1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Your Ancestry

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Gav, Jan 4, 2008.

  1. FLMountainMan

    FLMountainMan Senior member

    Messages:
    13,923
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Location:
    McAnally Flats
    For some reason, I've alway been jealous of the unmixed.

    Eh.....most Koreans are a mixture of Japanese and Chinese. If you go back far enough, everyone's mixed.
     
  2. emptym

    emptym Senior member Moderator

    Messages:
    7,321
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2007
    For some reason, I've alway been jealous of the unmixed.

    How come? Personally, I'm happy to be Russian Jewish, Irish, Welsh and Native American on my fr's side, and Filipino (Malay, Spanish, Chinese, Mongolian, and Italian) on my mom's. You're equally at home... and not at home... almost everywhere (the latter of which may get at what you mean).

    Eh.....most Koreans are a mixture of Japanese and Chinese. If you go back far enough, everyone's mixed.

    Interesting. I agree w/ the thought that if you go back far enough, everyone's an immigrant. This is a good, related thought.
     
  3. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

    Messages:
    3,983
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2004
    Location:
    Negrolandia
    How come?

    No real rational reason honestly. Just an automatic emotion.
     
  4. JetBlast

    JetBlast Senior member

    Messages:
    5,880
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles / London
    I'm proud British on my father's side, and Irish on my mother's. Go UK.

    JB
     
  5. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,219
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    I have a uncle who's half Chinaman...

    Why does that term always strike me as a racial epitaph?

    I am genetically northern European mutt. Typical genetic mix of Scandinavian, Celt, Pict, Angle, Saxon, et al blood from the British Isles.
     
  6. Connemara

    Connemara Senior member

    Messages:
    39,486
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Why does that term always strike me as a racial epitaph? I am genetically northern European mutt. Typical genetic mix of Scandinavian, Celt, Pict, Angle, Saxon, et al blood from the British Isles.
    They make racial epitaphs nowadays? [​IMG]
     
  7. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

    Messages:
    3,983
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2004
    Location:
    Negrolandia
    Why does that term always strike me as a racial epitaph?
    It might be, I was more saying it "Jamaican" than in the way we'd say here, mon instead of man. Jamaicans still call Indians and light skinned Blacks coolies, offensive anywhere else, but it is a highly desirable look and quite complimentary there, as they are color struck in the extreme.
     
  8. dtmt

    dtmt Senior member

    Messages:
    2,317
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Half 'n' Half: Finnish + Italian

    But here, almost everyone thinks I'm French. And I don't even own a beret.
     
  9. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,219
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    They make racial epitaphs nowadays?


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Okay, egregious spelling error noted. Racial epithet...ya Mc! [​IMG]
     
  10. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,219
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    It might be, I was more saying it "Jamaican" than in the way we'd say here, mon instead of man. Jamaicans still call Indians and light skinned Blacks coolies, offensive anywhere else, but it is a highly desirable look and quite complimentary there, as they are color struck in the extreme.

    Are you Jamaican? I always thought you were from Philly or Harlem, as you speak of them often. If so, as a US native, you knew how the term would be viewed in the US, so I guess I am confused. If I were to use the N-word as say, rappers use it, would that be okay?
     
  11. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

    Messages:
    3,983
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2004
    Location:
    Negrolandia
    Are you Jamaican? I always thought you were from Philly or Harlem, as you speak of them often. If so, as a US native, you knew how the term would be viewed in the US, so I guess I am confused. If I were to use the N-word as say, rappers use it, would that be okay?
    I'm from Hartford CT, I just wish I was a Harlemnite. As I said earlier my father is Jamaican and I grew up in a Jamaican neighborhood, so I use their terminology frequently. You can say what you like online , I wouldn't advise you to say it to my or many Blacks faces. But, if a Chinese or Indian person told me they took offense to what I said, I'd apologize. Your opinion on it doesn't matter, it is a little phony to be offended for others, especially for such a mild term. It is also silly to compare Chinamon to the N-word, highly different terms.
     
  12. SoCal2NYC

    SoCal2NYC Senior member

    Messages:
    12,204
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Location:
    Manhattan
    I've always thought tracing American "ancestry" back in this day and age a bit contrived.
    Okay, so chances are that someone you never met or who died when you were 2 years old moved to the U.S. in the early 19th century. How does that have an affect on how you live your life now or what you would identify as? It's something that you should be "proud" of or make an associate claim to?
    To me it just seems like a phony excuse for people to make themselves seem more interesting.
     
  13. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

    Messages:
    3,983
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2004
    Location:
    Negrolandia
    I've always thought tracing American "ancestry" back in this day and age a bit contrived.
    Okay, so chances are that someone you never met or who died when you were 2 years old moved to the U.S. in the early 19th century. How does that have an affect on how you live your life now or what you would identify as? It's something that you should be "proud" of or make an associate claim to?
    To me it just seems like a phony excuse for people to make themselves seem more interesting.


    I believe; I am them, they are me.
     
  14. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,219
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    ...You can say what you like online , I wouldn't advise you to say it to my...faces... Your opinion on it doesn't matter, it is a little phony to be offended for others, especially for such a mild term. It is also silly to compare Chinamon to the N-word, highly different terms.

    Really? My opinion doesn't matter on this? I kinda think it does. I am not shy to take issue with the term any time it is used in front of my wife. She happens to be 50% Chinese and she does find it offensive. Your attempts at defending the use of what most find a racially offensive term is getting lamer by the post, such as your new spelling of the term to try and soften the insult. And "highly different term"? Not through lack of history. Go educate yourself just a little bit about the history of the "Chinaman" in the West and Southwest. You know what's phony? Your lame attempt at making this "okay" by use of culture. Not as lame though as the little bit of Internet Tough Guy there for asking a parallel question. That's always a winning gambit on the 'Net, isn't it? No wait, let me guess...you learned karate from a Chinaman, right? [​IMG]
     
  15. A Harris

    A Harris Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    4,582
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    My grandfather on my father's side was 1/2 German, 1/4 English and as much as 1/4 native American. We don't know exactly how much because my great grandfather, born appx 1868/died 1926, was a fairly successful businessman at the time and covered up his lineage quite thoroughly.

    My grandmother on my father's side was German.

    My grandfather from my mother's side was Armenian, his family escaped from Turkey circa 1896.

    My grandmother from my mother's side comes from an old American family that goes back about as far in this country as it can. Descended from various European settlers, and a little native American blood too. Her side of the family claims Mary Todd, Eli Whitney, John Smith and a few other notable early Americans as ancestors.
     
  16. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

    Messages:
    3,983
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2004
    Location:
    Negrolandia
    Really? My opinion doesn't matter on this? I kinda think it does. I am not shy to take issue with the term any time it is used in front of my wife. She happens to be 50% Chinese and she does find it offensive. Your attempts at defending the use of what most find a racially offensive term is getting lamer by the post, such as your new spelling of the term to try and soften the insult. And "highly different term"? Not through lack of history. Go educate yourself just a little bit about the history of the "Chinaman" in the West and Southwest. You know what's phony? Your lame attempt at making this "okay" by use of culture. Not as lame though as the little bit of Internet Tough Guy there for asking a parallel question. That's always a winning gambit on the 'Net, isn't it? No wait, let me guess...you learned karate from a Chinaman, right? [​IMG]

    I guess you are in a fighting mood. Chinamon and N**ger are not equivalents, period. I wouldn't call your wife Chinamon as she isn't male. I'd never purposely offend anyone, so as I said, if an Asian is offended I'll explain and apologize. I do find it funny that you accusing me of racism for referring to my own family member as a Chinamen/mon( it actually his son's nickname).
    As for the Internet tough guy thing. I though my comment was the opposite. I said you can say n**gger online as much as you desire, I wouldn't advise you to say it me or ANY OTHER Black in person. How you derive a threat from that, who knows. But if it will make you feel better and if you are truly offended for your wife, tell her I am sorry it wasn't malicious, there you go you win(I'm an Internet punk now, I suppose)
     
  17. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,219
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    I guess you are in a fighting mood. Chinamon and N**ger are not equivalents, period. I wouldn't call your wife Chinamon as she isn't male. I'd never purposely offend anyone, so as I said, if an Asian is offended I'll explain and apologize. I do find it funny that you accusing me of racism for referring to my own family member as a Chinamen/mon( it actually his son's nickname).
    As for the Internet tough guy thing. I though my comment was the opposite. I said you can say n**gger online as much as you desire, I wouldn't advise you to say it me or ANY OTHER Black in person. How you derive a threat from that, who knows. But if it will make you feel better and if you are truly offended for your wife, tell her I am sorry it wasn't malicious, there you go you win(I'm an Internet punk now, I suppose)


    Maybe if you just don't use it, you won't have to apologize for it? I don't think it was malicious and I really don't think 50% of the racially offensive things people say in general are meant maliciously, they're just things said by people either not thinking or ignorant of what they're saying. I'm not trying to pick a fight, as much as it might seem. It's just that for a guy that is so cognizant of his being black, you sure defended your use of a term many find racially offensive...and kept defending it and then calling me phony!

    Call it a draw until next time?
     
  18. Violinist

    Violinist Senior member

    Messages:
    1,907
    Joined:
    May 12, 2006
    Actually, Chinaman is a colonial word in the same vein as "oriental". It's fairly backward and underscores the peculiar and often derisive lense through which westerners, especially the British, viewed east Asian culture.

    So it may be a jamaican thing, but I don't think saying bati boy would be any less offensive just because you said it in your neighborhood.

    This is at least the 2nd time I've seen you get into an argument over the symantics of racial words, and every time, the reasoning is highly manipulated and biased in your favor.

    As for the original question; if your ancestry is the most interesting thing about you (and there are several people, like j whatever who mention it at just about every single opportunity), then you should probably try a little harder to find something real to define yourself with.
     
  19. Gav

    Gav Active Member

    Messages:
    28
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2007
    Location:
    Scotland
    I've always thought tracing American "ancestry" back in this day and age a bit contrived.
    Okay, so chances are that someone you never met or who died when you were 2 years old moved to the U.S. in the early 19th century. How does that have an affect on how you live your life now or what you would identify as? It's something that you should be "proud" of or make an associate claim to?
    To me it just seems like a phony excuse for people to make themselves seem more interesting.


    I'd say you should be proud of where you come from, your history. Like i said in my OP I was extremely proud of it all, it was a natural emotion to have. Are you not of yours?

    I see what you are getting at with your last sentence there. That really all depends on who is truthful or not. I guess you've just got to put some kind of trust that people won't fabricate lies.
     
  20. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

    Messages:
    9,455
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2006
    Location:
    Not in Atlanta, GA
    The worst are those crummy web sites that will "research" your coat of arms (and they all seem to have the helmet from a suit of armor in them) and trace your geneology all the way back to Adam for $29.95. I entered my mom's name on a lark and you'd think I was descended all the way down from King Arthur himself. I think they make most of that shit up.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by