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Yohji, Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love The Looser Fit (Yohji Yamamoto Thread)

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Ivwri, Dec 29, 2011.

  1. sepp

    sepp Senior member

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    A question to gurus here in this thread.


    What is exactly a hakama pants in Yohji's design? I had always thought it's something like a pant skirt with pleats like:

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    However, as I tried to know more, I found the following are often described as "hakama pants" as well:

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    I am trying to seek a clarification in terms of Yohji's designs only and not in the traditional sense of a Japanese hakama pants.

    Would welcome all views and opinions on this. Have a pleasant weekend.
     
  2. leviticus

    leviticus Member

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    Glad to see he did a rendition of this design in silk. I have a cotton version from SS12 (i believe) and it is a favorite.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Parker

    Parker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I think you could say any pants which have elements from traditional hakamas: pleats, waist straps, etc. There are so many versions though -- some closer to traditional style and others a looser interpretation. the balloon pants and other half skirt wrap type pants could all have hakama elements. disclaimer: this is just my non-guru observation.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. the shah

    the shah Senior member

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    Just thought I'd share some older articles, hopefully no repeats given the great wealth of info already shared here

    YOHJI YAMAMOTO
    WWD (Jul 8, 2002): 7.
    YOHJI YAMAMOTO: Haute enough for you? You bet. The collection Yohji Yamamoto showed on Sunday evening provided a high chic entree to the couture season -- even if it was ready-to-wear.

    But then, the distinction between haute couture and ready-to-wear has blurred for some time -- the once-staunch Chambre Syndicale rules now a quaint memory; designers talking about selling from their boutiques -- and there was little doubt that a Yamamoto effort would fit right into the week's leisurely schedule. Nevertheless, his announcement last month that he would show his spring collection on the eve of the fall couture took the fashion world by surprise. "In this contemporary age, I felt that there was no difference between haute couture and ready-to-wear," Yamamoto said then. He attributed the move to multiple factors: a desire to show in a quieter context than the ready-to-wear season provides, emotions felt over Yves Saint Laurent's retirement, being "lazy about trends" and his belief that "I'm not a standard fashion designer."

    He has a point. However one defines "standard designer," it is surely not someone who reins in a flock of peers for his show, but Marc Jacobs, Kenzo Takada and Martine Sitbon all turned out, along with Azzedine Alaia, who co-hosted a post-show book party for Yamamoto's "Talking to Myself," and Donna Karan, who has been in Europe so long she's practically living in exile.

    They all settled in for an exquisite ode to discreet drama and stellar craftsmanship. Yamamoto departed dramatically from his most recent efforts in his embrace of deliberate high chic over athletic and street themes, while leaving plenty of room for yin and yang. He deftly glammed up militaristic and utilitarian references -- every coat and jacket a delight of construction, the billowing, faux-rugged suspender skirt and delicate lace strapless a dream -- and not surprisingly, saluted Saint Laurent in soft looks that wrapped and tied at the neck. For evening, Yamamoto struck a masterful chord between Penn and zen with a group of black evening dresses, each uniquely off-kilter. Throughout, he worked in a palette of navy and black, only digressing with a spectator motif as simple as a crisp shirt and sober skirt or as flamboyant as sweeping frocks with illusion tops and bold photo prints -- bumble bee, frog, fish. Nature's bounty and then some.

    Word count: 388
    Copyright [​IMG] 2002 Fairchild Publishing Inc.


    Women wear the trousers for Yamamoto's show-stealer.
    24 January 1998
    The Guardian
    THIS season's Paris menswear shows had barely kicked off when Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto sent out a collection - modelled entirely by women. Among the all-female cast were fashion designer Vivienne Westwood, actress Charlotte Rampling and former supermodel Ines de la Fressange, writes Alix Sharkey.

    Yamamoto undoubtedly gave Paris a mighty jolt on Thursday night by turning his men's collection, shown off with a 20-strong cast, into a celebration of the feminine. In a showroom near the Pompidou Centre, the show kicked off in a low-key way with some androgynous types. But then former Chanel muse, Ms de la Fressange, appeared - to roars of approval.

    Next came Ms Westwood in her own towering platforms, wearing a Chaplin-style black suit and bowler outfit. She camped it up for all it was worth, rolling her hips suggestively. "As soon as he called me, I agreed to do it," said the grande dame of British fashion. "Yohji is one of the few real originals in fashion."

    Gliding along the catwalk as if to the manner born, it was Ms Rampling who stole the show in a fake ocelot-trimmed, white alpaca coat and baby blue ski hat. Unlike some of the other "beginner" models, who failed to make the routine pause at the runway's end for the cameras, Ms Rampling hit the mark every time.

    Yamamoto's oversized garments were less formal than normal; largely big and black, but with the sharply tailored lines of recent years replaced by a more funky "hobo" style. Still there were the trademark minimal and military influences and eccentric details such as pleated seams. Indignation featured when Yamamoto's use of real fur, including wolf, was spotted cunningly passed off among the fakes.

    Tailoring and Sportswear Merge to Make the Classic Cool
    Suzy Menkes
    24 January 1998
    International Herald Tribune
    When Yohji Yamamoto sent out his entire fall menswear collection worn by women friends albeit mostly androgynous types like the beanpole former model Ines de la Fressange and the skinny actress Charlotte Rampling it marked a fashion moment.

    After years of gender bending and role reversal, fashion seems to have reached a balance between the sexes that may be easier to achieve in the wardrobe than in the workplace.

    Now men can wear fluffy sweaters and velvet suits as nonchalantly as women can don male tailoring. And with nothing less to prove about how outrageous men's clothes could be, the French fall shows, which run through the weekend, are about discreet luxury and a return to traditional tailoring values as seen through a prism of modern sportswear.

    For new generation designers, it is now cool to be classic providing that the eternal male wardrobe has absorbed evolutionary fashion changes in fabric and ease. The result? A revival of tailoring that incorporates the sportswear revolution and the overwhelming "casualization" of fashion. Read comfort fabrics, a super-light construction and athletic details.

    Paul Smith, once a streetwear designer, continued his love affair with the aristocracy that he began last season. Smith grabbed from milord's dressing room the glen checked suit, swankily cut with a single vent at the back, a terra-cotta tweed jacket and a pair of shrimp-pink cords, a chalk striped city suit and an embroidered velvet evening vest.

    Those elements were mixed together to give an insouciant touch to the classics and to create from the traditional a modern-romantic wardrobe. Although the first, countrified part of the show, with its leafy backdrop, bird-embroidered vests and Duke of Windsor-style tailoring was the strongest, the urban velvet suits and short fitted coats were stylish.

    But Smith insisted that seeing the show was only the half of it.

    "You have to look inside!" he said, referring to the handmade shirts, the hand-stitched purple silk lining to a black velvet jacket and the ribbon of crimson velvet inside the waistband of Prince of Wales pants old-style tailoring details that are now cherished.

    In his own hard-man fashion, Thierry Mugler was also on the English gentleman tack, giving traditional men's suitings a witty spin by using dog-tooth check and herring-bone for sweaters; gray flannel boots completed the total look. Touchy-feely fabrics like chenille and boiled Shetland softened Mugler's military cut, and moved the line forward in a strong show.

    To prove that young designers are into tailoring, the Transylvanian Udo Edling opened his show Friday of sleek modern suits with tailoring patterns drawn on the bodies of his models, jackets made out of the canvas toile or just a pair of gray flannel lapels. Dirk Schoenberger from Cologne gave the traditional a twist by making tailored cargo pants with open pockets and putting thick knits over jackets.

    Men's fashion is now about not statements but details hence Hermes encapsulating discreet luxury by using its legendary silk prints just on the under-side of a pocket flap on a sweeping highwayman's coat. Everything in this show was ultra-subtle, from the symphony of grays lighted with a flash of sky blue, primrose yellow or spring green, through the sportswear details: the crisscross underarm gusset on jackets, the leather toggle on the zipper of a cashmere cardigan and the glazed-kid sneakers.

    The designer Veronique Nichanian played gracefully with Hermes signatures like butter-soft leather, and if the parade seemed whisper quiet, it was also ultra-classy.

    At Lanvin, Dominique Morlotti was also into discretion, adding only colors like wine-dreg red and bruised-plum to his palette of grays, chocolate to tobacco browns and beiges although variety came with interesting textures from felted wools and alpaca through tough leathers and padded cottons. Since modern fashion is in the mix, Lanvin caught that in gray parka matching the suit underneath as though sport and city had melded into one look. Morlotti is strong on outerwear, especially well-proportioned short, sporty coats and the occasional sweep of long.

    Just when you thought that the short topcoat, from car coat to knee length, was the height of fashion, the fall collections are coming up with a challenge. At Issey Miyake, the designer Naoki Takizawa gave long coats his best shot, making them modernist in silicone-glazed cotton, as soft as jerseys when the fabrics were washed in an alkaline solution, or luxurious in cashmere, with funnel necklines. They also came as beige scarf coats with fringing at neck and hem. Those neutral colors in inventive fabrics contrasted with the eye-popping batik prints that opened the show, but worked only when the pattern was reduced to faded dots on a shirt.

    Joe Casely-Hayford showed a collection as if, in the British designer's words, a "hidden camera" had filmed tough guys in a public housing project. If you forgot the knickers (especially in fluffy mohair) and the low-slung pants with flopping front flaps, there were strong tailored pieces. The designer saw double, putting a short sleeved sweater over a long version and using the double shirt as a signature. Casely-Hayford also endorsed the zippered cardigan that is becoming the alternative jacket of the new fall season.

    The absence of color, with a predominance of gray, is putting designers with a strong palette out on a limb. Christophe Lemaire handled color well for his close-to-the-body, French schoolboy silhouette, playing with bordeaux and purple for a felt coat and its scarf.

    When you think of the subtly of Claude Montana's past palette with its tender gradations of tone, his colors seemed out of sync not just with current fashion, but also with his own aesthetic. He showed orange mohair coats, a brown sweater licked with a pattern of glowing flames and striped or window-pane checked suits in red and orange, although there were a few marginally quieter pieces in beige dog-tooth checks with the new softer shoulder and rounded neckline. And the designer was defiant about his get-out-your-sunglasses colors.

    "It's time to wake up with color," Montana said.

    Ignore the women models and Yamamoto's show was still appealing. Taking a generous silhouette, he created long coats and his signature square-cut suits, but gave them a spine of overstitching at the back to emphasize the straight cut. Tailors' basting stitches were used as random decoration.

    Modern romantic was also the story in this collection, spelled out in the tactile fabrics, including the furry collars on coats, fleecy jersey jackets, clotted-cream or khaki cottons and damask-woven pattern.

    But why those women, of different ages and types, to show the clothes?

    "I started by thinking about who is my customer," the designer said backstage. "My customers are not businessmen and I know that many women wear my men's clothes and it seemed very normal."

    SUZY MENKES is fashion editor of the International Herald Tribune.

    WWD 1997
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    WWD 1998
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    WWD 1999
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    Yohji Yamamoto
    The Observer, Oct 7, 2001;
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    * * *

    also was lucky to pick up a ss00 suit


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    the collection is really beautiful and perhaps my favorite. a lot of the usual archives don't capture the garments well (obviously motion is one component) because 2-3 looks were sent out at once so they didn't bother taking pics of everything. worth a look if you've not seen and are interested (i know it's been posted before at a few times already but it's worth having links nearby)




     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2015
    8 people like this.
  5. David Park

    David Park Member

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    I was watching SNL last night and saw D'Angelo's performance of 'Really Love' and his outfit reminded me a lot of YY's stuff (wouldn't be surprised if it was). I remember seeing a scarf/wrap like what D'Angelo is wearing from a YYPH collection but don't remember exactly which season it was from. Can anybody identify which collection(s) had the full body wrap/scarves? Maybe it was attached to the jacket itself, I can't seem to remember.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2015
  6. davidlee388

    davidlee388 Senior member

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    [​IMG]
    left to right:- YYPH SS07 suspender coat, YYPH SS10 fedora, YYPH SS09 Born To Kill blazer, YYPH AW04 Madness zipper pants, YYPH AW11 monkey boots, YYPH SS02 embroidered blazer, YYPH SS12 hakama pants, YYPH SS05 number zip blazer, YYPH SS13 hooded parka, YYPH AW04 Madness zipper blazer, YYPH SS11 Yohji Uniform.

    Snapshot taken 3 months ago from the photo shoot for the Yohji Archive Story published by Men's Folio Indonesia. Privileged to be involved in such a project ( and put my little collection to good use ) to pay a fitting tribute to the Master Yohji Yamamoto. Pieces ranging between 2000 and 2013. Special thanks to Arseto Adiputra ( photographer + editor ), Alexander Harley ( fashion stylist ), Jody Taylor ( hair stylist ) and Alexander Beck ( supermodel ) for making this happen. Such fun time :)

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
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    Left out my own little profile piece and added this unused one.
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    9 people like this.
  7. sepp

    sepp Senior member

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    @Parker
    Thanks for the insight.

    @Shah
    Those articles are indeed enriching this thread.

    @David
    Nice. Is that you 2nd from left on the photo shoot?
     
  8. davidlee388

    davidlee388 Senior member

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    You mean the short one? Yes, next to a 1.94m catwalk model....
     
  9. sepp

    sepp Senior member

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    Next to the 1.94m model...everyone is short. LOL!


    Good thing for us Yohji makes clothes that fit all shapes and height.
     
  10. volcano

    volcano Member

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    Does anyone here have info on an album from 1998 called "Dog of Terror" where Yohji is listed as the main and only artist? Great outfits by everyone recently, always a joy to catch up on this thread.
     
  11. leviticus

    leviticus Member

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    Nice feature @davidlee388 , thanks for sharing!

    Does anyone here have experience hand-washing silk? Not sure what season they're from, but I have a pair of trousers that are in need of a cleaning but the care tag has worn off. Suggestions would be most appreciated. Thanks in advance, L
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2015
  12. Ulf-S

    Ulf-S Well-Known Member

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    I use the hand wash cycle on my washing machine for wool, silks and cashmere. Most things don't actually need to be dry cleaned, but i leave items with more complicated constructions and interfacings to the cleaner so that I don't have to worry about the pressing (I'm just lazy, I could do it). Scarfs, sweaters and trousers get dumped into the washing machine.
     
    1 person likes this.
  13. leviticus

    leviticus Member

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    Thanks for sharing @Ulf-S. Into the bucket they go!
     
  14. xeraphim

    xeraphim Senior member

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    the trousers are available over at SVMoscow and 4 in case you're still looking.
     
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  15. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    5 people like this.
  16. accordion

    accordion Senior member

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    Hey guys, I ended up getting this long blazer from Old Lyric. There's no care tag but the store tag says it's from 04. Anyone have any idea when it's from? I don't own any Yohji besides this piece, so I figured I either have to buy more clothes, not necessarily Yohji, to go with this blazer or just sell it. But if it is a rare piece I'd rather keep it as a collector. Thanks for help. The wrinkles are from my not knowing how to fold clothes properly.


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    Last edited: Feb 3, 2015
  17. Abraxis

    Abraxis Senior member

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    Why collect pieces that don't seem to particularly speak to you, which this piece does not seem like it does.

    Rarity for rarity's sake seems a little silly since it's not like that piece is going to at some point be so in demand that the appreciation in value will justify the space it takes up or the trade off cost in you keeping it and not putting money into something you are more into.
     
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  18. Parker

    Parker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    that long jacket looks pretty cool to me. reminds me of the newer AW13 pieces. looks like it fits you pretty nicely, but the sleeves are too short for that proper yohji look. is that a cinch tie around the waist? I can see it in the interior photo.

    great photos of AW15 pickpock. thanks for that.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2015
  19. davidlee388

    davidlee388 Senior member

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    @accordion regarding your query:-

    Every Yohji piece is rare, which isn't especially if it is at least 10 years old? In other words every vintage Yohji piece is collectible to a certain degree but the wearer has to like it to justify even keeping it. If there is no care tag inside the pocket someone must have removed it ( even samples have tags ) which has already affected its authenticity.The sleeves look far too short, agree with @Parker
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2015
  20. surver

    surver Well-Known Member

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    yohji's inspiration for aw15:

    Liu Dan's THE DICTIONARY, 1991

    [​IMG]
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    Last edited: Feb 4, 2015
    1 person likes this.

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