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Your Suit Is Making You Stupid

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by odoreater, Sep 8, 2006.

  1. Ambulance Chaser

    Ambulance Chaser Senior member

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    The Virginia Bar Exam requires test takers to wear business dress. Sneakers are allowed, however, which kind of defeats the purpose.
     
  2. odoreater

    odoreater Senior member

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    The Virginia Bar Exam requires test takers to wear business dress. Sneakers are allowed, however, which kind of defeats the purpose.

    I think they allow sneakers because they don't want the "click clack" of leather soled shoes as people walk down the aisle to go to the bathroom or whatever while others are taking exams.

    Yes, but you missed the point.

    What point exactly did I miss?
     
  3. Nantucket Red

    Nantucket Red Senior member

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    I agree that wearing sweat suits to the office would be a terrible idea, but come on, you're telling me that you never wore sweats or shorts to a college class?

    Yes, that's right, never. I did not even own a pair of sweats during college. I did wear wife-beaters, but with khakis and loafers and a button-down shirt to cover up as necessary.

    EDIT: By the way, Nantucket Red, when I made the comment about people who were born in suits and feel more comfortable in their suits than in anything else, I had you in mind. [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Wait . . . I'm that predictable? [​IMG]
     
  4. mrchapel

    mrchapel Senior member

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    <snip>
    What point exactly did I miss?


    It seemed as though you spoke about something I didn't even comment on...in regards to wearing sweatpants in a meeting...
     
  5. odoreater

    odoreater Senior member

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    It seemed as though you spoke about something I didn't even comment on...in regards to wearing sweatpants in a meeting...

    Oh ok, tone is kind of hard to get across on the internet. What I meant by that is that you were right on your original point, but I was disagreeing with a possible inference from the original quote from the article I posted - the inference being that people might work better even in an office environment in sweats. I didn't infer that from your post, but from the original article.
     
  6. mrchapel

    mrchapel Senior member

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    Oh ok, tone is kind of hard to get across on the internet. What I meant by that is that you were right on your original point, but I was disagreeing with a possible inference from the original quote from the article I posted - the inference being that people might work better even in an office environment in sweats. I didn't infer that from your post, but from the original article.

    My apologies; I just inferred that because you quoted my post. No worries.
     
  7. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    I would feel consciously uncomfortable in sweats or pajamas or any variation of that.
     
  8. Strokeman

    Strokeman Active Member

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    The Virginia Bar Exam requires test takers to wear business dress. Sneakers are allowed, however, which kind of defeats the purpose.

    Oxford exams require subfusc: dark suit, black socks and shoes, white shirt and collar, and white bow tie. Mortarboards to be carried and not worn. [​IMG]
     
  9. wheelerray

    wheelerray Senior member

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    I think we missed the real correllation:

    The better dressed subjects were probably getting attention from the opposite sex. Those in sweats were likely ignored by the opposite sex, and probably felt so sloppy they were too ashamed to try to flirt. Subjects not distracted by sexual possibilities would therefore be more focused on the test and score higher. [​IMG]
     
  10. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    All I can say is that they didn't give them Borrelli for the study. I'm guessing most of these people have very low-end suits because I wear dress pants and sports jackets almost every day despite having no need for doing so. I'm never uncomfortable and I write exams in them as well. Having owned a couple low-end suits in the past, I can agree with the findings however. Cheap suits ARE uncomfortable and I can see them cutting productivity. Even stepping up to Armani made my old Moores suit feel like cardboard. There's no way I could have been comfortable sitting in a Moores suit for 3 hours. Borrelli on the other hand... I do everything in them including salsa dancing.
     
  11. coatandthai

    coatandthai Senior member

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    Link please. This sounds bogus and a quick and dirty search reveals nothing. Men's Health isn't exactly Nature or Science. Oh yeah, and there's a study that shows that 45.3% of statstics are simply made up numbers.
     
  12. kitonbrioni

    kitonbrioni Senior member

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    Without reading the study it hard to tell what type of research design was used, but I don't see any valid connection of required dress and test performance.
     
  13. odoreater

    odoreater Senior member

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    Link please. This sounds bogus and a quick and dirty search reveals nothing. Men's Health isn't exactly Nature or Science. Oh yeah, and there's a study that shows that 45.3% of statstics are simply made up numbers.

    Link? I got it out of the magazine. There are still people that read paper magazines out there.

    Here's a citation for you: Men's Health, September 2006, "Clothes Make the Mind," pg. 56.

    I am very insulted that you would imply that I'm making this up. Disagreeing with the blurb is one thing, but implying that I'm making the blurb up is quite another. Shame on you.
     
  14. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Harvard is a bit of a business now, so I suspect they're pandering to mainstream ideas about casual dress, and replicating it in some post-modernist psychological study on college students who are not generally known for their sartorial splendor.
     
  15. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Sweat suits in public unless you are training tell the world -"that's it, I've given up.."
    A lot of fat women with vague facial hair, and people you suspect have suicide hotlines on speed-dial wear sweats out about town.
     
  16. odoreater

    odoreater Senior member

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    Harvard is a bit of a business now, so I suspect they're pandering to mainstream ideas about casual dress, and replicating it in some post-modernist psychological study on college students who are not generally known for their sartorial splendor.

    That's actually the first thing I thought when I read it too.
     
  17. coatandthai

    coatandthai Senior member

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    I'm not saying YOU made it up, I'm doubting the source. I googled the guy's name and the topic and found nothing. You can see a story in USA Today that says &quot;a Harvard study found that . . . &quot; and you read the study and it says no such thing. Testing people for cognitive abilty as correlated (not caused) to clothing seems very questionable for Harvard to study. Contrary to other postings, Harvard does not do things willy nilly, especially where its reputation could be injured. Men's Health, on the other hand, is the equivalent to Mademoiselle and Elle for women -- you know, &quot;10 easy steps to a better love life&quot; and &quot;flat abs for summer in just 1 week.&quot;
     
  18. esquire.

    esquire. Senior member

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    I wouldn't necessairly be surprised by the results of this study although I would focus on the tie itself rather than the suit. Most likely, those students were wearing a shirt and tie with those suits. Vascular constricition caused by tight ties would lead to decreased blood flow to the brain and sensory organs like the eyes ( Human Factors (Vol. 29, pp. 67-71)). If we accept that there's decreased blood flow to the brain from wearing a tie, and we know that the brain needs fresh flow of blood to function, then I don't think its out of line to suggest that wearing something that would decrease that bloodflow would also result in a brain functioning below its capabilities.

    I would have liked to have that study also test students wearing suits but not wearing a tie at the same time.
     
  19. chobochobo

    chobochobo Senior member Moderator

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    Oxford exams require subfusc: dark suit, black socks and shoes, white shirt and collar, and white bow tie. Mortarboards to be carried and not worn. [​IMG]

    Don't forget your scholar's gown and carnation.
     
  20. odoreater

    odoreater Senior member

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    Men's Health, on the other hand, is the equivalent to Mademoiselle and Elle for women -- you know, "10 easy steps to a better love life" and "flat abs for summer in just 1 week."

    Which is exactly why some of you are taking this way too seriously. On the other hand, I don't see why it's so hard to believe that this study could be correct. I mean, why's it so hard to believe that it's easier to perform better cognitively when you are more comfortable? As much as many of the members here say that their Borrelli and Kiton suits feel like a second skin, for most people, sweats are a lot more comfortable than a suit. Even if you're wearing a nice suit, just having a belt strapped around your waist is uncomfortable. Also, no matter how expensive your Edward Greens are, they're not going to be as comfortable as a good pair of sneakers (again, for the vast majority of people in the world). I don't see why you think this is beyond the realm of possibility or probability.
     

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