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Wolverine 1000 Mile Boot Review

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Rollin Tumble, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. mg2380

    mg2380 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it's from the eyelets/speed hooks. Completely normal. Carry on.
     
  2. Neognosis

    Neognosis Senior member

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    Quote: The more "waterproof" your leather boots are, the less breathable they are.

    If you aren't going to need thorough waterproofing, and you are susceptible to sweaty or damp feet, you don't really want to compromise the breathability.
    Quote I hear this all the time.

    Yet nobody has ever shown me a shoe or leather jacket that has fallen apart due to rotting stitching or started to stink like rancid animal fat.

    So, for my money, these claims are just wind.

    I have a pair of black leather boots, made by some chinese company and marketed by Affliction, that lasted me five years and 50K miles of motorcycle riding, and they failed when I wore a hole through the vamp on the shift lever. The stitching never failed. And I treated them with neatsfoot oil every time they got wet, or every month or so. Same with my jacket. 50,000 miles of neatsfoot treatment, and no sign of stitching failing or the leather rotting.

    For whatever that's worth.... If anyone has some pictures of a rotting boot or stitching falling apart that they can attribute to use of neetsfeet oil, I am interested in learning about it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
  3. JoshH

    JoshH Member

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    Hello everyone,

    New to the boards here, but have been following this thread for months in preparation to buy some Wolverines. I ended up going with the Rockfords and just got them in today. They look and feel amazing, however there is one thing that concerns me. Are there any know knock-offs/fakes of this shoe or 1000 Miler's in general? The boots are perfect except for that the "Wolverine 1000 Mile" stamp on the upper right is darker then most in photos and a little uneven. Not horrible, but it does concern me in since there are so many knock-offs out there. This was an online purchase btw.

    Many thanks!
    Josh
     
  4. nevereast

    nevereast Senior member

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    Pics?
     
  5. JoshH

    JoshH Member

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  6. themonster

    themonster Well-Known Member

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    This is very true. I Sno-seal'd a pair of my beater boots and noticed a huge difference in breathability, especially during the summer. Aesthetically, it permanently changed the look of the leather.

    Personally, I won't use these on the 1k's.
     
  7. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    Above. Did you buy them from a Wolv dealer and did you pay a fair price for them? I guess I should also ask are they supposed to be firsts or seconds?



    Your comment about waterproof and breathability is correct. That's why I don't recommend anything with a bunch of pine tar in it. Snoseal and LP waterproof leather with beeswax which doesn't seal the pores in the leather.

    If you think neatsfoot oil and mink oil doesn't rot go talk to a guy who works with horse tack or makes/restores saddles. Pure neatsfoot won't do jack to stitching. Get a hold of something that's a blend instead of the real deal and you'll soon discover how well it dissolves some thread types and the glue that's used on leather as well. Mink oil these days isn't mink oil. It's a concoction of who knows what. This is why mink oil and neatsfoot oil are two things to generally steer clear from.
     
  8. accordion

    accordion Senior member

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    I went a cobbler near me who's well-reviewed and has 30 years of experience. He says the Obenauf wouldn't darken my brown Addisons much but would make them too shiny, and recommends using a spray instead. I actually wouldn't mind it if all the Obenauf does appearance-wise is make the boots shiny, otherwise I'll probably try the Meltonian Water & Stain Protector. Should I trust the cobbler?
     
  9. accordion

    accordion Senior member

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    So pure neatsfoot oil would be okay?
     
  10. quiicosa

    quiicosa New Member

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    This may be the dumbest question in the world but needs to be asked nonetheless: Are you supposed to wear the 1000 mile boot with the leather tab attached to the shoe laces? I am referring to the one that comes attached to one of the shoes. Obviously if it were made of plastic/paper I would throw it away, but I just want to make sure it's not there for a functional reason.
     
  11. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    I won't use it. It can rot and the last thing I need is add something else into the equation that could be a problem down the road. It's better than nothing but there's far better conditioners out there.



    LOL! No you don't keep it on. Use it for a key fob.
     
  12. hoodyear

    hoodyear Senior member

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    .
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
  13. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    Too shiny? That's a new one. LOL! A spray treatment? As in a silicone spray? silicon in and of itself won't hurt leather. It also does nothing for it other than make it a bit water resistant. If the spray is propelled by an aromatic hydrocarbon then find yourself a different cobbler.
     
  14. JoshH

    JoshH Member

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    They didn't say, it was from Amazon/FS Fashion.....extremely good price. They look and feel awesome, and the stamped part wont show anyway, I just hope they are the real thing. Seconds are fine with me if it's not obviously damaged anyway.

    Regards,
    Josh
     
  15. accordion

    accordion Senior member

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    final question before I apply Obenaufs, why two coatings? one is not enough?

    As for the shine, I think it's obvious Obenauf does make the leather shine differently aside from the color, but I suspect after months of wear the difference won't matter.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2013
  16. nevereast

    nevereast Senior member

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    I would bet the farm that they are real.

    No way those are fake
     
  17. Iipe

    Iipe Well-Known Member

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    Might be seconds, but they forgot to mention it. That happens.
     
  18. Neognosis

    Neognosis Senior member

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    Quote: How does it waterproof is it doesn't seal the pores?

    Quote: I actually have a horse. Well, my ex wife does, I just pay for it. HAHA.

    Anyway, we use pure neatsfoot oil on her tack. And have for years and years. And, like I said, I have used it on boots and my leather jacket for a long time.

    What I have noticed is that, like you said, it doesn't harm the stitching at all. And pure neatsfoot oil is very easy to find at any tack shop or countrymax store.

    One thing I HAVE Noticed though, is that there seems to be absolutely no detrimental effect to the leather as long as it is being used. I condition my riding jacket with neetsfoot oil and nothing bad happens all spring, summer, and fall. But in the winter, when the jacket is stored in my closet, it develops a thin white pasty, powdery layer in some spots. It easily wipes off with leather cleaner in the spring, and never appears again until the jacket has been back in storage for a month or so and not used. I am now curious as to whether or not this is from the neatsfoot oil, so this year before I put it away, instead of neetsfoot oil I used Lexol. I'll report on the results in a few weeks, if anyone is interested.
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    That's simple. All you do to create a hydrophobic barrier is find a compound that uses it's (water) surface tension and molecular cohesion against itself. Why does waxed cotton and Goretex breath while still being pretty much waterproof? Now you know.
     
  20. Neognosis

    Neognosis Senior member

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    Goretex breathes (SORT of) because it has holes in it that are larger than liquid water, but smaller than individual molecules of water vapor. I think this is sort of what you are saying.

    I don't own anything that is waxed cotton, but on other forums for hunting and shooting gear, those who do claim that isn't really waterproof anyway, it's just highly water resistant, and it also doesn't breathe very well, which is why there's a market for the more expensive goretex and eVent fabrics.

    Barbour calls their waxed cotton apparel "water repellent" and not "waterproof." The stuff that they label "waterproof" uses goretex or another brand of waterproof membrane. I suspect that there's a certain standard that must be met in order to call a fabric "waterproof" that probably does not apply to a fabric treatment.


    I'm under the impression that a wax creates a water resistance because water adheres weakly to the wax, but strongly to itself. So the surface tension of the water is stronger than osmotic forces that would otherwise pull the water in. I think this is what you are saying when you say
    Quote: I'm not really sure that even beeswax or whatever other hydrophobic compound you use would not also fill the natural pores in leather. I'm under the impression that it is a trade off... that unless you have a membrane with holes smaller than water droplets, yet larger than water vapor, you will always lose varying degrees of breatheability. Even with a membrane, IMO. Black Diamond uses a fabric in some of their camping tents that they say is made with a tight weave of nylon that has it's fibers impregnated with silicone, instead of just spraying a silicone solution on the nylon. The result is increased breathability, but it falls short of waterproof, as with enough time and pressure, water will leak in. I think this is analogous to putting a wax on a boot and then heating it up to liquify it. I don't think that pores in a dead animal skin open or close, since they don't open or close even in living skin. I think that when the wax is liquified, it penetrates the leather through an osmotic process. I suppose that heating any solid up does loosen the tension between individual molecules though, which makes a hot piece of iron easier to bend than a cold piece.


    It seems to me that leather itself is not very water permeable. I suspect that the holes in the stitching are the main source of ingress into the boot, and the way to stop that is to clog the holes in the boot where the stitching is.

    I'm open to learning more though, I'm not claiming any kind of expertise in this, just trying to remember high school chemistry and physics, and it just seems contrary to common sense to assume that a solid does not impede breathability to some extent when applied to another solid.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2013

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