or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about. - Page 130

post #1936 of 3532
Quote:
Originally Posted by Osiris2012 View Post

Score one for fear and ignorance.

Hope it enjoys its one man race to autarky.

 

The biggest flaw in the "Leave" campaign is that the Britain that many of the "Leave" people seem to want back, had already disappeared long before Britain ever joined the EU. 

 

They're welcome to try autarky but the closest that they've had to that in the past several hundred years was during WWII and, as my dad could attest, life was pretty miserable at that time. 

 

As someone else pointed out, the UK had the best of both worlds - it had easy access to the EU markets but it still had its own currency and wasn't a party to the Schengen Agreement so it still controlled its own borders. 

 

The irony is that if the UK wishes to continue trading with EU countries - and almost 50% of all UK trade is done with EU countries - then it will have to meet EU regulations with regard to exports in any case, regardless as to whether it's actually a member of the EU or not. So it will still have to do the things that it did as a member of the EU, but without the preferential trade advantages that it had as a member of the EU. 

 

It will be interesting to see the effect that this will have on London with regard to its current position as the financial capital of Europe. Still, I guess that it might help to make London property a bit more affordable. 

post #1937 of 3532
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

Oh yeah. They will also lose the influx of talent and cultural richness which most other European countries will benefit from, thanks to the current wave of emigration from the Middle East.

That's right. You read it here.

Is this sarcasm
post #1938 of 3532


sad to see the framework for thought and discussion is structured by the mainstream media. Can anyone see positive in this?

post #1939 of 3532
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwMicInAus View Post
 

"They will lose relevance as a financial hub. They will lose the diplomatic clout that comes from being one of the major partners in a very large diplomatic/security bloc. Any manufacturing industry they still have left will quickly disappear as their favourable trading terms dry up."

 

lose relevance as a financial hib? tosh

 

lose diplomatic clout? tosh

 

very large diplomatic/security bloc? tosh

 

manufacturing disapper? tosh

 

favourable trading terms? tosh


OK. You win.

post #1940 of 3532
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwMicInAus View Post
 


sad to see the framework for thought and discussion is structured by the mainstream media. Can anyone see positive in this?


Yes. You can.

post #1941 of 3532
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

I only own a pair of his shoes. They're nice enough but far too narrow for my feet so I'll be unloading them soon.
I thought his main selling point was that you'd get the right fit. Oh well, his prices have gone up anyway.
post #1942 of 3532
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

What do you believe the British (people , not businesses and politicians) have lost ?

This is likely to be a huge storm in a teacup given the uk was never part of the currency or Schengen Agreement and it's hard to see an enormous practical impact since new trade agreements can be hatched

Thank god they were never silly enough to abdicate control of their own currency like the Greeks were (now serfs)

Not to mention it's highly likely that the Eurocrats will largely ignore the referendum as they did to the Greeks

It's main importance is a fuck you to Brussels, and symbolism

 

I certainly agree with the last paragraph. Some British people - still looking backwards and living on past glories - quite reasonably resented what they saw as rule by "faceless Euro bureaucrats" and voted accordingly. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwMicInAus View Post
 


sad to see the framework for thought and discussion is structured by the mainstream media. Can anyone see positive in this?

 

Here's a celebratory article from the UK Telegraph:

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/06/24/this-was-the-day-the-british-people-defied-their-jailers/

 

"What happens now? We drink. We be happy. We sing a song. Then we piece back the country and get on with the great project of building the British century. We voted the right way because we’re a nation with a sense of destiny. The world is ours now. Go get it."

 

Notably, the author of the article conspicuously fails to consider just how not being part of the EU means that "the world is ours now". 

 

Frankly, at the risk of sounding both pessimistic and cynical, I think that the "British century" was the 18th or 19th century, not the 21st or 22nd century...

post #1943 of 3532
Re Brexit I think its a great example for compulsory voting.

Scotland declare indépendance and the North will vote to join the South for a united Eire.

Well the dust will have to settle but a many legal firms will be salivating at the billable hours involved in negotiating the required legal changes for this divorce.

I think xenophobia and the Syrian exodus has played a large part of in the blue collar vote turning out for No.

I had to laugh at a photo of leave supporter in the Australian clutching a can of Kronenbourg 1664 in celebration, but then it could have been made in the UK under licence. If so the UK brewery will no doubt close with the loss of blue collar jobs and the price will increased due to new tariffs and import duties in the coming years.

Edit; the biggest joke is that the UK could end up with Boris Johnson as PM.

Personally I think its divine justice for the Poms winning the Rugby test series.
Edited by Geoffrey Firmin - 6/24/16 at 5:28pm
post #1944 of 3532
I do think that, once things calm down, we'll all see not much will actually change for the UK over the long term (apart from public servants/politicians having to go through a lot of paperwork and do a lot of negotiating). For everyone else, things will eventually return to normal once all the dust has settled. I doubt the British century will come again anytime soon, nor do I think the sky will cave in because of Brexit.
post #1945 of 3532
Thread Starter 
It's scary to see that the older generation can decide a future for the younger one that they clearly doesn't want.
post #1946 of 3532
Oh well, maybe it's a bit of payback, as the youngins have been telling the oldies what to do for awhile now. Old people have as much of a say as anyone else.
post #1947 of 3532
I think the UK is going to get some pretty unfavourable terms in trade negotiations with the EU, would be in the interest of the EU to make an example to deter further potential secessions.
post #1948 of 3532
^lol yes keep the jackboot on their throats

The globalist future
post #1949 of 3532
Globalization isn't an ordained outcome that can take no going backwards, we've had 3 waves of it for a reason.

Trade doesn't have to be stifled but if there's no perceived cost to leaving than other countries will be more open to such adventures. The common currency wont stop ignorant citizens from voting to leave.
post #1950 of 3532
Why SHOULD people be discouraged from leaving ?

Why shouldn't they leave if they wish to and Who's agenda does it suit to intimidate them into not doing so

This seems the antithesis of democracy using financial oppression to strip people of national identity and self determination
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about.