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Dressing to your income level - Page 2

post #16 of 41
I understand this is a discussion forum, but this needs not the long drawn out responses. A suit is inappropriate if you look at it and you can see it is inappropriate because of the cut, material, etc. Otherwise, who the hell cares what brand it is. NORMAL PEOPLE DON'T THINK LIKE US HERE. A navy suit is a navy suit and no one will even notice anything other than a suit that fit well. And no one at work will ever fault you for an appropriately fitting suit (so long as it is not fashion forward). The only way anyone would know is if you pretentiously flaunt the label. In that case, YOU ARE THE PROBLEM, NOT THE SUIT. Even with this being style forum, I swear people over think the shit out of clothes here. /thread
post #17 of 41
Did someone say pretentiously flaunt the label? Am I doing this right?
post #18 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post
Its only politicians who buy cheaper garments to fool people into thinking that they are 'ordinary'.

+1.
post #19 of 41
Definitely I would hold back overall. You can dress up a level or two in this case but don't make your bosses feel weird around you. That said being the wealthy guy isn't a bad thing. Say you've made money off of stocks which you probably have.
post #20 of 41
Having worked in luxury retail for 5+ years, I have amassed a large wardrobe purchased at 75% off of retail or so. I have chosen to skip some lavish vacations, eating out 3 meals a day, and drive an 8 year old car. The fact that I drive an older car might lead some to think that although my clothes are nice, they are not as expensive as they may seem. Plus, how many people in a work environment where people are paid 50k-100k a year are really going to recognize a Kiton suit or pair of John Lobbs?
post #21 of 41
Your average working guy in a corporate environment will be wearing khakis and button up shirt from Macys.

Even some of the bigger jobs wear this stuff 90% of the time.
post #22 of 41
nobody is going to know the difference between your brioni and a run of the mill ralph lauren. wear them.
post #23 of 41
A well-fitting suit in a conservative pattern is always appropriate. People will notice that it fits well, but I don't think that will be a problem. If your Brioni/Kiton/Attolini is in a more adventurous fabric that is obviously "luxury," then there may be a problem. But it's not like people will see the label on a suit...
post #24 of 41
Even if you remove the Kiton or Brioni tag and sew it on you coat sleeve, no one will know. They'll just assume you couldn't afford Joseph Banks.
post #25 of 41
The point of this thread approaches something I've been thinking about as I'm about to spend some dough: do you want to dress a lot 'better' than your prospective clients if the purpose in wearing a business suit is to go out and rustle up some business?

I've got two distinct groups of 'prospects': Interior Designers and Leasing/Property Managers. The former are no problem as they are largely female. The latter is trickier as they are largely middle management males and tend to wear less than lovely stuff, while some of them are salemen and tend to be flashier dressers. Can you dress too well, or too conservatively, in these situations?
post #26 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by PTWilliams View Post
Even if you remove the Kiton or Brioni tag and sew it on you coat sleeve, no one will know. They'll just assume you couldn't afford Joseph Banks.

I work with good, salt of the Earth people who would never EVER spend $1,200.00 on a pair of shoes let alone $2,000.00 on a suit. I have one or more of both. They could care less. I don't brag about it nor do I EVER bring up the subject. Be you. Adhere to the Golden Rule. It's gonna be O.K.
post #27 of 41
I suppose you may want to get a feel for the office politics, general level of dress and the personality of your immediate managers if you were going to play it safe, above all focus on the position and doing well in it. I do think it's the rare person who'd recognize a Brioni vs anything else without seeing the tags, and those who can recognize it I'd suspect would have more appreciation than the type of envy that would be harmful. Just remember the reason that you are there and allow your dress to accent/compliment your professionalism rather than being the loudest voice for it. Good luck in the new gig!
post #28 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Costanza View Post
The point of this thread approaches something I've been thinking about as I'm about to spend some dough: do you want to dress a lot 'better' than your prospective clients if the purpose in wearing a business suit is to go out and rustle up some business? I've got two distinct groups of 'prospects': Interior Designers and Leasing/Property Managers. The former are no problem as they are largely female. The latter is trickier as they are largely middle management males and tend to wear less than lovely stuff, while some of them are salemen and tend to be flashier dressers. Can you dress too well, or too conservatively, in these situations?
I was recently in Singapore where I ws hoping to be introduced to an important Japanese businessman who could help me with a specific commercial problem. Anyway, my friend, Tiro, who is a bank manager with UOB Bank in Singapore knows the guy and offers to set up a meeting. So-o-o-o-o, on the second day of my trip Tiro meets me at my Hotel for breakfast and says "sorry mate, tough titty, your Japanese contact does not want to meet with you because you are from Australia (and I am not actually from Australia!!!)" So I asked Tiro - "but why?" - and the reason was that the person is a prominent Japanese businessman in Singapore who has had a lot of experience with Australians and New Zealanders - all of whom think it is really great to dress as shitty as possible" for fear of becoming what they call "tall poppies" - which is actually just an weak excuse to behave like a mob of cheapskates really. So there I was, in Singapore, missing out on a great opportunity because of a bunch of cheapskates living in Oceania - I was not going to take that crap lying down just because a big bag of bums from Oceania don't know how to dress properly. Anyway, long story short, I finally convinced Tiro to talk the Japanese guy into having a coffee with us just for a brief meeting to find out what his issue was - so at the meeting my first angry question to the guy was to ask what the guy's problem was with "westerners" whom he felt he was too good to meet for business - Guess what his reply was, he said that as an Asian he brings to the task that measure of self respect and dignity to make certain that he is always spotlessly clean and impeccably well dressed, not as a token of his own arrogance, which is what Australians and New Zealanders seem so afraid of projecting, but he cleans himself up and dresses properly as a token of his respect and humility for OTHER people who have to put up with having to meet him!!!! He dresses up as a token of gratitude, a token of his respect for others! How weird is that??? He said that if certain European cultures (eg New Zealanders) can't bring to the task that same measure of self respect to clean and dress themselves properly, well then how the bloody hell did we expect him to expect people like us who show no self respect for ourselves to then show any respect for anybody else - including HIMSELF? Ipso facto, if we were going to show no respect for him, well then he was going to extend F-all respect for us either, which was why he refused to meet with me when he found out I was living in Australia. I dress properly in Singapore now, and anywhere in Asia where my business takes me. So the hell with what other people think, if you know how to dress properly, and you have the right gear, chrissakes, dress yourself properly then, and fuck everyone else!!!!!
post #29 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by RockJaw View Post
So the hell with what other people think, if you know how to dress properly, and you have the right gear, chrissakes, dress yourself properly then, and fuck everyone else!!!!!
I actually enjoy the challenge of looking as expensively dressed as I can for the minimum possible outlay. The better I dress, the more confident I feel. If dressing well and feeling confident puts people off side, that's their problem. And, as a rule, Aussies can't dress for shit. I couldn't dress for shit until I discovered SF. TBH, I still have a long way to go until I can honestly refer to myself as a consistently snappy dresser. I still have some pre-SF throwbacks in my wardrobe that are about due for a date with Vinnies or the bin.
post #30 of 41
That story adds the 'lost in translation' dimension to the run-of-the-mill human misunderstanding. If you wear a nice grey two-button suit with brown brogues to Hogrock you are going to get beat up, whether you respect others or not.
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