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Wolverine 721LTD Shell Cordovan 1000 Mile Boot Review

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Crane's, Oct 21, 2010.

  1. ElDave

    ElDave Senior member

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    I honestly don't mean to be rude, but two things:

    1. If two people with experience in high end shoe care both tell you the same thing, maybe there's some merit to it.

    2. If you're incredibly worried about color variation in a pair of work boots that will be used in a work boot manner, why did you buy tan? Why didn't you buy dark brown or black, where the color variations that will inevitably happen would not be very (if at all) noticeable?
     
  2. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    Hell ElDave, to me it's not a matter of taking care of good leather products as much as it is with taking care of this specific product. Over the last three years I've explained all the why's how's and documented it all with pics to boot. But then again I'm also the guy who wears leather jackets in the rain with no ill effects but hey what do I know? LOL!
     
  3. bicktrav

    bicktrav Active Member

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    Crane's, I'm curious as to whether you'll be getting the 744s? If so, are you going to put them through the ringer the way you have your other 1000 miles? Would love to see another thread like this one.
     
  4. jcell

    jcell Member

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    In regards to 1. Good point.
    2. Also good point that I am thinking about as well. I guess I just liked the way the looked and felt, and read Crane's review of them and liked how they looked beat up. I think the fundamental flaw I'm having is I don't like how mine are looking all beat up. If that makes any sense. His seemed to lighten and they look cool. Mine are starting to fade and look not so cool. Well the right shoe is at least. Left is fantastic.
    Really the reason I Was worried about the color was because I don't quite know how sno seal works. My thinking was that because that area is fading in terms of color, then it would start to gray and not turn that golden brown color like I wanted. I guess that thinking is fundamentally flawed. I meant no offence by may statements. You have told me what you do to these shoes and I thank you for that. I'm confident that you know what you are talking about.
     
  5. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    As much as I would like to I do have to draw a line in the sand and stop. I'm sure the 744s would do just fine. Now if they do a shell boot in say whiskey or natural shell yeah it would be game on.


    A lot of the differences you see in color saturation is due to different lighting. Right now my boots are much darker than when they were new. Welcome to one of the nightmares of photography. Even though you conditioned your boots they still look dry. Lexol is a light conditioner and can't hold a candle to Filson boot oil for conditioning. You'll understand this once you get the boot oil and use it. The snoseal will also darken the leather up a bit. Once these treatments seep in the boots will lighten back up so don't fret that either. While we are on the subject of mine versus yours there is no way they can be compared. Your boots are new, mine aren't. My boots have seen things for days on end that yours will most likely never see. Hell my boots are just beginning to get a patina on them. It takes years not days, weeks or months for leather to age. Another thing to keep in mind is your boots will never look like mine. How they age and how the patina develops is unique to an individual user. Even if you went where I went and did what I do your boots might look similar but that's about as far as it will go.
     
  6. bicktrav

    bicktrav Active Member

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    Crane's, is Filson Boot Oil good to use on chromexcel and cordovan? Or is it good for just one of the types of leather? Also, what's the difference between Filson's Boot Oil and the Obenauf Leather Protector that they sell? I know you've gone over this stuff, but I've been searching through the threads and with the hundreds of pages, I'm having a hard time locating your thoughts.
     
  7. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    Bridle leather, Chromexcel, Predator and Cordovan are all vegetable tanned leather in whole or in part. Filson boot oil is specifically made for vegetable tanned leathers. There's nothing in it other than the oils and waxes that's used in the tanning process. If I didn't have a steady stream of Filson boot oil and snoseal I would be using Obenauf's products. LP was specifically invented to protect leather footwear in really nasty environments. Sound familiar? Obenauf says they made the oil to protect things like horse tack, saddles, boots and so on that are used in less harsh conditions. That should sound familiar as well. Many people have used Montana pitch blend but I'm not to sure about it. It has pine tar in it and it's my understanding that this component isn't all that good for leather. Same goes for Wolverine boot oil. It has the essential oils and waxes but there's pine tar in it. Other things to avoid is petroleum products and animal fats like real mink oil.

    So for general care Filson boot oil or Obenauf's oil.

    Gonna expose them to water, mud, muck, cow crap and so on you use Snoseal or LP in addition to boot oil.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. jcell

    jcell Member

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    Ahh now I understand. I forgot to tell you how I applied it. First pass I put it on a cloth and then went over the shoe. Second pass, I put it on my finger and then would rub it into a small area. Then more, and rub in. And I'd keep doing this. I didn't really think there was a wrong way to do it. If you've got a suggestion, I'm open to a new method. I was apprehensive about spraying the lexol right onto the shoe.
    Very, very informative. Please god tell me I bought the right stuff. http://www.filson.com/products/boot-oil.55101.html
    That is the stuff I got. Do I put it on the same way I put on the lexol, or do I use the hair dryer like the sno seal.

    There was also this at filson. I did not buy it. I did not think it was the right stuff. http://www.filson.com/products/filson-s-oil-finish-wax.69033.html
     
  9. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    The wax is for retreating oil finished tin, cover and shelter cloth. It's not made to treat leather. You got the right stuff. Now get an old rag and literally soak it with boot oil and wipe the entire boot down with it. Apply it liberally and I do mean liberally as in wet. You'll be surprised how fast it absorbs into the leather. Let them sit for a day and wipe them down with a dry rag and you're done. The boots will be a tad darker and feel oily. That settles down in a week or so as the oil penetrates and you wear them. When they get scuffed all you need to do is rub the spot with your thumb and it should disappear. If not a dab of oil rubbed in will fix it. After a week or so of treating them with oil you can treat them with Snoseal for added protection. Wipe them down with a damp rag, brush them and then follow my Snoseal instructions that are posted in this thread. They'll be more or less bullet proof after that. Retreating is subjective. Over time you'll learn when they are dry or need to be treated with oil and or Snoseal. Now if you go hiking in knee deep water all day with them they need to dry for a couple of days and treated with boot oil inside and out. In general you do want to apply boot oil every once and a while to the smooth leather inside the boot. The reason should be obvious.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2012
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  10. bicktrav

    bicktrav Active Member

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    Thank you. Great information!
     
  11. bicktrav

    bicktrav Active Member

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    Just bought the Filson Boot Oil and the Obenauf's LP.
     
  12. jcell

    jcell Member

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    Just did it. I applied it very Liberally. It darkened it a ton, and I can tell it's going to look awesome. You were SO right about how much thicker Filson oil is. WOW. It is amazing. Go ahead and say I told you so, You've earned it for putting up with all my questions.
     
  13. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    Told ya so......
     
  14. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    I don't think I've ever posted a pic of any of my boots when they were really filthy. Well here ya go. I went out with a buddy to Mark Twain Lake for a lil rock hunting. We went back to one of our honey hole mud flats to see if anything new popped out of the mud. The day before the lake was hit by storms that dumped about 1.6 inches of rain. We worked it over and another spot for about 5 hours. My buddy found a nice point and the best I could come up with was a broken Madison point and a few hammer stones. Not bad really since we did not wade like we usually do. It was cold out and the water isn't so warm these days.

    Anyway, if you keep them maintained muck like this just sits one the surface and doesn't penetrate into the leather causing stains and all kinds of other problems. About all I need to do with them is knock off the clods and wipe them down with a wet sponge and they're ready for another day. BTW these are my world famous original brown 1Ks.....

    [​IMG]
    Muddy Boots and a Point by DYSong Photography, on Flickr
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2012
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  15. bicktrav

    bicktrav Active Member

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    This is unreal! Thanks for posting. Makes the abuse mine see look downright amateur by comparison.
     
  16. ElDave

    ElDave Senior member

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    And here I felt like a badass stomping through a couple airports over the weekend...
     
  17. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    That pic is a good representation of how any pair of my 1Ks look after a day in the field. If it was warm out I would have waded in the water to get the mud off. It's easier to let them dry and then condition them then it is to brush that nice Missouri clay off them. Once it's dry it's like concrete. Fun stuff.
     
  18. bicktrav

    bicktrav Active Member

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    Crane's, out of curiosity, how long do you expect that muddied up pair of 1000 mile boots--or any other that you own--to last before they need to be replaced?
     
  19. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    Those boots in the pic are 3 years old. As long as the uppers don't split or I cut a hole in them on scree my guess would be 10 plus years.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2012
  20. MarioImpemba

    MarioImpemba Senior member

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    Cold ride into work this morning...

    [​IMG]
     

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