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Wolverine 1000 Mile Boot Review

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Rollin Tumble, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. Grayland

    Grayland Senior member

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    That's a great looking boot and a nice price as well.
     
  2. kmdsimpson

    kmdsimpson Senior member

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    Yeah. Why is Chippewa so much less expensive than Wolverine? Both made in US, right? Differences in materials or construction quality?
     
  3. slide13

    slide13 Senior member

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    I just got those Chippewas today. The leather is very similar to Chromexcel, but I don't think it actually is Chromexcel....which I'm sure is part of the lower price. Construction is very high quality, though maybe not with quite the polish and refinement of the Wolverine 1000 mile boots. Overall I think it's a great boot for the price. It's going to be my winter boot for the year to save my leather soled White's and my cordovan Alden's from the abuse that Wisconsin winters (and all the salt they put down around here) can put on a boot. Little pricier than the LL Bean Katahdin (which is another solid option) but the the style, sole, and leather make the extra cost worthwhile for me personally.
     
  4. NormanF

    NormanF Senior member

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    The Chippewa and the Wolverine are both made in the US. The difference in price comes down to I think not quality of manufacture but the finish of the leather. With more extensive leather finish, the Wolverine costs more.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2011
  5. bl@ster

    bl@ster Senior member

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    Quoted for truth. This assessment is right on.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011
  6. Roguls

    Roguls Senior member

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    These have a leather sole. Do not use them as snow boots. Get dedicated snow boots when the weather is disgusting. But for just wet weather, they're fine and will hold up, without doubt.

    For snow, look to Sorel or LL Bean.
     
  7. Roguls

    Roguls Senior member

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    Uh, really? No. And those Chippewas went up 30 bucks from a week ago. I went with the Steven Alan Thorogoods (the "Chukka") and they are awesome. Either one is a better option to the 1000 mile imo. Red Wing GT is a better looking boot than the 1000 mile as well. But just an opinion.
     
  8. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    Is this the general consensus? I was looking as these as my primary winter boots, which will include a lot of snow.
     
  9. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    The upper will hold up just fine in snow after treating with a wax like Obenauf LP or Sno-Seal. However, any shoe/boot with a leather sole won't offer much traction in the snow. My 1K's saw a fair amount of snow last year and held up fine but I wouldn't wear them sledding with the kids or anything like that. I do wear them around town in the winter.

    You could add a rubber/composite sole covering that will help in snow or yould hvae it re-soled with a lugged vibram. Or you could buy a boot like the RW GT that comes equipped with a lugged sole from the factory.

    I'll likely have my 1K's re-soled with the vibram mini lug when the leather wears out. In the meantime, I wear something else in the heavy snow.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2011
  10. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    Thanks, Patrick! Yeah, I will only use when commuting back and forth from college, and that's a total of about 500m of snow each way. Look on the bright side, my balance will be better than ever. :D I've been looking at the RW GT, but I like the history and craftmanship of the 1K's better.
     
  11. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    Also, the 1K's felt fantastic right out of the box. Very little break-in required. I found the GT's very stiff out of the box. I'm sure they'd break in nicely, but I loved that the 1K's were comfortable from day one.

    I'm still up in the air about adding a rubber/composite half sole for this winter. We had more snow last year than in the 10 before it. I really like the half soles that can be added to the leather like the Vibram 2341 Raptor:

    http://www.cobblersupplies.com/servlet/the-106/VIBRAM-2341-Raptor-Rubber/Detail

    [​IMG]

    It's not so beefy to ruin the aesthetics of the sleek leather sole but would add considerable grip...esp if you are walking a lot.

    The Vibram #435 is another option that doesn't seem overkill on a boot like the 1K.

    [​IMG]

    http://www.cobblersupplies.com/servlet/the-653/VIBRAM-435-Oil-Resisting/Detail

    Good luck with whatever you end up with. I'm loving my 1K's.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    Yeah, I have been thinking off adding a half-sole too, especially since the cost of a new sole is aprox. $ 200-300 here in Norway, and we get a lot of snow. Is it required to wear the soles down before you can put one of those vibrams on it ?

    I also love the leather laces, I have been drooling over your pics since the first time I saw them. Probably the reason why I'm getting these shoes. You wrote back then that you have loads of these, is it still possible to purchase some from you?

    I highly appreciate your help. :satisfied:
     
  13. DC Office Hack

    DC Office Hack Senior member

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    When I asked my cobbler about putting Vibram half soles on a pair of dress shoes, she told me that it was best to install them before the soles were worn out since the process involves shaving off a thin sliver of the sole so that the new half sole is flush with the rest of the sole. The cobbler couldn't do it if there was not enough leather for her to remove a layer without having to replace the entire sole.
     
  14. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    I've had vibram half soles attached (topy style) to a few pair of dress shoes/boots over the years. My cobbler mentioned the same thing about applying them before the sole is worn out. Just to clarify, my understanding is the leather sole can certainly be broken in or even well used, it just can't be to the point where a new sole is required, i.e., no holes or not worn through to the point that the leather has soft spots. Again, this is just my understanding. One cobbler indicated that he prefers to install topy type soles after the shoe has been worn a few times and not brand new, right out of the box. I assumed this was to improve the adhesive grip, kind of like roughing up the surface of an inner tube with sandpaper before applying a patch with adhesive.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011
  15. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    Thanks, I'll ask my cobbler and ask what he prefers.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011
  16. NormanF

    NormanF Senior member

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    Why? You could just buy the Branson in the US or Tyrol in Europe and not bother with resoling with Vibram. The 1000 is a good boot and the leather outsole is what makes it worth the investment for many people. Its boots that will last a lifetime.
     
  17. mikecch

    mikecch Senior member

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    ^ I wouldn't say that a leather outsole outclasses a synthetic one at all, and certainly not a prime reason to invest in a pair of boots.
    If you need a synthetic outsole, buy another boot or get it resoled/covered.
    For re-soling, Vibram or Biltrite (Cat's Paw!!!) are good options if you're in the Americas, Dainite (studded, med-/ridgeways) or Corinium (Victory, commando variants) in or around the UK are fantastic - plenty to choose from, and since the cost per unit differences between a high-end and lower-end product is low compared to the re-sole labour cost, don't cheap out.
     
  18. mojoe

    mojoe Member

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    Oct 17, 2011
    Hello all,

    I'm about to pull the trigger on either the Addison or the 1000 Mile and was wondering if anyone can report on whether the boots have expanded, shrunk, or stayed the same as new with extended wear?

    Thanks!
     
  19. malaujai

    malaujai Senior member

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    Toronto
    ^ I think with most leather boots, they will have a little bit of give after some initial wear? I think for these pair it would be best that they fit snug when you try them on as they will probably either stretch out a bit or re-form to the shape of your foot?
     
  20. althanis

    althanis Senior member

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    I just got my Wolverines in the mail from Revolve Clothing (Canada Post sucks). The total cost was $300, including taxes and duties. Much cheaper than the $395 + 13% taxes, which is the going price in Toronto.

    Pictures below at the bottom. Jeans are Unbranded selvage denims; in the background is my briefcase from Unlucky (Scott).


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    2 people like this.

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