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post #27616 of 29351

Not feeling like opening the 100th collar style question thread (yet).

 

Whenever I think I have a clear understanding of collars, I keep running into stuff that makes me question myself again...
I get the whole point vs spread discussion, and understand that actually all collars have a spread and points, and that it's more a figure of speech, but here goes.

Please note, I've just grabbed some images from Google, not caring about actual shirt quality or branding.

This is a straight point collar:

 

This is a spread collar:

 

But what is this? I would think it is a semi-spread.
It is listed as a 'traditional point collar' : http://www.bestcustomshirt.com/Traditional-Point-Collar-Dress-Shirts.php

 

 

And what would this be called? Would guess (semi) spread as well?
(I'm trying to get a visual on unbuttoned and folded shirts)

post #27617 of 29351
A rose, by any other name, would it not smell as sweet?
post #27618 of 29351
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post


That's just what shell looks like. You can't fix what's not broken. However, if you walk on polished floors much or at all, I do recommend having the heels changed. They ain't called suicide heels for nothin'- the v-cleats are kind of cool and will make those heels last forever, but the instant you hit a marble floor you'll regret having them.


Right but in playing the ebay game i've come across several lovely shell pairs (that don't fit me). This pair is somehow different, shinier, plasticky-ier. wondering if there's some extra finish on the shell that i should try to remove.  I'll see if I can capture it with pictures when I get back home next week.

post #27619 of 29351
Should I be wary of retail $2,000 Luciano Barbera suits for $500 at Century 21?
post #27620 of 29351
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerigo View Post

Should I be wary of retail $2,000 Luciano Barbera suits for $500 at Century 21?

Buy one for me and I'll check out the quality for you. PM for sizing and shipping details. wink.gif
post #27621 of 29351

I wear a suit or SC/trouser combo on a daily basis and am looking to quickly boost my white dress shirt collection for work.  I noticed JAB had their executive collection buy 1, get 2 free for about $69 or 3 Traveler's for $109.  I'm too lazy to iron so all shirts get dry cleaned after a wear or two depending.  Curious where folks buy their daily wear dress shirts?  I have an 11 month old baby, so can't afford an arm and a leg but also do not want to be rocking Club Room or Stafford any longer...

post #27622 of 29351
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdgreg View Post

Curious where folks buy their daily wear dress shirts?
I have purchased a few JAB dress shirts over the years. All non-iron. They've proven perfectly adequate. Naturally, they're insanely overpriced at their "regular" price, but why would anyone buy anything from JAB at full price? JAB is also very easy when it comes to returns, and there are many JAB stores near me, so anything I might buy from them but not like, I can return without any difficulty. Which is a nice plus.

In the same general price range as JAB, Lands' End dress shirts comprise a large portion of my shirt wardrobe. LE has a number of different "models" of dress shirts, and some appeal to me much more than do others, but I won't fault a company for offering a broad selection from which to choose. Again, extremely good about returns, and one can return items to the local Sears.

Somewhat more expensive (on average - exceptions do exist, particularly given sales and coupons) are Charles Tyrwhitt dress shirts. I find them to be okay. Not a go to place for shirts with button-down collars (which I wear fairly often), but a good place to pick up shirts with French cuffs (which I also wear fairly often).

Finally, Brooks Brothers isn't a bad source of dress shirts, although even on sale they're likely a little more expensive than most of the above. These, along with the aforementioned Lands' End, account for more than half of the shirts hanging in my closet. One can argue that they don't make 'em like they used to, but as my time machine is currently in the shop for repairs, I have to base some decisions on what's available now, and not on what was available years ago.

So those are my 4 sources for everyday, reasonably affordable dress shirts.

I would add that I like traditional-fitting shirts. Therefore, I cannot speak as to which of the above have the most athletic fit, or the closest fit, or whatever. Nor do I have any experience with really wide spread collars.

Also, while ironing a shirt isn't all that difficult or time consuming, if you're dead set on dropping off your shirts at the dry cleaners do bear in mind that dry cleaners can vary wildly in terms of quality. Some will be much harder on your shirts (thus shortening their wearable lifespan) and will do a far inferior pressing job, than will others. In my experience, probably 75% of dry cleaners do a horrible job. A couple of minutes with an iron at home will yield far superior results. Just saying.
post #27623 of 29351
Not sure if this thread is the right place to ask, but I am at the point where I want to start getting into bespoke clothing.
Now, I have no real experience in the field and have read a lot on here and basically consensus is that you will learn on the way and probably regret your first couple of purchases.

I am now on the crossroad of ordering from Luxire (cheaper, but probably lesser quality) or going bespoke with an Italian tailor.
Anyone with any input which way I should go? (I could afford both, but dont want to waste money)
post #27624 of 29351
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spurious View Post

I am now on the crossroad of ordering from Luxire (cheaper, but probably lesser quality) or going bespoke with an Italian tailor.
Anyone with any input which way I should go?
Is this Italian tailor someone local? Because when it comes to bespoke clothing, the ability to visit the tailor a couple of times for fittings and the like is of huge value. Indeed, one could maintain that if you're not visiting the tailor a couple of times, it's not bespoke (in the strictest sense), but the presumably lesser made-to-measure. (Not that made-to-measure is necessarily the wrong choice. It depends.)
Quote:
dont want to waste money
Some would tell you that if you truly don't want to waste money, you should do it right the first time. Even if that means putting in lots of extra hours studying and doing research, spending more money, working closely with a tailor whose advice you trust and who shares many of your personal biases with regard to style and fit, and taking more time for delivery of the finished garment.

Coincidentally, just yesterday I had lunch with an old friend, who recently decided to step up to his dream house. Listening to him talk about considerations involving contractors, real estate brokers, architects, interior designers, landscaping consultants, lawyers, engineers, etc., I was convinced the D-Day invasion involved fewer details. But as he pointed out, if you want it perfect - your own particular vision of perfect - you've got to put in the time and effort. Simply learning enough to know how to make use of the experts - heck, to know which experts to hire - seemed to amount to a second job for him and his wife.

Plenty of other people who want a custom house simply go to a local builder, make a couple of dozen gross architectural, landscaping, and decorating choices, and come out of it with a house they really like, for less money spent, and much less time spent.

True bespoke vs. made-to-measure. It isn't limited to clothing, it seems.
post #27625 of 29351
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post

Is this Italian tailor someone local? Because when it comes to bespoke clothing, the ability to visit the tailor a couple of times for fittings and the like is of huge value. Indeed, one could maintain that if you're not visiting the tailor a couple of times, it's not bespoke (in the strictest sense), but the presumably lesser made-to-measure. (Not that made-to-measure is necessarily the wrong choice. It depends.)
Some would tell you that if you truly don't want to waste money, you should do it right the first time. Even if that means putting in lots of extra hours studying and doing research, spending more money, working closely with a tailor whose advice you trust and who shares many of your personal biases with regard to style and fit, and taking more time for delivery of the finished garment.

Coincidentally, just yesterday I had lunch with an old friend, who recently decided to step up to his dream house. Listening to him talk about considerations involving contractors, real estate brokers, architects, interior designers, landscaping consultants, lawyers, engineers, etc., I was convinced the D-Day invasion involved fewer details. But as he pointed out, if you want it perfect - your own particular vision of perfect - you've got to put in the time and effort. Simply learning enough to know how to make use of the experts - heck, to know which experts to hire - seemed to amount to a second job for him and his wife.

Plenty of other people who want a custom house simply go to a local builder, make a couple of dozen gross architectural, landscaping, and decorating choices, and come out of it with a house they really like, for less money spent, and much less time spent.

True bespoke vs. made-to-measure. It isn't limited to clothing, it seems.

The tailor would not be directly local.

I am usually not the detail obsessed kind of guy. I am fairly easy to please and just want to make a sound decision that makes the most sense longterm.
My problem is mainly where I get a better bang for the buck. I dont want shitty quality, that's the first priority, but value for money comes right afterwards.
I could do it right right from the get go, but I am not sure if I am out of 5000€ before I am finally at the point where I am satisfied with what I get.
With Luxire I would probably be out of 2000€. Difference is that I probably would never ever wear the Luxire stuff again afterwards whereas the former items would still be wearable.
post #27626 of 29351
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdgreg View Post
 

I wear a suit or SC/trouser combo on a daily basis and am looking to quickly boost my white dress shirt collection for work.  I noticed JAB had their executive collection buy 1, get 2 free for about $69 or 3 Traveler's for $109.  I'm too lazy to iron so all shirts get dry cleaned after a wear or two depending.  Curious where folks buy their daily wear dress shirts?  I have an 11 month old baby, so can't afford an arm and a leg but also do not want to be rocking Club Room or Stafford any longer...


I have about 15 JAB non-iron shirts.  They come in 3 different fits.  Once you find the right fit, the shirts are great - very easy to take care of and they look good.  I'm would put them on par with brands like Tyrwhitt and Thomas Pink.  Nothing out of this world, but good for the daily grind.

post #27627 of 29351
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spurious View Post

Not sure if this thread is the right place to ask, but I am at the point where I want to start getting into bespoke clothing.
Now, I have no real experience in the field and have read a lot on here and basically consensus is that you will learn on the way and probably regret your first couple of purchases.

I am now on the crossroad of ordering from Luxire (cheaper, but probably lesser quality) or going bespoke with an Italian tailor.
Anyone with any input which way I should go? (I could afford both, but dont want to waste money)

What exactly is the reason for you to go expensive bespoke? Especially if it's not local?
post #27628 of 29351
Quote:
Originally Posted by acecow View Post

What exactly is the reason for you to go expensive bespoke? Especially if it's not local?

Honestly, I want to get into more expensive clothing but want to avoid as many mistakes as possible.
I am not sure if that answers your question, but ultimately I want to own quality clothing.
post #27629 of 29351

Yeah I don't think you need a specific reason to go bespoke. It's often just better.

post #27630 of 29351
It's a mistake to jump into bespoke, especially not local bespoke, before you're experienced enough in menswear. If you know exactly what your style is down to the shape of your shirt collars and the ideal width of ties and jacket lapels, if you know your measurements and have been successful with online MTM shirts, if, most importantly, your style hasn't changed in the past year or two, then you're ready to spend the big bucks on bespoke. This is my personal opinion, YMMV.

In other words, I'd advise against going bespoke if you're not absolutely sure of every element of your outfit, because bespoke is, essentially, attention to the tiniest details. You can get great fit and workmanship without spending an extra 1K on bespoke if that's your only goal.
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