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Suitsupply NYC - Page 215

post #3211 of 6245
Quote:
Originally Posted by othertravel View Post

What percentage of poly are we talking about? Even Loro Piana has stretch fabrics with 2% elastine. I've even seen Polo RL pieces with 20% polyamide (flannels).

That said, let's see how far they'll take it before we judge.


True. I have an odd jacket from Loro Piana mainline that has 1% elastane in it. Fantastic feel to the fabric and one of my nicer pieces. Depending on the item, a percent or two can be fine.
post #3212 of 6245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

True. I have an odd jacket from Loro Piana mainline that has 1% elastane in it. Fantastic feel to the fabric and one of my nicer pieces. Depending on the item, a percent or two can be fine.

Wool with a higher thread count can wrinkle very easily. If you travel alot in suits, 1 or 2% is fine. But 20% is excessive.

I asked one of the SF tailors about that, and he said that polyamide is used to stabilize fine fabrics. But he also said 20% is very high. Never seen an LP fabric with more than 3%.
post #3213 of 6245
Quote:
Originally Posted by So(cal)Steezy View Post

I need another work suit. I own a royal blue suit and it's somewhat flashy, so I can only get away with it once a week. I could use a navy suit, but think one of these will do for now.

So I need....
1. A fabric which can be worn regularly.
2. A more casual look as my office is business casual normally....I just like suits.
3. Fabric for a decently warm climate - it never gets that cold in Los Angeles.

If what you have is already to flashy, then you may pigeonhole yourself again by purchasing one of the 3 peak lapel suits. Why not a standard issue navy followed by a standard issue mid-grey?

Quote:
Originally Posted by terty View Post

Hey guys I just received my suit (Navy napoli) and I really like the cut and colour. One problem i've found is that the width of the arm is quite wide, meaning theres a lot of excess material. Just wondering if a tailor can actually fix that and whether it will affect the suit a lot?

I have had a couple of jacket sleeves slimmed. Nothing overly aggressive, but trimmed. I would personally say have it done or send it back. If you keep it and dont' touch the sleeves, you may find yourself unhappy with the jacket every time you put it on, and you won't wear it confidently.
Edited by CousinDonuts - 9/4/13 at 12:26pm
post #3214 of 6245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by othertravel View Post

What percentage of poly are we talking about? Even Loro Piana has stretch fabrics with 2% elastine. I've even seen Polo RL pieces with 20% polyamide (flannels).

That said, let's see how far they'll take it before we judge.


True. I have an odd jacket from Loro Piana mainline that has 1% elastane in it. Fantastic feel to the fabric and one of my nicer pieces. Depending on the item, a percent or two can be fine.

 

As long as it's made clear to the buyer, which is not the case here.

post #3215 of 6245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomek View Post

As long as it's made clear to the buyer, which is not the case here.

Can't blame them; it sounds bad.
post #3216 of 6245
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesman528 View Post


I don't like stretch fabrics (a suit should get well cut enough that the stretch feature is never needed) but 2 or 4% elasthan is generally okay. We are talking here about 20%.

 

Where is the fabric composition label indicating 20% elastane? That sounds suspiciously like someone's mixing up numbers. A jacket with 1% elastane has a subtle give to it. 4% elastane is quite obviously stretchy. 20% is bike shorts territory. 

post #3217 of 6245

I just received my Soho Jacket. This is my first double breasted jacket, so I'd like some feedback on the fit. It's a 40L. Sorry about the glare, it was really sunny out.

 

post #3218 of 6245
Originally Posted by bluesman528 View Post

The point is, polyamide or polyester is not needed in any quality fabric. When it's there it is only for cost cutting reasons. Who cares if there are other fashion labels who use that, too? Suitsupply did not need it before and they do not need it now. I can see why Suitsupply is trying to use more of these fabrics but why should anyone here defend this?

 

Suitsupply is a cheap source of a large range of nicely-styled items that bridge the gap between contemporary & traditional quite nicely. They no doubt know that for most of their customers, price point is absolutely key. As you yourself noted in another post, the cost of natural materials is rising and it's likely to continue to do so. In order to maintain/grow profit margins while not raising prices, SS probably needed to introduce some cheaper fabrics into the range. Their introduction effectively subsidises the other clothes that aren't poly-blended. If that's the case, then yes, I would defend it, as it maintains at least some supply of nicely-fitting, natural fabric clothes. Frankly, even if a quarter of the range had to be poly-blended to maintain the other 75% being natural, and kept at the same pricepoint, I'd accept that trade-off easily.

 

Obviously, I don't have access to their accounts to know if they're cross-subsidising in this way or simply padding profits, but in the absence of fact and given what we do know about rising costs, it seems reasonable to give them the benefit of the doubt.

 

I do think full disclosure is important, so the customer can choose according to their own priorities. SS seem to be doing that with their most recent update.

 

Originally Posted by DrBi0 View Post
 

I just received my Soho Jacket. This is my first double breasted jacket, so I'd like some feedback on the fit. It's a 40L. Sorry about the glare, it was really sunny out.

Difficult to tell without a full-length pic, but I don't think it flatters you. Makes you look a bit pear-shaped. I think it would need to be a little longer to avoid that (and probably a somewhat more structured shoulder).

post #3219 of 6245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post
 

Difficult to tell without a full-length pic, but I don't think it flatters you. Makes you look a bit pear-shaped. I think it would need to be a little longer to avoid that (and probably a somewhat more structured shoulder).

Taking it in at the sides a bit might help as well.

post #3220 of 6245

Do you think a 38L would look better?

post #3221 of 6245

Anyone know if the Sevilla cut has slimmer sleeves than the Napoli?

post #3222 of 6245
Quote:
Originally Posted by katabatic View Post

Where is the fabric composition label indicating 20% elastane? That sounds suspiciously like someone's mixing up numbers. A jacket with 1% elastane has a subtle give to it. 4% elastane is quite obviously stretchy. 20% is bike shorts territory. 
I was talking of 20% polyamide or polyester. The elastane example was not mine, it should only point out that there are certain amounts of man-made fibers acceptable in a cloth (what is true, but not a sign of a really good fabric).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

Suitsupply is a cheap source of a large range of nicely-styled items that bridge the gap between contemporary & traditional quite nicely. They no doubt know that for most of their customers, price point is absolutely key. As you yourself noted in another post, the cost of natural materials is rising and it's likely to continue to do so. In order to maintain/grow profit margins while not raising prices, SS probably needed to introduce some cheaper fabrics into the range. Their introduction effectively subsidises the other clothes that aren't poly-blended. If that's the case, then yes, I would defend it, as it maintains at least some supply of nicely-fitting, natural fabric clothes. Frankly, even if a quarter of the range had to be poly-blended to maintain the other 75% being natural, and kept at the same pricepoint, I'd accept that trade-off easily.

Obviously, I don't have access to their accounts to know if they're cross-subsidising in this way or simply padding profits, but in the absence of fact and given what we do know about rising costs, it seems reasonable to give them the benefit of the doubt.

I do think full disclosure is important, so the customer can choose according to their own priorities. SS seem to be doing that with their most recent update.
As long as the poly blends are restricted to a small percentage of their whole product range I would have no problem with that. But frankly I can't see that happen in the long run. Either the poly blends are not that commercially successful (then these products will not contribute enough to a mixed calculation and they need another strategy) or they are and why should they pass on the possible profits then and not extend the poly blend article range while their customers like to buy them?

I'm totally selfish here, I know that. Suitsupply is a clothing company with a good amount of quality for comparably little money. I would say, it has a unique selling proposition in this regard (some will say, hey, you can buy this or that label for 70% off during sales, but that is not the same and it does not work most of the time even for the same people who say that). If Suitsupply reduces the quality aspect they are no longer interesting for me and there are not that many alternatives besides spending substantially more for the same quality..

In the end this is Styleforum. I would hope that there are more people here who have the same motivations and are not satisfied with a cheap, fashionable suit regardless of quality. It is possibly a lot more lucrative to be H&M than Suitsupply if you have the right type of customer and you can work on a big scale. But there is already too much H&M and the likes in the world, we don't need another one.

But now enough of my rant, I don't want to disturb the party any longer. smile.gif
post #3223 of 6245
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesman528 View Post


I was talking of 20% polyamide or polyester. The elastane example was not mine, it should only point out that there are certain amounts of man-made fibers acceptable in a cloth (what is true, but not a sign of a really good fabric).
As long as the poly blends are restricted to a small percentage of their whole product range I would have no problem with that. But frankly I can't see that happen in the long run. Either the poly blends are not that commercially successful (then these products will not contribute enough to a mixed calculation and they need another strategy) or they are and why should they pass on the possible profits then and not extend the poly blend article range while their customers like to buy them?

I'm totally selfish here, I know that. Suitsupply is a clothing company with a good amount of quality for comparably little money. I would say, it has a unique selling proposition in this regard (some will say, hey, you can buy this or that label for 70% off during sales, but that is not the same and it does not work most of the time even for the same people who say that). If Suitsupply reduces the quality aspect they are no longer interesting for me and there are not that many alternatives besides spending substantially more for the same quality..

In the end this is Styleforum. I would hope that there are more people here who have the same motivations and are not satisfied with a cheap, fashionable suit regardless of quality. It is possibly a lot more lucrative to be H&M than Suitsupply if you have the right type of customer and you can work on a big scale. But there is already too much H&M and the likes in the world, we don't need another one.

But now enough of my rant, I don't want to disturb the party any longer. smile.gif

 

You know what, I'm actually hoping that SS will go full poly blends. As soon as they do that, they've left their original niche and entered a new one, meaning there's a huge gap in the market. That's when I'll enter the market. Suitsupply was founded by a Dutch guy, I see no reason why a similar company couldn't be started by another Dutch guy.

post #3224 of 6245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkeyface View Post

You know what, I'm actually hoping that SS will go full poly blends. As soon as they do that, they've left their original niche and entered a new one, meaning there's a huge gap in the market. That's when I'll enter the market. Suitsupply was founded by a Dutch guy, I see no reason why a similar company couldn't be started by another Dutch guy.

I might try to beat you to it! devil.gif
post #3225 of 6245
Quote:
Originally Posted by terty View Post

Anyone know if the Sevilla cut has slimmer sleeves than the Napoli?

Go to the gym. Eat more protein.
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