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Ticket pocket on my Chan suit, or no? - Page 3

post #31 of 40
Thread Starter 
Matadorpoeta, I agree to some extent that they make the suit less formal; but then again it gives it more style, which in a certain way can be more "formal" (I think that you mistake the term "formal" for "conservative" perhaps). I want a business suit that isn't just a dull gray suit. I think that the ticket pocket does that for the suit, which is why I ended up requesting it.
post #32 of 40
Quote:
allow me to rant for a second: i think you guys base too many of your opinions on what has been done historically or on what so so wrote in his book. use YOUR EYES. it is painfully obvious that whether or not one likes ticket pockets, they make the jacket less formal. this is not good or bad, it's just the way things are. decide what degree of formality you want in your suit and that will answer the initial question of this thread.
I don't disagree that one's eyes (and personal style) should be the final judge. I quoted Flusser merely to point out historical precedent for the style, not to adopt his purported rule. I suppose any quotation of him is always flamebait around here so perhaps I should have put in a disclaimer. I generally don't put ticket pockets on any suit intended purely for business wear, but then again I don't stop myself from wearing suits with ticket pockets in a business setting. I don't really care whether people consider them informal or not. Screw the "rules." Today I'm wearing a tieless Ascot Chang blue oxford shirt with a semispread collar and a POCKET and a MONOGRAM ON THE CUFF. Muhahahahahahahah.
post #33 of 40
Quote:
I say go with the ticket pocket. Here's a quick pic of the one of the most recent Chan suits I ordered--I have a couple of hacking/ticket pocket combo suits, but I see no problem doing it on a straight flap pocket.
Hi, I like the suit a lot, but I also like more roll to the lapel. Is this something Chan will do if you specify? Thanks.
post #34 of 40
Thread Starter 
The two button lapel rolls more naturally, and I also found that steaming the underside of the lapels helped immensely, because they get flattened down in packaging. I would say that my Chan has lapels that roll almost as gracefully as my Oxxford. Certainly it rolls better than any Canali or Corneliani I've ever seen.
post #35 of 40
I agree with Matadorpoeta and retronotmetro; both aestethically and historically ticket pocket is for less formal suits. Just imagine it on a Tuxedo, or a Morning Dress; very odd, isnt'it? That said, I also hate rules, everybody do as they like, choose your formal degree you like; and let everybody else judge.
post #36 of 40
Quote:
Quote:
(retronotmetro @ 26 Oct. 2004, 11:22) I say go with the ticket pocket.  Here's a quick pic of the one of the most recent Chan suits I ordered--I have a couple of hacking/ticket pocket combo suits, but I see no problem doing it on a straight flap pocket.
Hi, I like the suit a lot, but I also like more roll to the lapel.  Is this something Chan will do if you specify? Thanks.
By "more roll" do you mean a more pronounced roll (softer roll), or a lapel that rolls lower on the chest (i.e. roll to the second button)? That pic was taken after I took the suit out of the box and hit the coat with a steamer very briefly. The same suit is now back from professional pressing and the lapel roll is much softer and less "pressed flat." As Johnny states, a suit that rolls to the middle button will generally be done with a more pronounced roll, by design.
post #37 of 40
Yeah, I meant a softer, less flat roll. I suppose i like it rolling to the middle button - and you are saying they can do that. Excellent
post #38 of 40
Quote:
That said, I also hate rules, everybody do as they like, choose your formal degree you like; and let everybody else judge.
Hear, hear.
post #39 of 40
There are better cloths than a Loro Piano worsted in my opinion. I would suggest getting a swatch number from the books of the other woolen merchants, give Chan the swatch number, and in many cases they can get it. The Loro Piano and Zegna tailoring cloths are, I think, second tier. The cashmeres are a different story, but also vary a lot in quality. In the US, there were even some Loro Piano domestic milled cloth, I think made in Connecticut. I doubt they are still available. They were dreadful.
post #40 of 40
There was also a discussion of this very thing on askandy.com a while back.   I believe (and I hope that I'll be corrected if mistaken) that the ticket pocket's origins are found on casual (country) clothing.   So in a sense, to put a tick. pock. on a city suit would be a step toward informality, n'est pas?    And in that case, you're conflating of formal and conservative. Wouldn't do would it? I'd be interested to know when the first ticket pocket was put on a city suit. And I suppose, vis a vis the tick pock, one could look at how other once casual elements of the wardrobe have become more formal (or at least less casual) such as the button-down shirt (in America at least) or the bowler hat in England
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