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Wolverine 1000 Mile Boot Review

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Rollin Tumble, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. anrobit

    anrobit Senior member

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    Those mean streets of NYC must be tough indeed. Try Boston, or even further northward. You don't need LP at all. If you don't use it, your shoes won't spontaneously combust or melt into the pavement either.


    Ah right, endorsements. Just like Red Wings endorses mink oil, which has been shown to be a rather poor product. Just like HORWEEN recommends neatsfoot oil and VSC, which you NEVER mention. Quite a double standard you have there.

    Don't be pedantic. DFWII is a bootmaker. He has consistently endorsed the prodcuts I am suggesting. My answers are not ambiguous at all.

    You're also doing some nice mental gymnastics about LP there: "Each ingredient has a specific purpose that work in conjunction with each other." The product as a whole as a high melting point. What happens to the product when it gets cold? Does it sit on the surface? Does it absorb? Why is it's absorbance not an issue if you say the absorbance of coconut oil is one?
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. sam eh

    sam eh Active Member

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    here's a link
     
    2 people like this.
  3. MarioImpemba

    MarioImpemba Senior member

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    How much does this pic make your butt pucker?

    [​IMG]

    My 721's, oven-baked with SnoSeal.

    Ill effects? I guess I'm still waiting for those to show up a year and a half later on both CXL W1k's and shell 721's.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. misterjuiceman

    misterjuiceman Senior member

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    Oh my god. I thought you were joking. Anecdotal evidence still doesn't make it a good idea: I know folks who've smoked a pack a day for years and cite no ill effects.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2014
  5. MarioImpemba

    MarioImpemba Senior member

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    It's not getting any hotter in there or with a hair dryer than it is sitting in the back of a semi-trailer during shipping, or if you ever leave them in your car on a hot day, or under the sun.

    Is there a difference between beeswaxing CXL via snoseal versus beeswaxing CXL ala Predator leather?
     
  6. anrobit

    anrobit Senior member

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    1 person likes this.
  7. misterjuiceman

    misterjuiceman Senior member

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    I'm in the fragrance community too, and folks debate the potential for damage in the back of a truck in the summer, but I don't think it's a major concern. There shouldn't be direct sunlight, and there's several layers of insulation. I also don't think the truck gets nearly that hot in the first place. Either way, I buy my boots in cooler months, so I can't comment.

    As far as I know Predator leather isn't waxed with beeswax, and it's a little bit different from CXL. I'm also not against waxing shell (I am usually against waxing CXL), and I think most folks outside this thread wax their shell occasionally with Saphir or Kiwi wax. Either way, waxing leather soled boots doesn't really seem like a fruitful endeavor—the soles will probably be the limiting factor in the rain, especially with such an oily leather like CXL.
     
  8. SiegfriedFuerst

    SiegfriedFuerst Well-Known Member

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    Here's the White's About page where they explain it a little. Basically, they have a high arch made of leather, a deep heel cup and a standard position that has your foor angled down a bit. The arch breaks in to your foot in a month or so and it becomes really, really comfortable to stand in. The base price is $379, it goes up if you add exotic leathers or some customizations. Most of the makeups I've done have been about $400. I think it's +10 for pull loops, +10 for an extended tongue in a different leather, +10 for a double midsole ect.
     
  9. SiegfriedFuerst

    SiegfriedFuerst Well-Known Member

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    Primarily because they don't have insulation and my feet get cold.
     
  10. MarioImpemba

    MarioImpemba Senior member

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  11. Pecan89

    Pecan89 Well-Known Member

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    So what do you guys do in your boots that your so against putting any LP or so seal on them. Or do you just some how predict everywhere your going to have to walk in a day and what types of conditions those areas will be.
    Yea sure don't roll out in leather soles if it's pouring out.
    Its a casual boot that's gonna see most of its wear in the fall/winter/spring and all the shitty weather that brings
     
  12. anrobit

    anrobit Senior member

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    Again, snoseal is a terrible product. A product made of at least 60% drying mineral oils is not a product anyone should use to protect their boots.

    I'm not sure why you think leather will fall apart. I've submerged some of my shoes in water (unprotected) and they came out just fine. There's no need to "protect" most leather like it's made of glass, especially not if you live in the city.

    If you do happen to live in the conditions where you consistently (more than a few times per week) spend hours outside in horrendous conditions (not just a rainshower or the like) then you probably should use a protectant. In that case, LP is probably the best one on the market.

    However, for most people, that is simply unnecessary. All you have to do is brush and wipe down when you get home.
     
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  13. misterjuiceman

    misterjuiceman Senior member

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    Most people have regular schedules and can anticipate which types of environments they'll be in. I look at the weather before I leave for the day.

    I'd say if you're regularly wearing boots out into uncertain and rough conditions, the Wolverine 1K boot is likely not the appropriate boot for you, and a properly configured work boot from White's, Nick's, Viberg, et al. would serve you much better. The Wolverine 1K is a dress boot masquerading as a work boot, but there's nothing wrong with that—in its current iteration, it's just not a boot meant to be used for logging, hiking, and other activities. A decent oil-tanned leather will do much better than CXL for that sort of activity, which easily shows scuffs and scrapes when abused (just look the "patina" on Crane's plain-toed 1K boot).

    With regard to water—CXL is a very oily leather, and a properly conditioned pair will handle an impromptu storm very well without the use of Obenauf's LP or Sno Seal. Most CXL that hasn't been sitting around for a while will do just fine with brushing and an occasional treatment with Venetian Shoe Cream, as per Nicholas Horween's suggestion. Clogging up a CXL boot with bee's wax is entirely unnecessary.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2014
  14. cathpah

    cathpah Senior member

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    I'd love to get an answer to this question. I'm intrigued.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2014
  15. MarioImpemba

    MarioImpemba Senior member

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    Where are you getting that information? It's at least 60% beeswax from what I can ascertain.

    There are countless people who have been using SnoSeal for decades on their gear, and put a lot of trust in it. Clearly, it's doing something right.

    Jesus Christ, not this again.

    Here's what the oft-referenced DFWII had to say about VSC:

    "That said, I've used a lot of products over the years and even though Nick at Horween recommended Venetian Cream for cordovan, I was not overly impressed with it."

    Further:

    Quote:

    No product, not enough, too much, wrong product... it's leather; it's inherently durable. I'm getting so tired of arguing about which products are superior. May as well be arguing about which type of shoe looks the best.

    Did I need to SnoSeal my boots? Nah. Would I do it again? Who knows. Do I regret doing it? Hell no. The leather on my W1K's is doing just fine, and worrying about some meaningless microscopic damaged from product or heat is just asinine. They're pliable, comfortable, not rotting, not cracking, not creasing in any bull penis way, and are water resistant which is nice for trampling around the NW and for hiking.

    Next time I treat my Wolverines I'm going to throw away all my products and just jizz into a rag and wipe them down because of the natural lubrication properties after I eat a lot of macaroons.
     
    3 people like this.
  16. anrobit

    anrobit Senior member

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    Sno seal has a lower wax content than LP, and contains mineral spirits. I don't know how often I have to repeat that. There were countless people who used neatsfoot oil for decades too, but that rots stitching.

    As a whole, your post wasn't very constructive. You could piss on shell and it would be fine. This isn't about what would be fine, but what would be best. If you don't want to have the debate, you don't have to participate in it. For what it's worth, I agree on VSC and with DFWII's comments on it (although I disagree on some of his other stances such as on gemming). I believe misterjuiceman's comment was intented to counter Crane's point about manufacturer recommendations.

    At the end of the day, you can do whatever you want with you 1ks, but that doesn't mean your application is what is best. Again, if you don't want to have the debat, don't join it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2014
  17. misterjuiceman

    misterjuiceman Senior member

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    DFWII also thinks that every Goodyear-welted shoe is doomed for failure because of the gemming, so either way you're screwed. Nicholas Horween makes the leather, and he's not the only one who uses it, Viberg goes as far as shipping out a bottle with every boot they sell, but my point wasn't that VSC is an excellent product, and I just used it as an example, as @anrobit mentioned.

    At the end of the day, chrome-tanned (and vegetable retanned) leather is not the same as living skin, and with regard to shell, it's not actually skin at all; it was muscle. Either way, I think we can both agree that Lubriderm isn't a good idea for leather.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2014
  18. HOT Sriracha

    HOT Sriracha Senior member

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    Can anyone recommend a good thin insole for the 1000K boots?

    I don't want anything too bulky that will make the boot too tight when wearing. Any links to purchase would be awesome. Thanks!
     
  19. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    So when do the questions get answered about coconut oil? I'm not the one who's telling people how great it is for conditioning shoes. As far as I'm concerned anyone who is considering doing this should be asking all these questions before they let a drop of it hit their shoes or boots.

    Anrobit, as a matter of fact you were asked about the long term effects of applying this and your answer was you didn't know.

    You were asked what other leather treatments contain coconut oil other than the one you mentioned. So far you have provided no evidence that it's used anywhere else. You said it's widely known and used by the industry yet it appears that is entirely untrue. The only thing that can be gleaned from that is it is not a suitable ingredient or component for leather care. Unless you provide significant information to the contrary it appears the entire shoe/leather care industry stands against you. If it was that great it would be in everything. Instead it's glaringly absent.

    The same goes for all the shoe and boot makers out there. I have found not a single one who tells you to smear coconut oil on your footwear let alone anything else. Again the stark absence of support in this regard should send up red flags to anyone who's contemplating doing this.

    You were asked about some other specifics on coconut oil and once again there is no answer forthcoming. When it does go rancid and it will what happens with the pH?

    As it stands you have provided no information that would convince me that this is a good or smart thing to do to a cheap pair of shoes let alone footwear with price tags of thousands of dollars. As a matter of fact based on certain physical and chemical properties alone I would consider this as a suspect product to condition leather. Is it better than nothing? Well yeah but so is motor oil, lard, olive oil, and wheel bearing grease. Any oily/greasy substance will make the leather oh so pretty looking and soft. For today. What about tomorrow? Use any of the crap I just mentioned to condition leather and well good luck with tomorrow.

    Do you know what red rot is? I would suspect that in a long term situation food grade coconut oil would promote this condition instead of preventing it.
     
  20. misterjuiceman

    misterjuiceman Senior member

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    Maybe the third time will get an answer. How many people want to know the answer to this question? I don't think anyone cares about coconut oil anymore.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2014
    2 people like this.

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