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Ask a Fitness Model - Page 38

post #556 of 962
^yeah, it's retarded. you will just become a skinny-fat.
post #557 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stazy View Post
Why the hell do you want fat instead of muscle???

I would obviously prefer muscle, but I am so thin that I would be happy with 10 lbs of fat.
post #558 of 962
^not making a whole lot of sense. are you too poor for more actual food?
post #559 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by thekunk07 View Post
^not making a whole lot of sense. are you too poor for more actual food?

Since I moved and stopped driving, I rarely get groceries and almost always eat out. My laziness means I skip too many meals...
post #560 of 962
putting on 10 lbs of pure fat is just not smart. You will not be healthier, your clothes will not feel better, you will not feel better, you will not look as good... and announcing such intentions just gets ridicule from e-people. But I guess if you want to be skinny-fat with deteriorating health (is that an ironic hipster thing to do these days?) be my guest.
post #561 of 962
^yeah, the hipster gut cultivation thing i just don't understand.
post #562 of 962
skinny ball crunching jeans with a muffin top is all the rage
post #563 of 962
What would the impact of taking a slow digesting protein before bed be, if I'm trying to lose fat. Should I not eat before bed so that my body will catabolize during sleep and hope that it is fat that is being burned, or should I take casein or something similar so that my body will hopefully build lean muscle mass during sleep....I currently do not eat or take any supplements past my 7-8PM dinner time.
post #564 of 962
Thread Starter 
cottage cheese is good. I can't stand it personally so I take a blended, very low-carb protein with casein. Don't expect to build a lot of (read: any) solid muscle tissue when dieting though, unless you're the rare case that "diets up."
post #565 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by PolePosition View Post
What would the impact of taking a slow digesting protein before bed be, if I'm trying to lose fat. Should I not eat before bed so that my body will catabolize during sleep and hope that it is fat that is being burned, or should I take casein or something similar so that my body will hopefully build lean muscle mass during sleep....I currently do not eat or take any supplements past my 7-8PM dinner time.

There will be no impact. There isn't much of a relationship between protein intake and fat burning. Your body will not "catabolize" during sleep either if you don't take your protein shake or whatever. Protein intake is completely overrated and totally misunderstood in the fitness world. There is pretty much no evidence out there that even proves that increasing your protein intake actually increases muscle mass. Everyone in this thread is stressing way, way too much over protein. We get plenty of it in our diet as it is.
post #566 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by lance konami View Post
...There is pretty much no evidence out there that even proves that increasing your protein intake actually increases muscle mass...

as much as other things are up for debate, and even the exact amount of protein can be disputed, i thought the need for protein to gain lean mass was already pretty well accepted, and while i haven't done intense research i know in my experience this has been the case. i think a lot of people here would disagree with there being "no evidence" linking increased protein intake with an increase in lean muscle mass.
post #567 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by js4design View Post
as much as other things are up for debate, and even the exact amount of protein can be disputed, i thought the need for protein to gain lean mass was already pretty well accepted, and while i haven't done intense research i know in my experience this has been the case. i think a lot of people here would disagree with there being "no evidence" linking increased protein intake with an increase in lean muscle mass.

No evidence. Period. I was as shocked as anyone when I found that out. Check out Brad Pilons book "How much protein?" He goes over tons of regularly cited research used by various supplement companies and basically shows that the only supplement that is actually scientifically proven to increase muscle mass is creatine and anabolic steroids. We need protein of course, but not nearly as much as you think.
post #568 of 962
there were studies that involved prison inmates,and the results disproved a lot of the theories about the need for a lot of protein to build muscle.
post #569 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by lance konami View Post
No evidence. Period. I was as shocked as anyone when I found that out. Check out Brad Pilons book "How much protein?" He goes over tons of regularly cited research used by various supplement companies and basically shows that the only supplement that is actually scientifically proven to increase muscle mass is creatine and anabolic steroids. We need protein of course, but not nearly as much as you think.

Hmm...can you link me to any of these studies? Pretty interesting since everywhere I've read seems to confirm that protein is integral to muscle synthesis.

Here are some studies I found real quick:

Quote:
Orally Administered Leucine Stimulates Protein Synthesis in Skeletal Muscle of Postabsorptive Rats in Association with Increased eIF4F Formation

We investigated the protein synthetic response of skeletal muscle to an orally administered dose of leucine given alone or in combination with carbohydrate. Male rats were freely fed (F) or food deprived for 18 h; food-deprived rats were then administered saline (S), carbohydrate (CHO), leucine (L) or a combination of carbohydrate plus leucine (CL). CHO and CL meals were isocaloric and provided 15% of daily energy requirements. L and CL meals each delivered 270 mg leucine. Muscle protein synthesis in S was 65% of F (P < 0.01) 1 h after meal administration. Concomitant with lower rates of protein synthesis, phosphorylation of the translational repressor, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), was less in S, leading to greater association of 4E-BP1·eIF4E, and reduced formation of the active eIF4G·eIF4E complex compared with F (P < 0.01). Oral administration of leucine (L or CL), but not CHO, restored protein synthesis equal to that in F and resulted in 4E-BP1 phosphorylation that was threefold greater than that of S (P < 0.01). Consequently, formation of 4E-BP1·eIF4E was inhibited and eIF4G·eIF4E was not different from F. The amount of eIF4E in the phosphorylated form was greater in S and CHO (P < 0.01) than in all other groups. In contrast, no differences in the phosphorylation state of eIF2{alpha} or the activity of eIF2B were noted among treatment groups. Serum insulin was elevated 2.6- and 3.7-fold in CHO and CL, respectively, but was not different in L, compared with S (P < 0.05). These results suggest that leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle by enhancing eIF4F formation independently of increases in serum insulin.
post #570 of 962
of course protein is integral to building muscle,but i personally have tried different diets,varied the amount of meals,amount of protein and nutrient timing,and found that the amount of protein that is needed is greatly exaggerated eg 40 grams per meal
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