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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 982

post #14716 of 19038
How often could I use a product like Renovator?

I have one pair of shells and a few pairs of calf and wanted to find one good product, such as Renovator, to use on all across the board. Looking for a few really good products rather than buying 20 products to start out.
post #14717 of 19038
Sometimes I have found a toothpick is not enough. I use a needle to break up the wax or the tip of a fine knife. You do have to be very careful but honestly working with a small hole you won't put enough pressure to really to any damage. Still if you have that much built up hardened wax then you probably haven't kept up with the maintenance of your shoes. Of course there are always exceptions.
post #14718 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Ask Alexandre Nurulaef and Ron Rider on how to do so. Renomat can be used as a soap and cleans way better as a soap.

As of the brogue holes, one should try to clean them, not enlarge nor shear them.

A product that I have been liking for stripping is Leather Doctor's degreaser. It is naphtha based, but it has some additives that makes the emulsion a pH of 2.2. This is good because has you're stripping it keeps the pH in check and protonates the leather.

I wouldn't classify Renomat as a type of soap. It is largely acetone. It will get soap-like if agitated enough, but it's a solvent, no two ways about it.

I've never cleaned brougeing holes and would even go as far to say that if you have to you're probably using too much of whatever is clogging them.
post #14719 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


A product that I have been liking for stripping is Leather Doctor's degreaser. It is naphtha based, but it has some additives that makes the emulsion a pH of 2.2. This is good because has you're stripping it keeps the pH in check and protonates the leather.

I wouldn't classify Renomat as a type of soap. It is largely acetone. It will get soap-like if agitated enough, but it's a solvent, no two ways about it.

I've never cleaned brougeing holes and would even go as far to say that if you have to you're probably using too much of whatever is clogging them.

I don't have any brogues, but I do agitate Renomat for more effectiveness. Somehow just rubbing them around does not remove a thing. How is the Doctor's Degreaser like, though? Emulsified, or solvent? I heard naphtha is awful on leather.

 

If I DO have brogue shoes, however, I would apply polish with a dauber, because in that application type, the polish will be thoroughly coated inside the holes, not merely coated the outside, then having to deal with clogging effect.

post #14720 of 19038
I don't really know the difference between solvents in terms of leather, but I can't imagine any of them are particularly "good" for it. Anything that is better is probably less effective at either cutting grease, or distributing wax honestly. The degreaser is kind of like a gel. Doesn't strip as well as Renomat, or even pure orange oil or turpentine. All of those pure solvents don't have a pH, but degreaser is an emulsion that does, which is what makes me lean towards it. I am sure the other solvents have some sort of acidic/basic characteristic, but it's not on the same scale as pH because they are non-ionic. Of the pure ones I would lean towards orange oil for the fact alone that it inherently has a more acidic characteristic.
post #14721 of 19038
Few will welcome this observation / advice but with brogued shoes the best way to apply polish or cream is with your fingers. Yes, your fingers will get stained...unless you use rubber or latex gloves (available at the big box stores in reusable quantities of a dozen for less than the cost of a jar of shoe cream) but fingers..even latex gloved fingers...is the only way to apply really thin coats such that the broguing never becomes clogged.

Actually now that I think about it, short of bulling, the best way to apply polish or cream to any shoe...brogued or not...is with fingers.
post #14722 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Stemo, interesting fact that may probably save Pat:

 

_Kiwi polish used to be made out of vinegar, blacking (soot), wax, and sugar.

_Way before Kiwi polish existed, cooking grease, of pure beef tallow or mutton suet, was also used sparingly on footwear to preserve the leather.

_There are also phenomenon of using olive oil on boots as well. I used to try, but it was unimpressive. 

_Many German shoe care products actually used vinegar and ammonia, namely, Tapir leather care. 

 

Two cents that are worth sharing. Enjoy!

 



When I was playing soccer in college, people were still largely wearing leather shoes. As most of the team was foreign, I was exposed to a lot of leather products from all over the world. Our Yugoslavian number 10, Nicola, had a black cream of some sort that he put on his boots that smelled like a combination of rotting corpse, burning tire and getting punched in the face.

While this was 15 years ago, reading your post reminded me of it and I could literally smell it sitting at my desk at work...
post #14723 of 19038

hello guys, i have a pair of dress shoes ( calf leather) that I applied a layer of shoes paste and then for some reason ( actually i do not know myself)  store them without brushing,, only accidentally find these last weekend.

 

It's been 2 years! OMG.

 

My gentleman, you know a good way to get rid of the residues of the paste? will this badly effect the quality of leather? any ways to help my shoes a bit?

 

Thanks for your input!

post #14724 of 19038
@DWFII speaks the truth. Use your digits; they work best. Nitrile gloves or the equivent keep your fingers clean.
post #14725 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by thinntall View Post
 

hello guys, i have a pair of dress shoes ( calf leather) that I applied a layer of shoes paste and then for some reason ( actually i do not know myself)  store them without brushing,, only accidentally find these last weekend.

 

It's been 2 years! OMG.

 

My gentleman, you know a good way to get rid of the residues of the paste? will this badly effect the quality of leather? any ways to help my shoes a bit?

 

Thanks for your input!

 

Id give them a brisk brush first and if that doesnt work Renomat should do the trick.

post #14726 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I don't really know the difference between solvents in terms of leather, but I can't imagine any of them are particularly "good" for it. Anything that is better is probably less effective at either cutting grease, or distributing wax honestly. The degreaser is kind of like a gel. Doesn't strip as well as Renomat, or even pure orange oil or turpentine. All of those pure solvents don't have a pH, but degreaser is an emulsion that does, which is what makes me lean towards it. I am sure the other solvents have some sort of acidic/basic characteristic, but it's not on the same scale as pH because they are non-ionic. Of the pure ones I would lean towards orange oil for the fact alone that it inherently has a more acidic characteristic.

I hear ya. This is why many companies strive to design a cleaner with a pH scale, regardless whether if it is true, or suitable for leather - thinking Lexol's "soap" and the new "degreaser". I think at some point I'll give that degreaser a try. As of solvents, they evaporate too fast for an accurate measurement of pH scale, however, I vaguely recall Glen spoke of Orange oil's pH, which is suitable for both chrome and veg leathers (information remains unconfirmed for the sake of source reliability). 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Few will welcome this observation / advice but with brogued shoes the best way to apply polish or cream is with your fingers. Yes, your fingers will get stained...unless you use rubber or latex gloves (available at the big box stores in reusable quantities of a dozen for less than the cost of a jar of shoe cream) but fingers..even latex gloved fingers...is the only way to apply really thin coats such that the broguing never becomes clogged.

Actually now that I think about it, short of bulling, the best way to apply polish or cream to any shoe...brogued or not...is with fingers.

DW, you are actually right. The main reasons one would refuse to apply polish by fingers nowadays would be fear of solvents, allergic, fear of getting blacking on their fingers, and simply too lazy to wash their hands afterwards. I apply most products with my hands, but I would not apply polish with my fingers. Since I am not allergic, I may give that a try.

 

Speaking of which, how do we maintain whatever is underneath the brogue holes, then?

post #14727 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdavro23 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Stemo, interesting fact that may probably save Pat:

 

_Kiwi polish used to be made out of vinegar, blacking (soot), wax, and sugar.

_Way before Kiwi polish existed, cooking grease, of pure beef tallow or mutton suet, was also used sparingly on footwear to preserve the leather.

_There are also phenomenon of using olive oil on boots as well. I used to try, but it was unimpressive. 

_Many German shoe care products actually used vinegar and ammonia, namely, Tapir leather care. 

 

Two cents that are worth sharing. Enjoy!

 



When I was playing soccer in college, people were still largely wearing leather shoes. As most of the team was foreign, I was exposed to a lot of leather products from all over the world. Our Yugoslavian number 10, Nicola, had a black cream of some sort that he put on his boots that smelled like a combination of rotting corpse, burning tire and getting punched in the face.

While this was 15 years ago, reading your post reminded me of it and I could literally smell it sitting at my desk at work...

I hope you don't take it offensively, because it sounds so funny, but can get to people's irritations, but this is so stereotypical European shoe care products LOL!!! Apart from Saphir, I have known of so many European shoe care products who use very weird solvents in their ingredients, some of which are absurd to think about. 

post #14728 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

A product that I have been liking for stripping is Leather Doctor's degreaser. It is naphtha based, but it has some additives that makes the emulsion a pH of 2.2. This is good because has you're stripping it keeps the pH in check and protonates the leather.

I wouldn't classify Renomat as a type of soap. It is largely acetone. It will get soap-like if agitated enough, but it's a solvent, no two ways about it.

I've never cleaned brougeing holes and would even go as far to say that if you have to you're probably using too much of whatever is clogging them.

Yeah, I was using too much Kiwi wax (as this was before I discovered styleforums). I've been able to get most of the brogue holes relatively clean with a toothpick + paper clip, but there are a few really troublesome holes (the brogue holes right next to the foot hole). I guess I'll have to find some Renomat and give it a try, if that doesn't work I guess there isn't much I can do about it mad.gif
post #14729 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I don't really know the difference between solvents in terms of leather, but I can't imagine any of them are particularly "good" for it. Anything that is better is probably less effective at either cutting grease, or distributing wax honestly. The degreaser is kind of like a gel. Doesn't strip as well as Renomat, or even pure orange oil or turpentine. All of those pure solvents don't have a pH, but degreaser is an emulsion that does, which is what makes me lean towards it. I am sure the other solvents have some sort of acidic/basic characteristic, but it's not on the same scale as pH because they are non-ionic. Of the pure ones I would lean towards orange oil for the fact alone that it inherently has a more acidic characteristic.

Patrick i suspect that degreaser ll take off also the phat and oils of the leather too!! i think that the thing we have all to agree is that every time after a cleaning session we have to condition shoes!

post #14730 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

Patrick i suspect that degreaser ll take off also the phat and oils of the leather too!! i think that the thing we have all to agree is that every time after a cleaning session we have to condition shoes!

Very true, after doing any such stripping you should replace some of the lost oils.
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