Wolverine 1000 Mile Boot Review

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Rollin Tumble, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. Willin

    Willin Senior member

    Messages:
    413
    Likes Received:
    99
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2010
    So I got 1000 Mile's in Rust. I am trying to determine how I should maintain the leather without spoiling the Rust color and darkening it drastically.

    It sounds like using Obenauf's or Sno-Seal will alter the color to be brownish which is not what I want to do.

    For regular maintenance of the Rust 1k's should I be using Montana Pitch Blend Leather Dressing and Saddle Soap to clean any dirt off? Is that all that I will need?

    Also if my boots have discolored scuffs on them should I be using a Rust colored polish to restore the color?

    Thanks a lot for clarification and advice!
     


  2. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

    Messages:
    2,040
    Likes Received:
    452
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Location:
    Norway
    I have now deceided to get some 1k Mile Boots, and tried them on for the first time today. I am usually a 8.5 - 9 in AE, Florsheims etc. and the Wolverines in 9 was pretty perfect, just a little heel slippage. So it's not always good to size 1/2 - 1 down. I tried on some Red Wings moc toe, and they fitted me good in 8.5.
     


  3. gernblandsten

    gernblandsten New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    I am a true size 11 and I ordered a 10.5 in Brown from Revolve Clothing. With 30% off as a first time buyer and free shipping, I got them for just under $230 bucks!

    They fit perfectly and didn't require any break in whatsoever. The leather is amazingly soft. I followed Crane's method of conditioning the boots, using snoseal, and though it darkened the brown a bit, they still look great and they're ready for anything. I want to put them on a pedestal and hug them and squeeze them all day long. I don't typically treat myself to shoes this nice.

    I've already managed to ding them in a couple of places, though. I'm wondering if anyone has a recommendation for a polish color that matches the brown well. I'm sure it's in this thread somewhere; I just haven't found it yet.

    Anyway, I highly recommend these shoes. They look great with just about anything.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2011


  4. Willin

    Willin Senior member

    Messages:
    413
    Likes Received:
    99
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2010
    

    Does anyone have an opinion on this? I have scuffs on the rust but don't want to change the color.

    There is a high quality cobbler down the block which I am considering but I am still nervous to let them buff my boots. They would probably do a fine job but I think I'd rather not risk any discoloration.

    Thanks!
     


  5. Roguls

    Roguls Senior member

    Messages:
    1,465
    Likes Received:
    165
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Location:
    Newburgh
    

    Stop worrying so much. The leather is Horween chromexcel, which is insanely robust. Use neat's foot oil for conditioning when you need (that is what Horween used before they shipped the leather to Wolverine), but, really, that should be done quarterly only. Just get a brush and buff the hell out of them to minimize scratches. But, again, chromexcel is not a dress leather, so the scuffs add up to character.
     


  6. entrero

    entrero Senior member

    Messages:
    1,082
    Likes Received:
    10
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    FAIK Chrome excel is a type of pull-up leather, meaning it's packed with oils and scratch resistant. Frequent brushing will suffice.
     


  7. cthip

    cthip Senior member

    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    17
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2009
    don't put anything on your chromexcel 1000 mile boots--they're already heavily oiled and "protected." you'll spend the rest of your life wearing them and trying to break down some of that protection! check again in six months, and if they feel dry you can try adding something, but i'd bet good $$$ you won't need anything.

    between two pairs of chromexcel boots (one wolverine, one alden), i've tried lexol, meltonian neutral polish, meltonian black polish, lincoln black polish, sno-seal, and neatsfoot oil. none of them have significantly improved or protected the leather. none of them have even really soaked into the leather (as mentioned it's already packed with oil!).

    the sno-seal may help with waterproofing, we'll find out this winter. the neatsfoot oil definitely softens the leather and speeds up break-in, but horween already treats with neatsfoot before the leather leaves the factory, so if you choose to use more neatsfoot, use it sparingly--one very thin/light coat should suffice. if you over-do it, you risk the leather getting too soft and floppy.
     


  8. Willin

    Willin Senior member

    Messages:
    413
    Likes Received:
    99
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2010
    

    Thanks for the advice, all.

    I was also reading the Horween blog and their official recommendations are very similar to what was said above. They say to use neatsfoot oil seldomly. Their primary recommendation for care is a damp cloth and regular brushing with horsehair.

    I'm glad it's that easy!

    Cheers
     


  9. ADDIC

    ADDIC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    

    Is that right? Weird because my left boot has a fair amount of scratches on the right side (near ankle) I don't know exactly how they got there either. Oh well.
     


  10. theclipper

    theclipper Senior member

    Messages:
    324
    Likes Received:
    468
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2007
    

    I've accumulated quite a few scratches as well after just a handful of wears.
     


  11. cthip

    cthip Senior member

    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    17
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2009
    chromexcel scratches. it's part of the character of the leather and will look more "distressed" and "worn-in" over time, but the first few look weird because the rest of the boot is still pristine.


    you have two choices:

    #1 use a colored shoe polish like meltonian or lincoln to cover the scratches. it works well but you will have to do it quite often--i do this 1-2x/week with my black work boots because it's required by my employer

    or

    #2 get over it. live with the scratches. keep wearing the boots and accumulate more scratches. it will look better over time. i do this with my other boots
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2011


  12. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

    Messages:
    2,168
    Likes Received:
    858
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2007
    Location:
    NBPT, MA
    A pull-up leather is one that slightly changes color when pressure is applied, a result of the tanning process. As has been said, it's waxier and/or oilier than full grain leather. This makes it very durable and water & stain resistant for work boots but perhaps not the best choice for fine, dress footwear. Fold a piece of pull up leather or scratch with your fingernail, and it will leave that [temporary] mark or discoloration. Full grain leather won't react the same way.

    This clip shows the difference between pull-up and full/top grain leather.


    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]
     


  13. brokeassp

    brokeassp Senior member

    Messages:
    1,098
    Likes Received:
    61
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2011
    I can`t make up my mind if I want the brown or black off revolve :|
     


  14. illumin8em

    illumin8em Senior member

    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    May 10, 2008


  15. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

    Messages:
    2,040
    Likes Received:
    452
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Location:
    Norway
    

    I have the exact same problem! If I look down on my autumn shoes 4/4 are brown, and it would be nice with a change. On the other hand, the rust and brown are so nice. :inlove:
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2011


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by