used shoe trees all along?
 

No I did not use shoe trees, just wore them three times and noticed it.

post #13514 of 19047

Do you kneel on your boot vamps a lot? If you do, which side?

post #13515 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Do you kneel on your boot vamps a lot? If you do, which side?

I did not kneel, usually I'm sitting in this position:

 

Could this be the reason? hard to beleive new Blundstones will deform just by sitting like that for three days.

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