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Random fashion thoughts - Page 5633

post #84481 of 102412
Quote:
Originally Posted by worakl View Post




Has this gone through RFT yet? It's quite... something... Lot's of fashion-commentary in there. Y'all ever seen Wreck it Ralph?!?!
post #84482 of 102412
while we're posting vids
post #84483 of 102412
is it worth it let me work it
post #84484 of 102412
That hashtag video is classic.
post #84485 of 102412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Biggskip View Post


Finn is pretty much right about the margins, but since they're spending so much to evolve into new markets, it's tough to say what their true margins would be like (see Item 6)

http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1018724/000119312513028520/d445434d10k.htm#tx445434_10

That said, that's all the more reason why Superego is correct in that nobody will be able to take over for Amazon. The scale of their operations combined with their excellent customer service, product offerings, and order turnaround time would be pretty much an insurmountable barrier to entry for all with the exception of Walmart.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

With the complaints being made here and everywhere else, I don't see why someone shouldn't be able to slowly but surely move in on both.

Re. Ebay and Paypal - Giants like China's Alibaba do pose a threat, but if that happens, it's "Hail to the new king". The scale is what allows them to do whatever the fuck it is they want. Look at our marketplace - we have a really large audience dedicated to one thing, and it's still harder to sell stuff here, with exceptions (like niche CM stuff), than on Ebay, because *everyone* is looking there. And nobody, fanatics aside, is going to eschew a platform, both as a seller and a buyer, because they just don't like their policies. If they have the goods, the consumer will go. If they have the (huge) audience, the buyers will go.

Amazon has huge market penetration, better prices, better customer service (including things like shipping options), and better selection, than anything else out there. There are essentially no complaints about it, anywhere. If I want something, and fast, like really good mooncakes from HongKong, I go to Amazon, use my Amazon Prime account, and Hong Kong sourced mooncakes at my door in 2 days, for $2.75 or some ridiculously low shipping. I need a fast gift or pair of running shoes? My VIP Zappos (Amazon owned) gets me stuff overnighted. I generally don't even look anywhere else.

In e-commerce, there is a lot of space along the margins, in the niches that are hard for Amazon, just because it's hard for a huge company to deal with really small clients. The problem is that these are not competitors in any meaningful way. They are rats going after the scraps.

Are there alternatives to Amazon? I could see that happening. For example, if a platform like BigCommerce or Shopify decided to start doing all the hosting, handle payments in exchange for a fee, you could start to see some scale. There is probably a model out there that will challenge Amazon, but that remains hidden in the future.
post #84486 of 102412
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post



Re. Ebay and Paypal - Giants like China's Alibaba do pose a threat, but if that happens, it's "Hail to the new king". The scale is what allows them to do whatever the fuck it is they want. Look at our marketplace - we have a really large audience dedicated to one thing, and it's still harder to sell stuff here, with exceptions (like niche CM stuff), than on Ebay, because *everyone* is looking there. And nobody, fanatics aside, is going to eschew a platform, both as a seller and a buyer, because they just don't like their policies. If they have the goods, the consumer will go. If they have the (huge) audience, the buyers will go.

Amazon has huge market penetration, better prices, better customer service (including things like shipping options), and better selection, than anything else out there. There are essentially no complaints about it, anywhere. If I want something, and fast, like really good mooncakes from HongKong, I go to Amazon, use my Amazon Prime account, and Hong Kong sourced mooncakes at my door in 2 days, for $2.75 or some ridiculously low shipping. I need a fast gift or pair of running shoes? My VIP Zappos (Amazon owned) gets me stuff overnighted. I generally don't even look anywhere else.

In e-commerce, there is a lot of space along the margins, in the niches that are hard for Amazon, just because it's hard for a huge company to deal with really small clients. The problem is that these are not competitors in any meaningful way. They are rats going after the scraps.

Are there alternatives to Amazon? I could see that happening. For example, if a platform like BigCommerce or Shopify decided to start doing all the hosting, handle payments in exchange for a fee, you could start to see some scale. There is probably a model out there that will challenge Amazon, but that remains hidden in the future.

 

If Shopify and BigCommerce are smart they're already taking a fee for any transaction going through their system.

 

Amazon is great at what it does but falls apart in certain niches where complex categorisation is needed. I have and continue to work in a pretty boring segment of the ecommerce industry, selling spare parts for white goods, and it's just not something that Amazon is equipped to deal with properly. Not only is the product categorisation extremely complex, but the logistics side of things makes it all the harder, it's not uncommon for warehouses to contains at least half a million different SKU's.

 

The real revolution, I think, will come from whoever manages to integrate a payment gateway that handles online and offline transactions effectively. One that can easily integrate on top of existing ecommerce platforms and provide a simple and effective checkout solution.

post #84487 of 102412
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post


Re. Ebay and Paypal - Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Giants like China's Alibaba do pose a threat, but if that happens, it's "Hail to the new king". The scale is what allows them to do whatever the fuck it is they want. Look at our marketplace - we have a really large audience dedicated to one thing, and it's still harder to sell stuff here, with exceptions (like niche CM stuff), than on Ebay, because *everyone* is looking there. And nobody, fanatics aside, is going to eschew a platform, both as a seller and a buyer, because they just don't like their policies. If they have the goods, the consumer will go. If they have the (huge) audience, the buyers will go.

Amazon has huge market penetration, better prices, better customer service (including things like shipping options), and better selection, than anything else out there. There are essentially no complaints about it, anywhere. If I want something, and fast, like really good mooncakes from HongKong, I go to Amazon, use my Amazon Prime account, and Hong Kong sourced mooncakes at my door in 2 days, for $2.75 or some ridiculously low shipping. I need a fast gift or pair of running shoes? My VIP Zappos (Amazon owned) gets me stuff overnighted. I generally don't even look anywhere else.

In e-commerce, there is a lot of space along the margins, in the niches that are hard for Amazon, just because it's hard for a huge company to deal with really small clients. The problem is that these are not competitors in any meaningful way. They are rats going after the scraps.

Are there alternatives to Amazon? I could see that happening. For example, if a platform like BigCommerce or Shopify decided to start doing all the hosting, handle payments in exchange for a fee, you could start to see some scale. There is probably a model out there that will challenge Amazon, but that remains hidden in the future.

Fok, this time you and I agree completely.
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamacyborg View Post

If Shopify and BigCommerce are smart they're already taking a fee for any transaction going through their system.

Amazon is great at what it does but falls apart in certain niches where complex categorisation is needed. I have and continue to work in a pretty boring segment of the ecommerce industry, selling spare parts for white goods, and it's just not something that Amazon is equipped to deal with properly. Not only is the product categorisation extremely complex, but the logistics side of things makes it all the harder, it's not uncommon for warehouses to contains at least half a million different SKU's.

The real revolution, I think, will come from whoever manages to integrate a payment gateway that handles online and offline transactions effectively. One that can easily integrate on top of existing ecommerce platforms and provide a simple and effective checkout solution.

What are white goods?
post #84488 of 102412
post #84489 of 102412
.
post #84490 of 102412

white goods = appliances, no?

 

also, don't know if it was posted here but H&M will start an e-commerce site for COS next year, with an actual store due to open in the Spring (NYC)

 

http://racked.com/archives/2013/09/26/hms-cos-brand-will-make-its-stateside-in-nyc-this-spring.php

post #84491 of 102412
Quote:
Originally Posted by jet View Post

while we're posting vids

 

post #84492 of 102412
whats going on with siki aw13 stocks? havent seen it anywhere plain.gif
post #84493 of 102412
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamacyborg View Post

If Shopify and BigCommerce are smart they're already taking a fee for any transaction going through their system.
They don't. They charge a fee for the software. There are tons of (legal) liabilities when you start taking fees for transactions. To do what Ebay is doing (not sure what the Amazon fee model for hosted stores is), you need a huge infrastructure in place to police things. It sounds like the obvious way to do things (everyone suggests it), but you get into a morass of rules and regulations.
Quote:
Amazon is great at what it does but falls apart in certain niches where complex categorisation is needed. I have and continue to work in a pretty boring segment of the ecommerce industry, selling spare parts for white goods, and it's just not something that Amazon is equipped to deal with properly. Not only is the product categorisation extremely complex, but the logistics side of things makes it all the harder, it's not uncommon for warehouses to contains at least half a million different SKU's.
You think that it's tough for them to do white goods? It absolutely still sucks at fashion. That said, a giant like that has $$$ and resources to throw into getting things right. And with initiatives like Myhabit and buying companies like Zappos, it's learning fast. The google model of "if you don't know how to do it, acquire someone who does and use their technology and expertise" is not a bad one.
Quote:
The real revolution, I think, will come from whoever manages to integrate a payment gateway that handles online and offline transactions effectively. One that can easily integrate on top of existing ecommerce platforms and provide a simple and effective checkout solution.
I dunno. Why would this be a big revolution? Small stores would use it. It would be a cool niche product. But small stores already have workarounds that work okay, and for the big players, it's much more economical to split your business up into B&M and a pureplay. It would make no sense for Walmart, for example to want to integrate their checkout systems.
post #84494 of 102412
You all made me believe NYC was going to be full of next level fits. Lies.
post #84495 of 102412
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyc wid it View Post

You all made me believe NYC was going to be full of next level fits. Lies.

never been to NYC? pockets of good fits, but mostly what you'd expect from an 8mm+ mass metropolis.
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