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Euopean snobbery - Page 3

post #31 of 37
I used to subsidized European vacations by buying Levis 501's in bulk at places like Ross (Dress for Less) at about $20 a pair (usually in sizes 31-33), and selling them to whoever wanted a pair for $60 (equivalent.)  About 20 pairs per trip.  20x$40 = $800.  There were lots of takers; and I thank the French and Germans in particular for paying for my hotel bills, some cool sneakers and some really nice meals I probably couldn't have afforded otherwise.  Did it with some "Replay" jeans too, which was nearly too funny. Then I'd pick up Prada and Armani stuff at the outlets and make some money back homeside (and get the VAT off too.)
post #32 of 37
Hmm, this reminds me. Is there anything I should buy in bulk to take over to Japan? Where would I go about selling it?
post #33 of 37
I used to just sell to fellow hostelers. I also opened up a very illegal stall in Paris once, but bolted quickly when I saw cops around.
post #34 of 37
Quote:
Hmm, this reminds me. Is there anything I should buy in bulk to take over to Japan? Where would I go about selling it?
Just about anything by Louis Vuitton.
post #35 of 37
Quote:
Perhaps Hermes will soon join LV monogrammed goods on the New York sidewalks and on Canal Street on week-ends.
The LV monogram has a high visibility. It is not so much the case for Hermes (except their belts with the H buckle). A monogrammed bag is obvious luxury (or an imitation of it) whereas an Hermes tie is not so obviously expensive. If people want to show off, LV is a suitable choice.
post #36 of 37
I am not quite sure what you might want to bring with you to sell in Japan, J. Given your talent for making thrift store discoveries, you may consider buying retro t-shirts, baseball caps, and jeans to sell to some of the hip shops in Harajuku. (Unfortunately, I am not really enough attuned to prices to know what would move here.) One used to see folks on the street in Japan selling brand name bags and watches. They would have a small portable table, and set up shop near locations that got a lot of foot traffic.  I was once told (but never confirmed) that many were young Israelis.   The story had been that police often turned a blind eye to the practice, and aside from the ocassional payoff to the mafia, things went pretty well for these folks.  Recently there have been news stories of renewed vigor in visa crackdowns.  When I think about it, I haven't seen any of these folks in the last 6 months. There are numerous pawnshops and "recycle" shops in Japan where one can sell and purchase designer goods.  Popular hosts and hostesses apparently get numerous high-priced brand name goods from customers, and they often sell the extras to these shops.  Popular culture is replete with young Japanese men who want to give their lady friends a Bulgari necklace or LV purse, but not wanting to pay full retail, will buy it at one of these shops. A Saturday morning television program recently had a regular segment with an expert in spotting fakes. The expert and a reporter would visit trendy areas of Japan and ask passersby if they would agree to have their Gucci, Prada, or LV item examined.  A great laugh was had when the owner realized that her prized LV clutch or Gucci tote bag was fake. Very often the (usually female) owner would say, "I got this from my husband," or "I got it from the boss as an omiyage from his trip to Hawaii."
post #37 of 37
Quick call to Louis Vuitton's customer service in Paris.   A pleasant lady with very good phone manners explained to me that the reason why they limit the number of bags per person is simply a question of "stock".  On one of their more popular models (she gave a name I didn't catch), for example, they only get 4-5 a day, and if they sell it all to one person, they will start to get complaints from their regular customers, and their reputation might suffer. (I drew the conclusions. She left it at: if we sell all the bags to one person, then we won't have anymore for other people). Similarly, I once tried to talk a small Italian restaurant owner into letting me book all his tables for a particular event. He refused, saying he didn't want to disappoint his regular customers.
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