Working with French Cuffs

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Leaveitothexperts, Sep 25, 2006.

  1. Leaveitothexperts

    Leaveitothexperts Senior member

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    I have always liked the look of french cuffs but only recently started wearing them.

    If you hold up your arms forward, parallel to the ground, palms facing down, the cuff is not at a "3-o'clock" position (for the right arm) or "9-o'clock" for the left, but more like 4 o'clock (right), 8 o'clock (left) position. I find this angle a little difficult to work with especially when typing on a keyboard or resting my forearm on a table. What this does is it makes the upper part of the cuff turn up by the end of the day.

    Am I doing something wrong, did I buy the wrong shirts? Is it just the way it is supposed to be? Do I just need to get used to it?

    Can someone help or give solutions?
     
  2. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    I'm not sure what you mean by the "upper part of the cuff". You mean where it's fold back?
    It might just be a getting-used-to-it thing. I used to be conscious of my french cuffs, but no longer. Are your cuffs tight enough? Or are they sliding around when you adjust your arms, type, etc.?
     
  3. Leaveitothexperts

    Leaveitothexperts Senior member

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    I'm not sure what you mean by the "upper part of the cuff". You mean where it's fold back?
    It might just be a getting-used-to-it thing. I used to be conscious of my french cuffs, but no longer. Are your cuffs tight enough? Or are they sliding around when you adjust your arms, type, etc.?


    Picture yourself as I first described. At the button holes you could say that there is a top and a bottom flap that is held together by the link. It is this top part I am referring to (yes, it is the folded back part).

    My cuffs are not tight perse, if I rotate my arms, they don't slide; the cuff moves with it - Not sure if my description is clear enough[​IMG]
     
  4. Tomasso

    Tomasso Senior member

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    Photos would help to illustrate your query.
     
  5. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    Picture yourself as I first described. At the button holes you could say that there is a top and a bottom flap that is held together by the link. It is this top part I am referring to (yes, it is the folded back part).

    My cuffs are not tight perse, if I rotate my arms, they don't slide; the cuff moves with it - Not sure if my description is clear enough[​IMG]

    I think that's clear. Basically you're getting "curl" on the outside of the cuff (the portion that would be at the very end of the sleeve if the cuff were unfolded) like you get on your collar points if you forget to put in collar stays? (Insert pitch for magnetic collar stays, the collar stays for people who forget their collar stays.)
    Does it seem like it's from the cuff catching on stuff, or just the fabric "wilting" a bit toward the end of the day?
     
  6. javyn

    javyn Senior member

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    Funny, I find that French Cuffs get in my way less than buttoned cuffs.
     
  7. Cantabrigian

    Cantabrigian Senior member

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    Cuffs that fit well tend to rotate less during normal movements. If they cuffs are a bit too big, they're likely to turn more.
     

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