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Modern Tailor.com review - my experience - Page 8

post #106 of 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by unjung View Post
I'm not going to pay $200 for a shirt made in China.

I just went to moderntailor.com website and it looks like they added more of those $200 fabric this week...
post #107 of 688
I'm glad I stumbled on this! I'm looking to get my first MTM shirt (the orange gingham check like the one posted earlier, only w/ a BD collar) and was looking for reviews of ModernTailor and found this thread. There's some great info in here. I'll definitely be sending in measurements from one of my best fitting off-the-peg shirts.

And, to be a beggar, anyone have one of those $20 vouchers they could shoot my way?
post #108 of 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.K View Post
I have e-mailed a few times with modern tailor and they said that as long as notes are put on the order they wil adjust colars and points. They wil also add extra to the sleeve opening for watches also.

Good to know.
Thanks
post #109 of 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by stilts121 View Post
I'm glad I stumbled on this! I'm looking to get my first MTM shirt (the orange gingham check like the one posted earlier, only w/ a BD collar) and was looking for reviews of ModernTailor and found this thread. There's some great info in here. I'll definitely be sending in measurements from one of my best fitting off-the-peg shirts.

And, to be a beggar, anyone have one of those $20 vouchers they could shoot my way?

Hello Please try voucher styleforum20
expires in 30 days.

Emma
post #110 of 688
Hi Emma.
Could you tell us more about new $199 fabrics ?
post #111 of 688
^Hi Emma,

Pl0x don't.

By the way that code also works for repeat customers, I just found out.
post #112 of 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Syb View Post
Hi Emma.
Could you tell us more about new $199 fabrics ?

I've been trying to figure that out myself too.... The $199 fabrics are alumo and testa which apparently are some of the best fabric out there.... I have never had one of those fabric in front of me so I can't really tell why it's so much better than everything else....

This is the info I found about Alumo fabric:

About our fabrics - Alumo
By englishshirts

As you probably are aware our premier bespoke shirt fabrics come from the Swiss mill of Alumo.

Alumo truly are one of the best shirt fabric producers anywhere. For staple shirt fabric then you cannot go wrong with their 120s 2 ply Supraluxe range, a fine quality cloth well woven and sensibly finished leaving a good feel to the cotton when worn.

However, it is for the higher yarn count fabrics that Alumo are justifiably famous. Their 170s and 3 ply ranges are to die for; and the Duecento 200s fabric make probably the best cotton shirt you can buy.
post #113 of 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbia92 View Post
I've been trying to figure that out myself too.... The $199 fabrics are alumo and testa which apparently are some of the best fabric out there.... I have never had one of those fabric in front of me so I can't really tell why it's so much better than everything else....

Are you sure of that ?
If MT offers Alumo, Testa (Mason, Monti...) why don't they give this information in fabric description ?
post #114 of 688
Another voucher code, that I think works is : JEREMY20. Can't use two vouchers consecutively, though. It's almost as if they don't want me to have a free shirt

Will try again tomorrow.




*Operation failed, you has used one of free gift, can't use any more.*
post #115 of 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by moderntailoremma View Post
Hello Please try voucher styleforum20
expires in 30 days.

Emma

Thanks for the voucher! I just bought my second shirt. I measured correctly this time.

This time I'm using fabric X200 which is 200 thread count. oooo
post #116 of 688
Hello, everyone! I'm a new forum member and thought that this, probably, might be a good way to "introduce" myself (mostly my addiction to perfect fit) and to share something I've pondered a bit about. Some of you have wondered about sizing. I've done a bit of tailoring (a hobby, rather serious one in times - I used to study it for a longer while) and adjust rather much everything except suits and odd jackets, if they need a little bit of touchup. When it comes to creating a slim fit shirt measure set, an easy thing to do is first to put your best fitting (but old) shirt on and then to make some adjustments with different coloured thread outside it - just to try on the fit. It's not that hard to sew, especially when everything you need is a quick view to your desired measures. Of course, you can use even bobbypins (or basic pins, if you're careful). After finding a perfect fit for you, just write down the measures. Something to remember, though: A shirt is a vest with two tubes attached to it as sleeves. Although this is self evident, it's a good thing to remember. It's also made of non-elastic material, so just measuring your favourite cashmere doesn't do when you need some play. You also need to consider about your sleeves a bit when thinking about the "vest": Shoulder seams are a bit like joints, around which the sleeve "rotates" as you rise the hands. Adding some armpit-to-armpit -width gives you some room to play here (as do back pleats), but adding shoulder width doesn't really give anything - so keep them on the ends of your shoulders (where the collarbone ends (I use this width for jackets, as well, maybe adding one centimeter. There's nothing I hate more in clothes than overhanging shoulders. I don't like any extra on that area). To keep the room for movement, you need to keep the armholes as small as comfortably possible. Too large armholes simply drag the shirt up as you rise your arms - it's the same thing as with jackets. Think the underside of sleeves as "wires" attached to the sides of your shirt. If they're attached too low, they shall drag your shirt from your pants. Keep them as close to armpit as possible to get the desired size. Measure, with a tape, around your armpit and collarbone end with your hand hanging freely. Divide by two. This gives you usually a fit that has enough extra room (i.e. your measurement divided by two + ~1cm, which comes naturally). Waist is all about your tastes. You need some extra room to breath and sit, but, unless you're a real fan of lunch hours, this shouldn't be excessive. Sit and measure yourself, take a snug (but not too snug) fit, take a same measurement when standing up. Think about these. I generally go by first fit. Hips do need some room, although not excessively. Use a well fitting shirt as a guide. Sleeves depend a bit from shoulder fit (I still maintain that it should be exact, as it doesn't really add any comfort and hinders movement if it is too big) and armpit-to-armpit -width (as this dictates the sideways "give" of the sleeve, it affects to sleeves, naturally).
My own preferred (slim) fit (I give these straight to "measure your shirt" -fields to be copied as well as ever possible): Collar: As it is, no adjustments here. Take the measurement of your best fitting shirt (or pack your measurement tape and go to shop, finding the best fitting shirt and measuring it). Chest: Measured circumference +7-8cm. This gives you some room to move, still avoiding bagginess. Divide this by two (to get the half-measure for websites). Waist: Measured standing circumference +4cm (the exact sitting measurement - check yours). Divide this by two. Hips: Measured standing circumference +7cm. Divide by two. Shoulders (yoke): The exact measure between the ends of the tips of your collarbones. Armhole: The exact measure taken around your armpit and the tip of your collarbone. If your measuring tape is narrow (or you use cord or something to measure the exact circumference), add 1-1,5cm to measurement. Keep this measure snug to get the best arm movement and least shirt lifting. Divide, again, by two for half measure for websites. Sleeve length: Measure from the tip of your collarbone, go with your preference. I measure mine to the base of my wrist (just under the wristbone) and allow the sleeve to ride up a bit when moving. This is just a preference - it gives me some "extra height" (I'm 6' 2", thin, so the effect is quite dashing). Some may prefer to take the measurement having their arm bent to 90° angle. This is fine - it's your preference. Cuffs: Your tight measurement around the widest point of the wrist + 2-3cm. Go snug (i.e. +2) with french cuffs. If you use a watch, measure around it (when worn) and add 0,5 - 1cm (and note the maker about this & to which side to add it). Bicep: Flex your bicep to the max, measure around it, add 3-4cm to it, divide by two for websites. Shirt length: Go by your tastes. I like longer fit when worn tucked in, a tad shorter when worn outside my pants. The difference here is about 5-10cm. Extra thing: Pleats when jacket will be used all the time. Darts if you wear your shirt without a jacket a lot (or under knits etc.). Pleats will give you some extra room for movement, while making the back look uglier. You may be able to reduce ~1cm from armpit-to-armpit circumference when using pleats. I also specify that I want a horizontal lowest buttonhole on the front pleat. This has nothing to do with movement (as I've seen widely speculated), but it just stays shut more securely. Vertical buttonholes give some room and flex (sideways), while horizontal doesn't. So, that's my "formula". It's tuned to my tastes and some may feel that it's not for them. However, if you're ordering your first MTM that requires you to give your measurements, you may use it as a loose guide. I'm adamant about the collar, shoulder and armhole measurements - these make or break the feel and fit of the shirt. Rest is up to own tastes - I would warn about making the armpit to armpit width with less than 6cm of extra to chest circumference, but if the very snug fit is your thing, well, who am I to judge you. I actually use - due to construction - less extra with my jackets than with my shirts here. Only thing I don't like about Modern Tailor is the lack of thick, nice tattersall fabrics (cotton and cotton/wool). It's pretty much impossible to find slim fit tattersall shirts. With -20°C (around -4°F) being common during winter months here, it would be nice to get some extra warmth and softness. I hope this helps someone.
post #117 of 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Syb View Post
Are you sure of that ?
If MT offers Alumo, Testa (Mason, Monti...) why don't they give this information in fabric description ?

I'm sure it's alumo and testa fabric. If you click on the category on the top of fabric page on moderntailor.com, you will see alumo and testa fabrics listed and those are the fabric that's listed $199... Anybody care to share what makes those fabric so special?
post #118 of 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbia92 View Post
I'm sure it's alumo and testa fabric. If you click on the category on the top of fabric page on moderntailor.com, you will see alumo and testa fabrics listed and those are the fabric that's listed $199... Anybody care to share what makes those fabric so special?

They're made by very, very high quality firms, last longer and have beautiful qualities (drape, look, pattern definition etc...). Alumo fabric is pretty much the very best you can ever wish to have your shirt made from - and Testa doesn't fall far from that (I'd say it is in a same level).

Go around the shops and feel the fabrics. You really can tell the difference by your hand and by your eye. My friend just got an odd jacket for an incredibly low price (drift market) which I just feeled. Then I opened the jacket and reason was certain - it was very, very high end Loro Piana wool.

Same applies to shirts. You can go by lower price fabrics, but occasionally...try the high end. After you've dialed your fit, that is.
post #119 of 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jussi View Post

Only thing I don't like about Modern Tailor is the lack of thick, nice tattersall fabrics (cotton and cotton/wool). It's pretty much impossible to find slim fit tattersall shirts. With -20°C (around -4°F) being common during winter months here, it would be nice to get some extra warmth and softness.


I think we tend to forget that moderntailor.com don't really make any fabrics. They are just a company that does tailoring. As such, I think we rely on them to pick good quality fabrics but have as wide range of selections of pattern and price point as possible to satisfy the need of all customers. I think we can suggest to them what fabrics we're looking for to help to guide them to stock more of the fabrics we want.
post #120 of 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbia92 View Post
I'm sure it's alumo and testa fabric. If you click on the category on the top of fabric page on moderntailor.com, you will see alumo and testa fabrics listed and those are the fabric that's listed $199... Anybody care to share what makes those fabric so special?

You're right! They should communicate better on this point cause it can explain the high price. I'm OK with Jussi. I've never worn Testa, but Alumo are very high quality, very beautiful and resistant fabrics. When you wear this kind of shirt you really feel it (light, soft).
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