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Your favorite RTW Shirts Makers - Page 2

post #16 of 35
Quote:
http://66.170.193.77/cgi-bin....atuozzo Reading prior threads, the Matuozzo shirts sound seriously expensive ($800? $1000?) as well as difficult, if not impossible, to find in America. At those prices why not go bespoke? I mean, if you've got enough cash to buy a $1k RTW shirt, why not up the ante and get Mr. Kabbaz to make you a cashmere bourbon drinking shirt for two grand? (I hope I'm remembering the price/description accurately--apologies if I'm not.)
The prices you give are for her bespoke offerings... her RTW prices are much much cheaper.
post #17 of 35
My favorite: Charvet. I've found that Charvet RTW fits me well and also wears well. I also like the fabrics and, since I prefer french cuffs, the style as well. T&A is a close second. I prefer the T&A collar style, but find that T&A RTW doesn't fit quite as well.
post #18 of 35
For me, it's Borrelli (for the fit/hand-work, espcially how comfortable the collars are...) and Charvet (simple, elegant shirts that hold up well over time). Someone also mentioned Barba, which I also have come to like in the past year or so.
post #19 of 35
Among English shirtmakers, I'm partial to Coles and T&A (although they have serious issues with the customer service) and I also enjoy Borrelli, Barba, Carlo Franco, and other shirts. I have a pretty broad assortments of dress shirts from various makers.
post #20 of 35
I'm a Borrelli guy--definitely at the top of my price comfort level at full retail for a RTW shirt, but an excellent shirt in styling, fabric, and construction. I agree about Barba. Maybe one of you should become a Barba rep and get them some distribution in the US (as well as some discounts for StyleForum and AA members, of course.). Truzzi also makes a nice shirt, but again, have only gotten them through Ian Daniels.
post #21 of 35
I think Flusser was probably biased in his opinion re: whether men wear clothes too baggy or too tight. Most likely, most bespoke clients are of a larger girth (I believe most people go bespoke because they have serious fit issues with RTW; those who do it because they love the control, etc. are probably in the minority). To this extent, I'm sure most of these fat men do wear jackets too tight, simply because it would be tough to find a jacket properly fitting in the shoulders but loose enough around the midsection. In addition, Flusser probably saw many men who were wearing 5 year old suits, which fit at age 30 but didn't at age 35 (thanks, McDonalds.). Personally, I find that most men of average size wear their jackets too baggy (particularly in the waist) and too wide (in the shoulders). Good tailoring could cure the waist, but the shoulder problem seems intractable (either they are simply wearing the wrong size, or their shoulders are underdeveloped). As for shirts, they are uniformly too baggy. Pants run the gamut from too tight to too loose.
post #22 of 35
I am an advocate of H&K. I don't know how the quality is these days, since the price is down so much, but I really like the collar and the fit of the shirt. Price-wise they are under $100 retail. That is a world of a difference in price from Borrelli. I just ordered my first Borrelli, so I will see how it is. But, H&K is really a nice shirt. Now if only they made non-iron I would be really happy.
post #23 of 35
T&A fabric style quality stripe matching on split yoke the buttons
post #24 of 35
Quote:
T&A stripe matching on split yoke
But not on the shoulders, as I've been informed (even on MTM) koji
post #25 of 35
Naive question, but: who the hell needs a $2400 cashmere bourbon drinking shirt? I would be ashamed to own such a thing.
post #26 of 35
If I may interject with a mordant comment from the peanut gallery: Oh, please. Almost anybody who can cut a shirt can match stripes on a split yoke. Matching stripes on the shoulders and sleeve gauntlets are two of the acid tests of a meticulous shirtmaker.
post #27 of 35
Quote:
Oh, please.  Almost anybody who can cut a shirt can match stripes on a split yoke.  Matching stripes on the shoulders and sleeve gauntlets are two of the acid tests of a meticulous shirtmaker.
Amen, brother. A split yoke without matched stripes would be unsaleable -- it really sticks out.
post #28 of 35
Costume National for casual shirts. Great fit. Slim, but with wider shoulders than HL or Jil Sander, and a little more waist suppression. And the deliberately short short hem is great for wearing with jeans (just bought a pair of Da'amge Ice two days ago (Half price on fairly standard cuts/ washes is hard to resist. Am officially banned from any more jeans purchases) Also like HL, Jil Sander (best workmanship by far) and Prada (their basic shirt designers are terrific, whatever may be said about the workmanship, etc...) Barba and Attolini for dressier shirts. Prefer Barba because of slimmer cuts, more contemporary designs, and (much) better value for the money. I have it on good authority that the person that used to rep Barba in the states dropped the line, and that therefore there is no more Barba available stateside, except perhaps at outlets like FB, and then only occasionally. Runners up include Charvet. Kiton, and Borrelli, in that order.
post #29 of 35
Quote:
Costume National for casual shirts.  Great fit.  Slim, but with wider shoulders than HL or Jil Sander, and a little more waist suppression.  And the deliberately short short hem is great for wearing with jeans (just bought a pair of Da'amge Ice two days ago (Half price on fairly standard cuts/ washes is hard to resist.  Am officially banned from any more jeans purchases) Also like HL, Jil Sander (best workmanship by far) and Prada (their basic shirt designers are terrific, whatever may be said about the workmanship, etc...)   Barba and Attolini for dressier shirts.  Prefer Barba because of slimmer cuts, more contemporary designs, and (much) better value for the money.  I have it on good authority that the person that used to rep Barba in the states dropped the line, and that therefore there is no more Barba available stateside, except perhaps at outlets like FB, and then only occasionally.  Runners up include Charvet. Kiton, and Borrelli, in that order.
Agree with LA Guy. I love Barba shirts, the cut is great, the collars lie well, and they use nice fabrics. koji
post #30 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
T&A fabric style quality stripe matching on split yoke the buttons
The shirts I have don't match stripes
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