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Are Sharp Dressers Born or Made? (Question from a newbie) - Page 4

post #46 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loathing View Post
Just like any sport: you can be taught all the rules and a few tips and tricks, but that won't make you a star player.

simply put.

when you learn the rules, and have the funds and retail outlets to support it, you will be efficient and look well turned out almost always ... i think that goes for most SFers.

however, there is a rare majority who possess a certain je ne sais quoi that allows them to go to the next level by defying the rules and still looking dapper consistently, irrespective of financial and retail outlet constraints.

that cannot be taught.
post #47 of 61
Like any natural ability it is inherent within the individual and over time and practice it becomes their "style" or trademark.
post #48 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by PTWilliams View Post
In particular, per Sanguis Moruum's advice, I've taken to wearing paper bags instead of Juicy Couture and this has resulted on my making funny sounds when I walk or sit down, and I am in a desperate state because when I go to the urinal, I pull down my zipper and there is no way for me to "extract that which much be extracted" to relieve myself. There is nothing but a solid wall of brown paper.


post #49 of 61
Of course they're made, mostly. But introversion (which to some extent is innate) and thriftiness do seem to be common hindrances. What the original post is mostly about is self-motivation. First of all, knowing how style can affect career advancement and income should motivate. Clearly, style affects romantic success, which is just as important to most men. Another way to approach it is internally, as maybe introverts tend to do. Using style to feel better about the self, indulge personal interests (for example, a love of color, or fabric or certain sub-cultures), or to resist conformity. The problem is when that goes overboard, such as when people on sites encouraging each other to dress purely for themselves and basically ignore real-world perceptions. Another self-motivational strategy is competing against the self or others to buy quality items for the least money possible, but that risks buying too many items that don't go well together, being ripped off, etc. One key point - it helps to be aware of how one feels and the reactions he receives depending on how is he dressed. (That also is linked to basic personality, but one can increase awareness - or of course ask for feedback.) Knowledge tends to prompt action.
post #50 of 61
Interesting topic - I was just thinking about this the other day.

For whatever reason, I have always taken an interest in getting dressed up, especially in suits. Far more than any of my brothers, of which I have four. I even recall when I was like in 4th or 5th grade, I had one suit that my parents got me for special occasions. I recall wanting to wear that thing every chance I got. I remember a few times putting it on just for the sake of putting it on.

Guess its always been with me.
post #51 of 61
Made. But some are have more natural talent than others.
post #52 of 61
Nature is in so far as being born with a well balanced body, a decent face, and not color blind.

Everything else is learned. No one is born with a great sense of fashion only great body and great features.
post #53 of 61
Mostly made, obviously. Few little boys have an innate desire to dress up. Mostly, it is burdensome to them. I can recall one time my mother got me all dressed up in a little white suit for some special occasion, and for some reason I can't articulate at this late date, I jumped in our slimy fishpond! She beat me and beat me and beat me some more for that, which was her usual way of discipline. I can't say that I blame her for that one!

However, as others have pointed out, some people are naturally gifted with physiques that make them look sharp in dressy clothes. I think President Obama is a good example of this. I don't think he is a very knowledgeable dresser, and he makes some egregious stylistic errors, yet most people rate him as a sharp dresser. On the other hand, Rod Blagojevich has a much finer wardrobe than Obama and is evidently a more knowledgeable sartorialist, yet he doesn't look particularly elegant. (The haircut doesn't help.)

In conclusion, I would say that sharp dressing results from a fusion of natural physical gifts (exercise can be very remedial here), desire, knowledge and means. Whether there is such a thing as innate good taste or good taste osmotically acquired from a genteel, aesthetic upbringing, I am not sure. I have known a number of men with impeccably patrician antecedents who are tasteless, horrible dressers.

Means I would rate very low on the scale of importance. A wardrobe can and should be built up gradually and piecemeal. Unless one is sunk in abject poverty, one can acquire good clothing and shoes and be very well turned out, certainly compared to most of the male populace. Compared to many hobbies, sartorialism is really relatively inexpensive.
post #54 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
Means I would rate very low on the scale of importance. A wardrobe can and should be built up gradually and piecemeal. Unless one is sunk in abject poverty, one can acquire good clothing and shoes and be very well turned out, certainly compared to most of the male populace. Compared to many hobbies, sartorialism is really relatively inexpensive.

This gives me hope, and yet I'm afraid that spending time here is, as most of us know, a double-edged sword. An expensive double-edged sword.


'scuse me, I have to go check the buy and sell...
post #55 of 61
I don't know anyone who rates Pres. Obama as a sharp dresser and that includes him. He has perfected the snoozeworthy 'politician bland' of navy/charcoal suit and white shirt with black shoes. When trying to look more casual for a speech to working men he will lose the jacket and tie and roll up his sleeves. We all remember the windbreaker and dad jeans. Other than perhaps his occasional tie choices I can't think of anything which makes him stand out clothes-wise from the sea of blandness on capital hill. Very poor example. he even admits he hates shopping and has no interest in clothes.
post #56 of 61
I will add my 5cents worth and note that not only is it an enjoyable challenge to re-invent yourself with your clothes and who you are; but also, note that you will need to re-adjust your confidence because people will notice and generally better dressed people do stand out amongst slobs...be it at work, home, or a social setting.

I recently purchased umm a pinkstriped shirt. (Now I dont expect you to do this is) The guy who sold it to me was a New Yorker a long way from home. He looked me up and down basically said to me "who cares what other people think if you can pull the look you have on off then you can pull almost anything off". (I was in a dark blue suit, white and light blue chequered shirt and a red stripped tie during my lunch break).

The point is go for it i.e. As others have posted look at what others are wearing + think about who you are and what you want to say. You will develop into your own style.
post #57 of 61
Sharp dressers are generally well-financed.
post #58 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Carlos View Post
As an infant I wore diapers, which led to many accusations that I dressed "like an old man."

post #59 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellyhungry View Post
Sharp dressers are generally well-financed.

myth.
post #60 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by niidawg3 View Post
myth.
+1

It doesn't take much money to be stylish ... although it can help expand the options.
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