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#buttons vs. # of vents?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
i'm getting a new suit (yay.), somewhere between off-the-rack and made-to-measure. i was either going to go 2-button 2 vent or 3-button no vent. i am tall (6'4") and lanky. the saleperson suggested 3-button 2vent. but for some reason this combination doesn't seem to "go" in my brain. maybe i've never heard of it, or ever noticed it it, and so i'm not sure yet if i like the look or not. so, in short, if anyone has something to add here, feel free to say something about the sartorial implications. thanks in advance.
post #2 of 16
Usually with this combination, the lapel will be "rolled" to the second button, so the suit will appear to have two buttons instead of three. When wearing it, you only button the middle button. On higher end suits, this model is the norm rather than the exception.
post #3 of 16
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post #4 of 16
I have six suits from various makers with a 3-button, side vent combo. Some roll to the middle button and others roll to the top. Until recently it was not a widely available style of suit in the mass market (i.e. department store) suits, but very common in higher end and custom tailored suits. However, in the past couple of years it has started to trickle back into the mainstream--H Hilfiger and Banana Republic offer this style of coat.
post #5 of 16
I personally think 2-button looks better than 2.5 or 3-button. Just my 2c.
post #6 of 16
Personally, I can't stand ventless suits.  I have one left in my wardrobe (three button) which I wear out of necessity, but have vowed not to get anymore.  I dislike how it bunches up in the back when one puts his hands in his pockets.  These days, I prefer side vents, though a center vent will suffice.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
i'm getting a new suit (yay.), somewhere between off-the-rack and made-to-measure. i was either going to go 2-button 2 vent or 3-button no vent. i am tall (6'4") and lanky. the saleperson suggested 3-button 2vent. but for some reason this combination doesn't seem to "go" in my brain. maybe i've never heard of it, or ever noticed it  it, and so i'm not sure yet if i like the look or not. so, in short, if anyone has something to add here, feel free to say something about the sartorial implications. thanks in advance.
Bravo, my good man. I think the 3 button with side vents will suit nicely. It's a good combination, and I have it on one of my bespoke suits. In agreement with replies above. I wouldn't get a 3 button that rolled to the top button, however.
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
[didn't want to add another topic on this, since in some way the subject is really "me & new suit". hopefully some of the experts will see this topic rise to the top of the "current" list and reply] OK, now what about coat LENGTH? sleeve length i understand, i'm asking about the coat's skirt. I've heard many "formulas", from flusser to others. i've normally preferred my coats to the longish side, but now that i'm getting one that fits in a very different style (closer, cleaner), i'm reconsidering. and, i also see that it is fashionable for them to be shorter in the recent few years. i don't want to be that fashionable, but don't want to ignore modernity either. so, anything more scientific than "long enough to cover your backside"? again, i'm tall and skinny, so maybe there are some nonlinearities in this rule. i look forward to your illumination.
post #9 of 16
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post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
well, *of course* my coat will cover my butt. all i can say is "yoiks." if otherwise. but (ha.) it's hard to tell just how much when you're the one trying it on. so any rule that does not rely on seing how much of one's butt the jacket covers is helpful. i think flusser says the coat should come to one's fingertips when the hands are naturally cupped and arms at one's sides. but does that mean "loosly open"? or with the fingers closed at the second joint? again, thanks for the pointers, all helpful.
post #11 of 16
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post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
[some of post snipped] Or just reach around with your hands and feel for yourself.
ha. well advised. 8)
post #13 of 16
Quote:
But it depends on what look you are going for.  If you sought out a lean silhouette because you want to look as tall and thin as possible, then you just might want a shorter coat.
I suppose in a work environment you'd want to blend in rather than stand out, but otherwise, I quite prefer lean silhouettes and would try to emphasise it rather than hide it. thin is elegant to me, and besides, not everyone has that body type, so you can work with it to make yourself look distinctive.
post #14 of 16
Your mileage may vary, of course, but the end of my thumb is about where I'm comfortable having my jacket end. Some tailors will do another 1/2 inch or so with success, but that's a useful benchmark.
post #15 of 16
Manton is exactly right about the leg to trunk ratio being the most important thing. I would add that, in getting this balance right, you need to think about whether your height is in your torso or your legs. Most of us tall people have our height in our legs -- if this is the case with you, then Manton's advice as to the jacket length is spot on. If you have normal length legs but a longer torso, then you might have to adjust the measurements slightly for everything to look in balance. Trilby
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