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Yohji, Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love The Looser Fit (Yohji Yamamoto Thread) - Page 323

post #4831 of 5741
Great stuff here lately!
Very nice to see AW and SS fits, truly a global thread nod[1].gif

David, thanks for you review and sizing advice on the SS12 Double Cardigan. Received it the other day, great piece.
post #4832 of 5741
still looking for an answer:
Quote:
Originally Posted by diniro View Post

looking for an interview/article (I'm sure was with Yohji) where he discusses how seasonal trends are set, and breaks down designer' runway shows by percentages by stuffs they think will sale, stuffs they want to make, ect.

anyone have any clue what i'm talking about?
post #4833 of 5741
Thread Starter 
Huh...don't think I remember reading any interview like that diniro. I originally thought it might have been the one he did with Azzedine Alaia, but only a passing mention was made to something similar where Yohji said:
Quote:
"Fashion consists of both commerce and creation. You need to find the right balance, if not you cannot continue. Though I will always defend a very pure creation, I should not forget that I am responsible for the jobs of the five hundred people working for Yohji Yamamoto."

You sure he was the one?
post #4834 of 5741
Thread Starter 
I don't think this version of the video has been posted before on here.

Full show for AW2010 4.1 The Men.

post #4835 of 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by diniro View Post

still looking for an answer:

Maybe you're thinking of the Mekas interview with Takeji Hirakawa?
Quote:
In Kenzo and Miyake's time, "fashion design" meant "license business."

When Yohji Yamamoto and Comme des Garçons appeared, they mostly obsessed over their own image, and because of that, their image became part of their corporate "holdings." They wanted to direct their own business, and so they created distance from the license business. And they took all the risk themselves when they went to Paris.

Jun Takahashi is similar. He only runs his own brand. He is risking the whole game on one bet. It takes a lot of money every year to show in Paris twice. He is always working hard to find his own originality.

For example, there is a big difference between the brands Number Nine and Undercover. They are both of the same fashion DJ generation, where there are no possibilities of "new" creations. Designers make three types of clothes: things they want to make, things they want to sell, and things that they think will sell well. So when I see a show, I judge the proportion of these three categories in the show's clothing. For Comme des Garçons, 80% is what she wants to make. The other 20% is things she wants to sell, but they are mostly inner-wear pieces you don't see in the show.

Undercover is always 70% things Takahashi wants to make and 30% clothes the brand wants to sell. Number Nine, on the other hand, is made up of 70% clothes they want to sell and 30% of clothes that they think will sell well. There's a real difference between the two brands.

Another thing is that Takahashi's "creative world" comes from the typical Japanese streets. So everyone is anticipating that he will show how far original Japanese street casual fashion can penetrate into the big fashion world of Paris. Unfortunately, Comme des Garçons has become too large of a company to really to play the insurgent role. Kawakubo has gotten older, so she's brought in Junya Watanabe on deck and Tao Kunio at third-at-bat. She's creating a whole team.

I think Jun Takahashi is amazing that he's come this far for being basically just another little punk from the streets. He has used his own money and has persevered by his own will-power. I think he is very earnest. Everyone else is cashing in, but he has created such goodwill by his sheer force alone. As a journalist, I believe I should be assisting young designers, and I want to see how far Japan can slice itself into the current system.
post #4836 of 5741
that's it. Thank you syed.
post #4837 of 5741
Thread Starter 
Man, that article is all kinds of depressing. I mean, one tends to discuss this death of originality and honesty in what I guess is considered "modern day" design and art etc. but to read it laid out in such a matter-of-fact way really brings it home.

Quote:
No, there was a gap. The fashion world, along with the economy, has become globalized. Look at production: in the past, if Dior wasn't made in France, it wasn't Dior. Now all the French factory does is make the "aesthetics" for Dior. Dior goods have such media power that products made in Hong Kong, China, and Africa all sell well just by attaching the Dior brand.

The way of looking at fashion after globalization in the 21st century is what I think of as "fashion DJs." There is no way to make anything new, in a creative sense. I think that "creation" completely ended in the 15-20 years I have been watching fashion since 1985. As long as the human body does not change, there are no more ways to create anything new. If we started to have three or four arms, then creations would change. But that's not going to happen.

In our era, the designers' job is just "sampling" of the past or "remixing" or "remodeling."

I believe that there used to be "fashion creators" who lived in their own world and made their own creations. Then when Tom Ford showed up in 1992, we got a new category of "fashion directors," who do merchandising for brands based on an specific image. Tom Ford has never studied fashion himself, but he doesn't need to know anything about fashion design. He can say, "This is what's right for our era" and direct the creation of cool things and work towards a "Gucci" flavor. That is what a fashion director does.

Now we have Raf Simons. He works for Jil Sander just as a fashion director. A year before he worked for Jil Sander, he was a visiting fashion professor at the University of Applied Arts at Vienna. When he got the Jil Sander job, he brought together all the young students and teachers around him and formed a team to send things to Jil Sander. The directors now sit in between those actually sew the clothes and the designers.


Nobody can afford to be creative for the sake of being creative and still have an impact any more. The costs of being seen are just too high. People like Yohji who worked their way up have the cache to put their ideas front and center, but like even he said in the interview below, it is definitely a lot more difficult for younger designers.



One hopes the "new wind" really blows and provides viable alternate avenues for the new blood to come in.

Thanks for posting syed and thanks for asking about it diniro, hehe.
post #4838 of 5741

.

post #4839 of 5741

I wonder where the %s come from for how much a designer wants to make vs sell

 

it's hard to accept that CDG is 80/20 in favor of making, unless this is not considering it as the CDG umbrella that encompasses all the random collections and collabs with other labels that are really just a sticker placed on...

 

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivwri View Post

Man, that article is all kinds of depressing. I mean, one tends to discuss this death of originality and honesty in what I guess is considered "modern day" design and art etc. but to read it laid out in such a matter-of-fact way really brings it home.
Nobody can afford to be creative for the sake of being creative and still have an impact any more. The costs of being seen are just too high. People like Yohji who worked their way up have the cache to put their ideas front and center, but like even he said in the interview below, it is definitely a lot more difficult for younger designers.
 

to what extent do you think it was affordable before? i think there's something to be said about the concept of "starving artist" which has existed for how long i don't know. it's perhaps a reasonable statement, meaning even more difficult now to persist via some creative outlet. 

 

i also think shrunken societal attention spans--always craving newer and more exciting--have a share in the blame, due in part to the very technologies that allow for more creativity to begin with. 

 

post #4840 of 5741
Thread Starter 
When I say it was more affordable, what I mean is that the barriers (both financial and creative) to entry were lower. The gatekeepers were not as entrenched and there was just not as much money to be made in the business as there is now. Now that commercial concerns are so much more pronounced and the entire system seems to require a hell of a lot more money to remain in business, it is very difficult to just focus on being a "starving artist" as it were. Unless one is lucky and/or has the design chops of a Maurizio Altieri/Carol Christian Poell/Aitor Throup and can afford to produce a few items to be sold to patron saint-style retailers or customers directly at huge prices, to be a starving artist nowadays is to have your work not be seen by many people.

Not to say it was not expensive and difficult before, but I imagine that production for example, was not as crazy as it is now thanks to the likes of H&M, Zara and the huge fashion conglomerates that have made the manufacturers used to higher volumes.

Then there is also the problem of creativity and boredom. Back in the 80s when Yohji and Rei first came to Paris, they had shock value and could ride on that. Nowadays, due to globalisation, being "exotic" and "fresh" is way more difficult because everybody is jaded. These terms are just yet more buzzwords for the media mill. To be truly original anymore you really have to have some way of paying for it - for example, see Aitor Throup and his taking of 8 years to perfect the production model for a bag - and being able to survive in that interim somehow.

Like you rightly pointed out, there is also the issue of -
Quote:
shrunken societal attention spans--always craving newer and more exciting--have a share in the blame, due in part to the very technologies that allow for more creativity to begin with.

the internet for example, allows for makers of all sorts to reach a much larger audience free from the restrictions of the "gatekeepers". However, not all makers are media savvy and can utilise this medium to their advantage and even if they can, there is always the problem of dealing with an increasingly fickle audience that is becoming less and less interested in anything with depth and becoming more comfortable with superficial cultural interfacing. The interview linked to by syed addressed this very well I thought by highlighting how the tension between "doers" and "onlookers" is what helped generate culture and content in Japan. By extension, this same tension should be what allows makers to proliferate and find an audience (I guess fringe vs mainstream is also a good parallel to this), but now that that tension is getting weaker as the generations pass by (fringe almost becomes mainstream overnight and vice versa), it is simultaneously getting easier to find an audience and harder to keep them long term. Both because the consumers are more fickle and the makers are becoming shallower and shallower as their frames of reference have become too flat due to technology making it too easy to acquire "inspiration" and knowledge.

No more tension.

I think Yohji is still one of the greats simply because when he first started out he really saw a clear vision of his design universe and is still inhabiting that space even now. He generates his own friction by challenging himself and "looking to the past".
post #4841 of 5741

A picture taken last weekend when I visited Atelier New York (doing their client style thing).

My facial expression looks weird but clothes look okay.

 

Reinhard Plank hat, Kuboraum glasses, Yohji Yamamoto long jacket, knit and pants. Onitsuka Tiger Sneakers

 

 

http://ateliernewyork.com/2013/04/24/client-style-no-19-matt-r/

 

And what I wore today.

One of the best suits he has done IMO and one of the best I own as well. DR YY Suit in Silk/Cotton

 

Untitled

 

Fabric

http://www.flickr.com/photos/54691214@N02/8681675971/

post #4842 of 5741

I noticed Amazon UK is doing a pretty decent 70% off sale on shoes from the Old Curiosity Shop in London - the designer, Daita Kimura, has collaborated with Yohji in the past, (runway gear, and as a designer, the aesthetic fits). If anyone knows more I've long wondered what precise form their work together took.

 

But anyway. Amazing shoes. The shop in London is insaaaaane. (The extra a's are justified) 

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=sr_nr_n_0?rh=n%3A355005011%2Ck%3Aold+curiosity+shop&keywords=old+curiosity+shop&ie=UTF8&qid=1366952799&rnid=1642204031


Edited by StevenE - 4/25/13 at 10:33pm
post #4843 of 5741

the only photos i took from last night. the rest are on film which i will try and develop asap. the show as epic with capital E. i hope the video show up soon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #4844 of 5741

Looked like a super venue :) 

 

Were they bespoke YYF pieces for the show or part of AW13? 

post #4845 of 5741

archive show. back from 97 till 12..

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