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Fighters? - Page 7

post #91 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
My son likes sword fighting, as best as he can understand it after watching Seven Samurai; so, kendo might be the way to go, though it involves more equipment, or fencing. But all that should probably wait.

cool
post #92 of 123
It's funny... all this talk of martial arts. 99.9% of people who do martial arts never have any real fight experience outside of benign school yard scuffles. The best fighters I know are Irish dudes who get drunk every weekend and fight at 4am with someone lips off to them. Those fights usually last about 7 seconds, ending with the Irish dude bloodying the guy's face in one or two punches.

At the end of the day, a lot of training won't do anything if you don't have the guts and mental wherewithall to pull it off in a real situation. I know a kid from Korea who is some type of god of Tae Kwon Do, and he said he's been in a few real situations, and he didn't react with as much efficiency as he thinks he could have. According to him, a street fight changes everything.
post #93 of 123
actually i like it best as exercise. i get bored with other sorts of exercise and dont feel like i am acheiving anything, fighting arts get me conditioned, and i feel like i am learning, they get my head focussed and give me a great outlet for stress. nothing else i have ever done exercisewise acheives that. sure, i could get better pecs faster if i devoted 2 hours a day to incline flies, but the reality of me is that i would get bored after the third day, feel like it was a waste of time an never go back. i also find that people who are well trained feel the need to prove less and tend to not get into fights. tend to laugh and walk away a lot easier than drunken meatheads.
post #94 of 123
1. Never get in a real fight with someone who you gives you any other option.

2. If you have to fight, don't fight to "win" or you will probably get your ass kicked, fight to maim or kill your opponent. I have had to punch exactly one person in my adult life, and I made damn sure I only had to punch him once.

3. Use the tools at your disposal. If you have a knife/gun/club/mace/stun gun/chair/chopstick/broken bottle/etc, use it. It might save your life (assuming you know how to use it) There are no "rules" to fighting. And if its a life or death matter (which it should be at this point) LIVE.
post #95 of 123
Thread Starter 
Quote:
At the end of the day, a lot of training won't do anything if you don't have the guts and mental wherewithall to pull it off in a real situation. I know a kid from Korea who is some type of god of Tae Kwon Do, and he said he's been in a few real situations, and he didn't react with as much efficiency as he thinks he could have. According to him, a street fight changes everything.
Not everyone learns martial arts to be able to use it in a street fight. I sure as hell don't. It's just the most fun sport I've ever participated in. There are certain elements that will give you an advantage on the street, but not many, and especially not from TKD. It's the most frustrating thing when I tell people my hobbies, and martial arts is the only one that anyone ever says, "Yea but that shit doesn't matter on the street!"
post #96 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
Not everyone learns martial arts to be able to use it in a street fight. I sure as hell don't. It's just the most fun sport I've ever participated in. There are certain elements that will give you an advantage on the street, but not many, and especially not from TKD. It's the most frustrating thing when I tell people my hobbies, and martial arts is the only one that anyone ever says, "Yea but that shit doesn't matter on the street!"
allow me to be the first to deviate from that Brian....

"youre fancyass selvedge denim dont mean shit on the streets"
post #97 of 123
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
Good, practical style. I've never understood why it has two spellings though: Kenpo and Kempo. The school I went to spelled it Kenpo.

Because in Japanese, when you have an "n" before a bilabial consanent, it is pronounced "m" like "tenpura" sounds like "tempura." Since the Japanese language doesn't use roman characters, there is really no saying whether or not it's officially an "n" or an "m" as the sound of that particular symbol depends on if it is attached to a bilabial sound (np, nb) another vowel (na, nu, no, ni, ne), or at the end of a word (pan [bread], which sounds like "pang," or yarujan, which sounds like "yarujang"). However, the symbol is most commonly referred to as the "n" symbol, so, from a most technical standpoint and not from a directly phonetic standpoint, Kenpo is more correct, as is Tenpura, etc.

I think Chinese Kenpo is beautiful. Southern style Chinese martial arts, in general, are way underrated as being effective, beautiful and powerful. I learned a Longfist form, and then a Southern Fist form... I much preferred the wild and more powerful style of southern.

Japanese Kenpo, I think is practical mostly because it doesn't have such a traditional basis as Shotokan Karate, so it involves a lot of practical streetfighting techniques.

IMO, one should learn Chinese martial arts before anything. They require the most flexibility, endurance and the training is the most intense - at least in my experience (yes, more intense than Muay Thai, just less getting hit). Also, it's good for kids because they can extend their flexibility at an early age and there is generally no fighting involved so there's no risk of injury.
post #98 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by m@T
allow me to be the first to deviate from that Brian....

"youre fancyass selvedge denim dont mean shit on the streets"
Quick dude, totally beat me to it
post #99 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
1. Never get in a real fight with someone who you gives you any other option.

2. If you have to fight, don't fight to "win" or you will probably get your ass kicked, fight to maim or kill your opponent. I have had to punch exactly one person in my adult life, and I made damn sure I only had to punch him once.

3. Use the tools at your disposal. If you have a knife/gun/club/mace/stun gun/chair/chopstick/broken bottle/etc, use it. It might save your life (assuming you know how to use it) There are no "rules" to fighting. And if its a life or death matter (which it should be at this point) LIVE.

Slim - this is probrably the first and only time that you will be told this - you sound like my Dad. his advice

1. never get into a fight if you can avoid it

2. never get into a fight with somebody whose job was to work with their hands (he was talking bricklayer, not hairdresser)

3. always have something to use as a weapon. if you throw somebody into a tree, that counts as a weapon.


seriously, I have come back to martial arts because I enjoy the exersize, and I really enjoy the physical contact and the short adrenalin of sparing.

the only times I have had to use violence, since I got out of high school, I have been paid for it, or I was threatened with a mugging or I was helping somebody out who was in trouble. but again, this comes to the confidence thing - I am 5 foot 5. I think that I look about as threatening as a stuffed koala toy. But I do have a very strong (and realistic) sense of confidence in my abilty to control physical encounters, and that has been a factor in my avoiding them.
post #100 of 123
In the correct hands, a piece of paper can be used to cut an Irish brickworker's throat. Unfortunately, Chuck Norris' hands are busy pumping lead from twin Mac 10s into a turbine. Thus the world has energy.
post #101 of 123
Quote:
Slim - this is probrably the first and only time that you will be told this - you sound like my Dad.

Haha, well son. You found me out.

<------ works with his hands.
post #102 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
...my Dad. his advice

1. never get into a fight if you can avoid it

2. never get into a fight with somebody whose job was to work with their hands (he was talking bricklayer, not hairdresser)

3. always have something to use as a weapon. if you throw somebody into a tree, that counts as a weapon.


Great advice. Number 2 is absolutely correct. Unless you are a pro boxer or MMA fighter, there is no conditioning like construction work. We desk jockeys can train for a few hours day, but it's no substitute for hauling around heavy things all day long, especially out doors. In my adult life, I've gotten into several street and bar fights because I have a condition that is, um, sometimes misunderstood. Mostly, I've come out at least even because I am naturally aggressive. I would say that some of my training came in useful, but the conditioning is much more so. But I trained because I thought that martial arts were really interesting, good exercise, and made me at least a little better able to handle myself than the average desk jockey (huge acomplishment. Incidentally, a good friend of mine, the black guy in my original "Pictures of yourself" thread posting, who is about 40 pounds heavier (about 195 lbs), 3 inches taller (6'2"), has much less training than I do, but has a natural grip stronger than anyone I have met, could make bread pudding out of my face in about 10 seconds flat (he is really fast with his hands too). He always avoided trouble, to the point that he would make it a point to leave a club at least an hour before closing time, when dudes would start throwing gang signs and getting drunk and frustrated.

BTW, Brian and Zach, the low defensive stance I refered to earlier is a classic Southern Fist stance. I'll google a classical picture of it when I get chance. Basically, it's a low, wide horse stance with the leading arm in a sort of bicep flexed position, and the back arm horizontal across the body, with the fist horizontal, protecting your front.
post #103 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
Haha, well son. You found me out.

<------ works with his hands.


dude, you promised to pay my college tuition!!
post #104 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
BTW, Brian and Zach, the low defensive stance I refered to earlier is a classic Southern Fist stance. I'll google a classical picture of it when I get chance. Basically, it's a low, wide horse stance with the leading arm in a sort of bicep flexed position, and the back arm horizontal across the body, with the fist horizontal, protecting your front.

I have seen it, I know what you mean - I just wish I could do it. I have a great fighting stance - I call it "short fat old man trying to talk you out of beating him up"
post #105 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
2. ... I have had to punch exactly one person in my adult life, and I made damn sure I only had to punch him once.

Was s/he at the Apple store?
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