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Shirting Fabric- Is Acorn still the best bet? - Page 2

post #16 of 48
fabric width
almost all shirting fabric is 59/60" wide
better yields.
do to the automated nature of many mtm factories, they don't want to cut narrow fabrics anymore. especially 36" fabric.
post #17 of 48
but is the 36" fabric in any way superior to the wider ones? smoother, better texture, anything?
post #18 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post
My real issue these days, is that they are selling fabric to the general public at about the same rate as they are to the trade.

Why this is an issue?

What's wrong with selling to the general public at same rates?

Andrey
post #19 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by andreyb2 View Post
Why this is an issue?

What's wrong with selling to the general public at same rates?

I expect for the same reasons that many companies, not just fabric mills, either don't sell to the general public or they charge more. Primarily because the general public tends to buy much smaller quantities, meaning the per meter overheads are greater and it's rarely worth the effort.
post #20 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum View Post
I expect for the same reasons that many companies, not just fabric mills, either don't sell to the general public or they charge more. Primarily because the general public tends to buy much smaller quantities, meaning the per meter overheads are greater and it's rarely worth the effort.

This argument makes sence. However, if Acorn finds it profitable to deal with the general public charging these prices, then... what is the matter? Why is this bad?

Andrey
post #21 of 48
True that Acorn sells directly to the public but the prices they charge is slightly different from Trade (as evident by the discount given for larger quantities).

Shirtmaven's argument is that when mills try to sell to the public small quantities at the same price as to tailors/ trade, it becomes unfair. Imagine a few things at work, besides getting no discount when you buy in bulk, you still have to plan for storage of those items and the risk that comes along with it such as fire or theft, exchange rate risks and generally the cost of providing a physical sample for the customers to drape or feel.

Certainly as you say, from a consumer's point of view, there is nothing wrong if a company finds it profitable to sell small quantities to the public. It's just that managing its pricing policy and having additional staff deal with cutting and shipping small quantities numerous times over to different addresses worldwide now becomes a management's challenge and some companies find all they need is a B2B policy.
post #22 of 48
Upnorth, thanks for the clarification. Now I fully understand the logic behind Shirtmaven's words. However, this is a logic of a cloth retailer / dealer (one of the things Shirtmaven does for living), not of a shirtmaker. A shirtmaker doesn't order cloth in bulk... only individual cuts -- exactly like individual customers. Andrey
post #23 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by andreyb2 View Post
Upnorth, thanks for the clarification. Now I fully understand the logic behind Shirtmaven's words.

However, this is a logic of a cloth retailer / dealer (one of the things Shirtmaven does for living), not of a shirtmaker. A shirtmaker doesn't order cloth in bulk... only individual cuts -- exactly like individual customers.

Andrey

Confused here.

A shirtmaker is just a maker of shirts and does not carry bolts of shirt fabric? or do they just carry pre-cut (e.g. 2 meters) of different fabrics?
post #24 of 48
Different shirtmakers have different policies. Some have a pre-existing relationship with a cloth merchant to supply JIT fabrics but any shirtmaker worth their salt would stock a wide range of fabrics in fairly large quantities.

Even if they are not a large scale operation, most have at least enough of the same fabrics for 5 shirts, if not much more. I very much doubt that they only stock individual cuts unless they are semi-professional/ stay at home shirtmakers.
post #25 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cordwinder View Post
Confused here.

A shirtmaker is just a maker of shirts and does not carry bolts of shirt fabric? or do they just carry pre-cut (e.g. 2 meters) of different fabrics?

To directly answer your question: they carry books of samples.

Andrey
post #26 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnorth View Post
Different shirtmakers have different policies. Some have a pre-existing relationship with a cloth merchant to supply JIT fabrics but any shirtmaker worth their salt would stock a wide range of fabrics in fairly large quantities.

I guess you haven't visited English shirtmakers.

Either way, even if a shirtmaker stocks some full-length bolts, bulk of the business is done via books.

There are some exceptions (Charvet, Kabbaz) and I believe that MTM makers buy in large quantities. But still.

Andrey
post #27 of 48
Tailors and shirt makers carry sample books to which customers are supposed to pick out their choice and have a shirt made for them? Who is carrying actual stock of the fabric itself? mills? wholesalers? I never been to a English shirtmaker or a tailor (just the ones in Asia) but judging from what I see, they have both their own stock of fabrics and sample books. I always thought the sample books were fabrics they have in stock in a warehouse and not in their shop.
post #28 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cordwinder View Post
I never been to a English shirtmaker or a tailor (just the ones in Asia) but judging from what I see, they have both their own stock of fabrics and sample books. I always thought the sample books were fabrics they have in stock in a warehouse and not in their shop.
No!... *Every* London shirtmaker has Acorn books. I believe they order directly from Acorn. "Bourbaki" (Russian bespoke atelier) has Monti books. I believe they order directly from Monti. Etc, etc. A typical set of books has hundrends, if not thousands of samples. It is impossible for small shirtmakers to keep full bolts of all featured shirtings in their workshops. Andrey
post #29 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by andreyb2 View Post
However, this is a logic of a cloth retailer / dealer (one of the things Shirtmaven does for living), not of a shirtmaker

But Shirtmaven is a shirtmaker...
post #30 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by andreyb2 View Post
No!...

*Every* London shirtmaker has Acorn books. I believe they order directly from Acorn.

"Bourbaki" (Russian bespoke atelier) has Monti books. I believe they order directly from Monti.

Etc, etc.

A typical set of books has hundrends, if not thousands of samples. It is impossible for small shirtmakers to keep full bolts of all featured shirtings in their workshops.

Andrey

No, they do not order directly from Monti. They order from the local Moscow dealer - Irteks*.
Otherwise, they could have probably accelerated delivery of fabrics. I have ordered three S.I.C. Tess fabrics probably 5-6 weeks ago, and those still have not been delivered.

*Irteks also does not have big stocks of fabrics in Moscow. It combines several orders into one and requests delivery from Italy directly from the factory Monti or S.I.C. factory.
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