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History of Fusing in jackets?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Can anyone enlighten me to the history of fusing in jackets? When was the technique developed? When did it become so widespread? I think it would be fascinating to know more about it. Thank you in advance.
post #2 of 14
Thread Starter 
No one? I know it's a slightly esoteric question, but I figured someone here would have know at least part of the story.
post #3 of 14
Doesn't exactly address your question about history, but is interesting... http://www.wendelltextiles.com/page5.htm
post #4 of 14
I too can only give a fraction of an answer. In my time, I've acquired many scores of vintage suits (most from the 1960s and before). Not a one is fused, even those that would have been considered mid- or even lower-end RTW. My guess is that sometime in the 1970s (an age when many sartorial plagues were visited upon the world) fusing became part of the suit-making arsenal.
post #5 of 14
Joseph Abboud in his recent autobiography Threads states that the technology was pioneered in Germany after World War II for the sinister reason that most of the good tailors had been Jewish and hence murdered by the cruel Nazis--a grisly case of necessity being the mother of invention.
post #6 of 14
What is the difference between a fusible and a non-fusible interfacing? A fusible interfacing/interlining is applied using heat. A interfacing/interlining without the special heat fusing adhesive is referred to as "sew-in" or non-fusible interfacing. Sew-in interfacing is not as popular as fusible interfacing because it requires more time to apply to the garment. It does not provide the same quality level as a fusible product. Funny.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Joseph Abboud in his recent autobiography Threads states that the technology was pioneered in Germany after World War II for the sinister reason that most of the good tailors had been Jewish and hence murdered by the cruel Nazis--a grisly case of necessity being the mother of invention.
Wow. That's awful. Thanks for the interesting information, guys. I knew someone would come through.
post #8 of 14
Right around the same time that selvage got taken out of jeans. So sad..
post #9 of 14
Reminds me of the line in Schindler's List where Goeth the Nazi camp commandant is admiring Schindler's silk suit.  Schindler glibly says, "I'd say I'd get you one, but the man who made it is probably dead, I don't know." Witty, cutting, sick and sad all at the same time.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Reminds me of the line in Schindler's List where Goeth the Nazi camp commandant is admiring Schindler's silk suit. Schindler glibly says, "I'd say I'd get you one, but the man who made it is probably dead, I don't know." Witty, cutting, sick and sad all at the same time.
Finally. Some one quoted from SL. (As can be read in my trials and tribulations regarding quotes from SL: http://66.170.193.77/cgi-bin....t=10382 ) Jon.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
What is the difference between a fusible and a non-fusible interfacing? A fusible interfacing/interlining is applied using heat. A interfacing/interlining without the special heat fusing adhesive is referred to as "sew-in" or non-fusible interfacing. Sew-in interfacing is not as popular as fusible interfacing because it requires more time to apply to the garment. It does not provide the same quality level as a fusible product. Funny.
I think it's important to note that 4Mica was quoting from the link that was posted. I have to admit, at first reading, I thought 4Mica himself was advocating that fusibles are higher quality than non-fusibles...which I'm sure most forum members would have strong opinions about.
post #12 of 14
I guess Wendell Textiles is a little biased
post #13 of 14
I cannot address the origins of fused suits, but I do recall reading a rather lengthy study of the British vs Italian RTW suit industries, in which the author makes a strong case that Italian suits have become a world standard for two reasons: the presence of a smart, adaptable fabric industry in and around Biella, Italy, capable of producing attractive pre-fused technofabrics, and batch-cutting machinery (both blade and laser) that piece cuts suit panels in bulk at high speed.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Joseph Abboud in his recent autobiography Threads states that the technology was pioneered in Germany after World War II
It makes sense that the Nazi's were behind something as evil as fusing.
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