Yohji, Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love The Looser Fit (Yohji Yamamoto Thread)

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Ivwri, Dec 29, 2011.

  1. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    Please post if you have the time! I'm very curious. I've noticed his use of buttons over and over on blazers and pants. He really allows you to customize how you wear a garment by making things adjustable, but then the adjustable pieces themselves add to the design. I almost feel his clothing is more three-dimensional than that of most other designers. Someone may cut a great jacket, but the lapels lie flat and the pockets lie flat. With Yohji things are rarely flat. He adds layers and pockets in places you don't normally expect them, and that adds another layer to the design. Not every piece is like that, of course. But it's something you see over and over. Some of the FW12 button-ups, for instance, have pockets around the midsection. They're not really functional (anything you put in would fall out since they open to the side rather than the top), but they add another layer of fabric (and space) that makes the shirt a little cooler. So many clever details. Preaching to the choir, of course...
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012


  2. Ivwri

    Ivwri Senior member

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    .
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012


  3. Ivwri

    Ivwri Senior member

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    Lol, yeah it is. He actually comes across like the kind of person that would be really cool to hang out with just talking about absolutely nonsense and having a drink. Hehe.

    Good thing is that even with all that writing you can tell he doesn't take himself seriously.



    I just edited my post and added in the text. I will dig out the book and type up on the one on pockets too if it is not too long :D
     


  4. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    :D Interesting read, haha. Thanks for that. I've heard the book is a little...out there. I still kinda want to pick it up just to page through it every so often. Doesn't seem like it needs to be read start to finish.
     


  5. the shah

    the shah Persian Bro #2 and enabler-in-chief

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    there's a 40 page pdf available floating around here or there that gives you a glimpse. i didn't enjoy it that much, so i haven't gone to my shelf where the actual book sits but i think many others have different opinions :eek:

    thanks asobu i agree the linen and looseness of this go even better ! it's actually been too hot to even wear that recently hah
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012


  6. the shah

    the shah Persian Bro #2 and enabler-in-chief

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    I just watched Zatoichi a few nights ago, for which Yohji did the costume design. Maybe knowing that going into the film had me focusing too much on the outfits but they really were fantastic.

    also then saw twighlight samurai which has nothing to do with anything other than the fact that it was a good movie and lot of hakamas on display :D
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012


  7. Ivwri

    Ivwri Senior member

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    Yeah you definitely can just flick through the pages and read whatever catches your fancy at that moment. Just going through it now actually and got caught again by the section on sleeves and while he actually goes into some technical stuff about sleeve construction and even the origin of the raglan sleeve (invented by the English General of the same name who got injured in the Battle of Waterloo), there are also these weird asides (fugues?) into poetry/song lyrics scattered in between all of that. Heh. I enjoyed it though, but then again I do like a bit of a pretentious ramble. Your mileage may vary of course as can be seen with shah's own reaction to it :lol:

    One of my favourite passages in the book -

     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012


  8. the shah

    the shah Persian Bro #2 and enabler-in-chief

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    haha i think the pdf consisted mostly of this which is what put me off, i should probably give it a proper read before offering an opinion :p
     


  9. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    that sort of thing really puts me off. i almost never like it. in fact, the only instance I can think of when I've ever liked prose turning into poetry is in Ahab's weird meditations in Moby Dick. but maybe i'll go flip through the book and see if I'm interested. i still have to watch Notebook on Cities and Clothes too.
     


  10. davidlee388

    davidlee388 Senior member

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    Pockets and buttons.... perhaps those are my subconscious reasons to acquire the vest, the rayon coat and those Y's YY cargos lol
     


  11. Ivwri

    Ivwri Senior member

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    Yeah, you should have a look and see. I put a link to a PDF of excerpts from it in the OP so you should be able to have an easy glance through it.

    @david hah, maybe they are indeed ;).

    I should also put this here since I did end up typing it out in the end -

    Yohji on pockets -


    When did women begin to put their hands in their pockets? Did it start with Marlene Dietrich? We can be sure, at least, that it started after women began wearing men's clothes, and also that in the current age that masculine pose is fully accepted, considered just another fashion. Nevertheless, I find I still like to attach pockets.

    When I think of men posing with their hands in their pockets, I think of James Dean and Robert Mitchum. The pose suggests a man living on the borders and with ties to the underworld, it suggests rebellion, scorn, resistance, and a certain skepticism. One might be in Shinjuku, Paris or New York, the country does not matter. Take a stroll down an alley in a seedy district and a shady character will approach from the other direction. Jammed in his pockets, his hands will already be clenched, ready for battle. In the next instance he pulls a hand out of his pocket, armed with his key chain.

    As a child, my pockets were for storing treasures. I would stuff them with all sorts of things. Even today my pockets serve in place of a bag. Walking around with anything more than a wallet is unthinkable to me. In my right pocket I put my cash, in my left pocket I have my handkerchief, lighter, and keys. If my jacket has a breast pocket to hold my passport, then I can even do without an overnight bag.

    Men's pockets are boldly practical. I have some heavy-duty wear that has thirteen pockets, and I have been wearing it for years. There is simply nothing that beats it in terms of practicality. One can live in clothes like this. One can set out on a journey.

    The pockets on clothes for everyday use must comfortably hold a wallet, they must not be poorly placed and require one to grope in order to access them. They fail, too, if the overall silhouette is disrupted when the hands are put in the pockets.

    The placement, shape, number, opening, angle and depth of a pocket depend on the purpose of the garment. In general, if the relative weight of the cloth rests close to the stomach and the fabric falls well, a pocket can be successfully placed anywhere. To tell the truth, quite often while doing the preliminary stitching on a garment I have snipped open a pocket hole with a scissor to find the garment naturally respond with a wide-mouthed grin - the pocket has found its home.

    Strictly speaking, just as there is such a thin as the ideal spot for a button, there is also the perfect place for the pocket. A minimalist approach to this feature would be to forgo the angled approach and instead simply slice parallel to the body and attach a pocket.

    I read somewhere, perhaps in a medical book, that people's grief gathers in their ankles. Grief, sometimes dating back decades, sinks towards the earth and gathers in the ankles. People believe that they have gotten over those sad events, and they press forward as usual in pursuit of their own backs as they carry some idealized vision of who they are. It is all rather paradoxical: they carry with them, in each and every step, the very grief that they believe they have trampled underfoot.

    There are women who have passed through the gates of hell and learned of both the bitter and sweet in life. At times grief will rise from them only to then fade away, like burning incense. The scent never clongs to her. These women are the truly well bred, the truly noble, and it is to them that I would like to offer that perfected pocket designed with the single slice of the razor.

    No matter how elegant the evening dress, I want very much to attach a pocket. If it has no pocket, it means that the woman will have to carry a handbag. And with that handbag comes the silly concern that it might be stolen. An inconvenience is there from the very start.

    One who has bought a tremendously expensive diamond necklace worries about it being stolen at a gala event and so wears instead on that day an imitation. Nowhere do we see more clearly the painful absurdities of a human being's desire to possess things. When we desire some expensive item, we ar eovercharged for it; when we go to sell that item, the offers are low. The characterization might be overly reductive, but the fact remains that our desire to possess things always leads in the end to our being forcefully parted from them at a loss.

    And so come to me with them in your pockets, everything important to you in your pockets.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012


  12. cupper

    cupper Senior member

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    I'm waiting for a Y's for men jacket (pre-1999) with fabric code 100, do you guys know if it can be the same mythical wool gabardine as YYPH?
     


  13. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    It's funny he mentions James Dean. If you watch East of Eden, which is my favorite performance of James Dean's, he's got his hands in his pockets almost constantly. It's notable because at one point in the beginning of the movie he even runs with his hands in his pockets, which draws attention to the fact that he has them there because it looks so unnatural. There's also that classic photo of James Dean in Times Square in his big trenchcoat with his cigarette in his mouth and hands jammed in his pockets. Never thought about it, but I can see the influence that image (or that sort of image) has in Yohji's work. Yohji is right the way he describes it, though I would add that it suggests an outsider.

    [​IMG]
     


  14. Ivwri

    Ivwri Senior member

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    Yeah I agree completely with your suggestion of an outsider. At its most extreme and most romantic I think Yohji's clothing is for outsiders. All that talk of rebels and punk(s) and people like James Dean, clothing as armor etc. it all points towards that sort of person. An outcast (willing or otherwise) from society.
     


  15. Parker

    Parker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    kind of a plain fit today. I counted 30 total buttons btween pants and shirt!

    [​IMG]

    Ys rayon/wool loose weave navy camp shirt
    YYPH SS09 "sailor" pants with lots of buttons and double pockets front and back
    Engineered Garments "old sport" tropical wool mechanics cap
    AA tee and canvas Supergas
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012


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