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Writing paper, need honest thoughts, what comes to mind when you think of an attorney

pg600rr

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I am writing a paper for a legal reelism course. It is basically a self reflecting paper about my law school experience, why I want to be lawyer, how I envisioned a lawyer as a kid and now as a law student.

It is going to start of with my childhood views and how I perceive lawyers being portrayed to the public via film, TV, reality shows, etc. I then plan to include some of the opinions and views of others (lawyers and non-lawyers) and compare them with my own. I am then going to view numerous lawyer films (starting with TKAMB) and analyze the portrayal of lawyers in each movie and sort of pick out what I see as the truths and falsities.

So I am looking for public opinion (both lawyers and non-lawyer views are needed) of how people envision lawyers whether it be money hungry scumbags, cheating their way to riches or people mortgaging their future to wield the power to help others or even somewhere in between.

Any comments would be greatly helpful, I am trying to get a wide range of serious views (ie more than one sentence and thought out), if anyone would like to contribute that would be great.
 

unjung

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Here's a three sentence response: overly concerned with pedantic minutiae. Always in the way of getting real work done. Always coming up with reasons to prevent other team members from success: "we can't do that, because of the miniscule risk of X."
 

TexasLidig8r

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We're pains in the ass....

Until you need us to save your own.

 

Piobaire

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Originally Posted by TexasLidig8r
We're pains in the ass....

Until you need us to save your own.



This is factually accurate. The thing is though, you're saving our asses from other lawyers.

Going into law is one of those theory/fact dichotomies I think. In theory, it's pretty damn noble. I will be diplomatic, and say that the reality is usually far from noble.
 

Agnacious

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My thoughts of Lawyers are based on my social and professional interactions with them over the last 20 odd years of my professional life. I am not a lawyer and I do not mean to offend anyone, and I am pretty sure if I say "With all due respect" I can say whatever I want.

So, with all due respect:

I have found them to be a middle intelligence, profoundly uncreative lot who pride themselves on knowing the "rules of engagement" and believe their value to society is shown though the application of said rules.

If life were a pool game, putting some English on the shot would be out of the question. Not only are they not capable of thinking outside the box, they would prefer it if everything happened inside the box, using prescribed rules, that, of course, they know.

Unlike other professions, a Lawyers skills and abilities do not have much worth outside of the practice of law. Their lack of creativity limits their potential opportunities in fields where original thought is valued and their pedantic personalities leave them unfit to lead.

I am thankful there are people who are suited for this career and in spite of what I wrote, the only bad experiences I have had could only be described by the word tedious. I am more thankful I am suited for areas that require creativity and leadership, though I suppose if I were not, I wouldn't know any better.
 

TexasLidig8r

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lol.. Agnacious...

Has your exposure been mainly to corporate and transactional lawyers?

I have found my fellow litigation brethren to be quite different than the rather colorful picture you so eloquently painted.
 

pg600rr

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Originally Posted by Agnacious
My thoughts of Lawyers are based on my social and professional interactions with them over the last 20 odd years of my professional life. I am not a lawyer and I do not mean to offend anyone, and I am pretty sure if I say “With all due respect” I can say whatever I want.

So, with all due respect:

I have found them to be a middle intelligence, profoundly uncreative lot who pride themselves on knowing the "rules of engagement" and believe their value to society is shown though the application of said rules.

If life were a pool game, putting some English on the shot would be out of the question. Not only are they not capable of thinking outside the box, they would prefer it if everything happened inside the box, using prescribed rules, that, of course, they know.

Unlike other professions, a Lawyers skills and abilities do not have much worth outside of the practice of law. Their lack of creativity limits their potential opportunities in fields where original thought is valued and their pedantic personalities leave them unfit to lead.

I am thankful there are people who are suited for this career and in spite of what I wrote, the only bad experiences I have had could only be described by the word tedious. I am more thankful I am suited for areas that require creativity and leadership, though I suppose if I were not, I wouldn't know any better.


This is exactly what I am writing about and what has been discussed in great detail in my class. The teacher of my course is actually petitioning to have the legal curriculum change with the addition of numerous "creative" and "leadership" type courses. It is something that is completely deficient in the law school curriculum and we are pounded by the idea of conforming to the rules the minute you enter as a 1L. In my two years in law school I have completely changed both in personality and my way of looking at the world and thinking in general. Basically I am trying to get out of that non-creative mold I have put myself into. It is rare that you have the opportunity to do an opened ended free range project on whatever you want, and this is what my prof. has provided for, she is trying to get us to think about what it really means to be a lawyer, not to just go with the program and follow.

The one comment I disagree with, is when you mentioned that the law doesn’t require creativity and leadership. I think this varies greatly depending on the situation and area of law. Granted there are always rules in place but there is a great deal of creativity in litigating a case or working through complex mergers.
 

Nouveau Pauvre

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The nadir of western civilization.

A horrid, many-tentacled creature that ensnares you in it's foul grasp and smothers you with a growing sense of Lovecraftian dread.

Well below garbage workers in terms of contributions to society.

Entirely deserving of the morbid, cruel, tasteless jokes at their expense.

Parasitic.
 

Piobaire

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I think it is very fair say, that the largest beneficiaries of the legal system in US, are lawyers.
 

skidsm

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Originally Posted by unjung
Here's a three sentence response: overly concerned with pedantic minutiae. Always in the way of getting real work done. Always coming up with reasons to prevent other team members from success: "we can't do that, because of the miniscule risk of X."

I'm a lawyer. Your quote is spot-on. And to prove your first two points, I will note that your response is not comprised of sentences as represented.

Thank you.
 

RJmanbearpig

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We don't mind thinking outside the box. We just want to make sure we can put another box around that thinking.
 

Agnacious

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Originally Posted by TexasLidig8r
Has your exposure been mainly to corporate and transactional lawyers?

Yes for the most part, and some patent lawyers early on and I dated a few. Perhaps things are different in litigation, is this a case where the 95% is giving the remaining 5% a bad name.


Originally Posted by pg600rr
The one comment I disagree with, is when you mentioned that the law doesn't require creativity and leadership. I think this varies greatly depending on the situation and area of law. Granted there are always rules in place but there is a great deal of creativity in litigating a case or working through complex mergers.

Perhaps that was a bit uninformed since I don't know the inner workings and all the areas of law. I don't doubt the value they add in the field, I just don't know how portable it is.
 

robin

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Be sure to include a section on foyers.
 

TexasLidig8r

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Agnacious... that explains much.

My legal brethren who practice transactional or corporate work... well, I will tactfully say that I would not be able to tolerate the drudgery, the endless oceans of documents and papers and being chained to your desk. I would quickly pass away from boredom.

In court however, it's part science, part math, part art form. It's comparable to being on stage and performing.. yet, there is something tangible at risk. You're required to be able to "read" people very quickly, to have some insight into human nature. You must be a skilled tactician while at the same time, being required to "entertain" the jury. It is not enough that they receive the facts that support your case.. you must, enthrall them.

The first mistake a lot of trial lawyers make when they start trying cases is that they believe they have to first sell their case to the jury. They fail to understand that in any endeavor in which you are trying to persuade, you must sell yourself first.

To be able to verbally "cross swords" with your opponent, to out think them, to out maneuver them... to put on a case, to enlighten, to entertain... the adrenaline soaring... that is the essence of why some become attorneys... instead of businessmen who have a law degree.
 

Piobaire

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Originally Posted by TexasLidig8r
To be able to verbally "cross swords" with your opponent, to out think them, to out maneuver them... to put on a case, to enlighten, to entertain... the adrenaline soaring... that is the essence of why some become attorneys... instead of businessmen who have a law degree.

Heaven forbid that, you know, the facts and pertinent laws should have the spotlight.

That's everything most lay people see wrong with courtroom litigation. It ain't about facts or justice, it's about who plays the game the best.
 

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