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Best Chocolates in the World?? - Page 5

post #61 of 93
Ok, I want to try some of this stuff. Do you know any online shops in EU that deliver to EU countries? Thanks
post #62 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by M.D. View Post
... However, when I think about it, the only chocolate for which I specifically make a detour everytime I'm visiting the seaside is The Chocolate Line in Bruges (http://www.thechocolateline.be/) This is one of the three chocolate shops mentionned in the Michelin guide.

My kids still mention that place now almost 10 years later. Absolutely the best. Leonidas are good too btw.
post #63 of 93
post #64 of 93
Nobody mentioned Amedei.
From what I've heard they make some of the finest dark chocolate in the world.
post #65 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
That's true, but I think that the conversation extends to anything available to the public.

To elaborate on this, I nearly always disagree with the purist point of view, which is pretty popular here on any number of clothing related subjects. For example, it could be argued that, say, Freeman's Sporting Club, or Paul Stuart, or Domenico Vacca, just to take as disparate retailer/designers as are represented on the forum, don't actually make anything. They contract out with well known manufacturers in various categories, but they do offer a coherent vision.
post #66 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
To elaborate on this, I nearly always disagree with the purist point of view, which is pretty popular here on any number of clothing related subjects. For example, it could be argued that, say, Freeman's Sporting Club, or Paul Stuart, or Domenico Vacca, just to take as disparate retailer/designers as are represented on the forum, don't actually make anything. They contract out with well known manufacturers in various categories, but they do offer a coherent vision.

I think that kiya's point was that they don't make their own chocolate but buy it as raw material and add to nuts, spices, etc... to make bonbons, pralines, etc... what we generally call "chocolates" (plural). Clearly, Marcolini and Vosges manufacture their product, they don't just design and market.

Not that I disagree with your point - which is valid - but I think he was more focused on the chocolate (singular) making process in his comment.
post #67 of 93
Milka

I'd rather have Nutella than any of this fancy-pants chocolate any day.
post #68 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
I think that kiya's point was that they don't make their own chocolate but buy it as raw material and add to nuts, spices, etc... to make bonbons, pralines, etc... what we generally call "chocolates" (plural). Clearly, Marcolini and Vosges manufacture their product, they don't just design and market.

Not that I disagree with your point - which is valid - but I think he was more focused on the chocolate (singular) making process in his comment.

Yes, that's exactly what i meant.. and for the record Vosges and Marcolini don't make any chocolate either. They simply buy chocolate in bulk and mix in nuts, salts, or spices then package it.
post #69 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiya View Post
Yes, that's exactly what i meant.. and for the record Vosges and Marcolini don't make any chocolate either. They simply buy chocolate in bulk and mix in nuts, salts, or spices then package it.

Do you know of any chocolate-making-companies they use?
post #70 of 93
They probably buy Callebaut or Valrhona or some other high-end bulk chocolate maker
post #71 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiya View Post
Yes, that's exactly what i meant.. and for the record Vosges and Marcolini don't make any chocolate either. They simply buy chocolate in bulk and mix in nuts, salts, or spices then package it.

I know - what I meant is that they manufacture the bonbons and pralines (even if they don't make the chocolate base), unlike the examples of Paul Stuart or Domenico Vacca who are in the business of designing, sourcing, marketing and retailing products that they don't make or transform.
post #72 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
there is a place around the corner from my house that is a 30 year old artisan shop - the origional owner spent a few years in Belgium studying chocolate making and they turn out some very good stuff. I agree that the really good stuff usually comes out of places like that - a small shop of a handful of fanatics.
I love that place, too. I really like the Vosges Black Pearl Bar, but my go to chocolate is Michel Cluizel bars. I stopped into the boutique on 5th Ave recently and had some delicious pralines etc. Maison du Chocolat is also very reliable. For cooking, I always go with Callebaut or Valhrona. I am looking forward to Payard restarting his business. I find his chocolates restrained but intense, and the macarons were just outstanding. What's the collective wisdom on Teuscher? They arrive here in Phila every 10-14 days. I time my visits to the shop accordingly.
post #73 of 93
Mass market I prefer Valrhona. Artisinal I go to a place in Bologna, via Clavatura, Roccati
post #74 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
I know - what I meant is that they manufacture the bonbons and pralines (even if they don't make the chocolate base), unlike the examples of Paul Stuart or Domenico Vacca who are in the business of designing, sourcing, marketing and retailing products that they don't make or transform.

So, more like Wings+Horns, who buy Dayton boots, and then hand-age them in-house? Yeah, I can see that this would be a more appropriate analogy. My point is that the finished product is ultimately what we ought to consider.
post #75 of 93
Did you guys cover Michel Chaudun? Only Paris and Tokyo though.
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