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Why the sore feet in my dress shoes??

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by SoleFreak, Aug 15, 2016.

  1. SoleFreak

    SoleFreak Active Member

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    Hi Guys,

    So I ask the question, why are my feet always very sore after a days work in whatever dress shoe I wear? I currently rotate 2 pairs of Hugo Boss shoes (oxfords and derbys) and a pair of Cheaney oxfords with a Dainite sole. Also own a pair of Handgrade C&J's which I haven't worn yet.

    The Cheaneys are new and have been hurting the knuckle of my big toe on the left foot only but my main issue is with the soles of my feet (balls of my feet), this is were they are the most sore.

    What can be the cause of this as I know others who wear similar shoes and have no issues what so ever.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2016
  2. TOstyle

    TOstyle Senior member

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    Does take some time to work in new shoes, especially well-made shoes with stiffer, longer-lasting leather. Take some time at home to wear them just a few hours at a time to break them in, instead of just wearing them for a full work-day right away.

    Otherwise, it might be that they don't fit well. For some of mine, I've also had to have them widened as they were too narrow for the little toe. The leather should stretch and relax as you wear them, but if it's still an issue you can have a cobbler widen/stretch them.
     
  3. MonVert

    MonVert Member

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    As mentinend above. Fit is the most obvious issue... However, are you wearing decent socks with your shoes? (Someone has to ask this all important question.)
     
  4. starro

    starro Senior member

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    So of the 4 pairs of shoes you own, only 2 of them are considered quality dress shoes in this forum. The Cheaney is new, and C&J unworn, so possibly the foot pain arises from the well-worn, but lower quality shoes.

    food for thought
     
  5. Academic2

    Academic2 Senior member

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    May we assume from this that you don't get similarly sore from non-dress shoes?

    If so, and if you've ruled out all possible medical problems, and if the shoes fit properly, then you may just be spending a lot of time on your feet (I'm also assuming that the shoes have been broken in). If that's the case, a simple padded insole like Dr. Scholl's might solve the problem. I've added insoles to almost all my shoes.

    Cheers,

    Ac
     
  6. 12345Michael54321

    12345Michael54321 Senior member

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    True.

    Too many men buy the same size shoes now, as they did when last they had their feet measured, 20 years ago. I don't care if you stopped growing when you were 17; your feet may not have gotten the message.

    Feet can change. You need to get them measured every so often. For both length and width. Width is the big gotcha. Too many men don't even know what width their feet are; they just assume they're "average."

    Anyway, if only dress shoes leave your feet hurting, there are several possibilities. Maybe your non-dress shoes (sneakers? moccasins?) are more "giving" in terms of proper fit. Maybe your non-dress shoes have lots of cushioning, and your dress shoes don't. Maybe you wear nicely padded socks with your non-dress shoes, and they provide the extra cushioning. Maybe something else entirely.

    If you determine that the dress shoes fit right, and your feet don't start getting used to them before long, the Dr. Scholl's option, mentioned by Academic2, might have some merit. I prefer the gel insoles. Note: They may take up enough space inside the shoes as to make the shoes too tight. In which case you have a whole new set of options to explore in resolving that whole new problem.
     
  7. SoleFreak

    SoleFreak Active Member

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    So what are decent socks? I've considered insoles but that may make my issue worse as with the Cheaneys it's the left shoe that is giving me pain as its bending, the leather is pushing into the knuckle of my big toe. The other shoes are giving me sore soles due to the lack of cushion.

    My trainers are fine, apart from the ones that don't offer proper arch support.
     
  8. crinklecut

    crinklecut Senior member

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    Have you considered maybe seeing a podiatrist? It may be that you are prone to rolling your feet (pronation/supination), or have some other undiagnosed problem. Leather dress shoes are a lot less forgiving of these issues than trainers.
     
  9. MonVert

    MonVert Member

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    Really depends on what you find appropriate to wear with dress shoes. I, also, don't know just how much room there is between the top of your foot and the shoe itself. So anything more than a liner sock may make you unable to properly put on the shoe.

    Socks are the way to go, rather than "Gel inserts". Those can get nasty with leather shoes, if not taken care of.

    You might want to try looking through https://www.foxsox.com/catalog/shoponline.aspx and search for something that will fit the situation appropriately.

    The above posters also give good advice, too. :D So you should make sure everything else is okay before you buy socks.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2016
  10. SoleFreak

    SoleFreak Active Member

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    Yes have seen a podiatrist in the past who advised that I do some calf strengthening excercies which I found weird as I work out on the regular with resistance and that includes doing a complete workout on my legs!! Was also advised to buy dress shoes with a slightly thicker sole to provide more shock absorption (was wearing my Hugo boss shoes at the time). It's a shame none of these proper shoe brands offer a line of shoe that incorporates a more cushioned insole something similar to what you find in Clarks shoes for those that know about them.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2016
  11. GBR

    GBR Senior member

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    Poor fit, did you buy them in a bricks and mortar shop or simply take a punt getting the right shoes on line?
     
  12. SoleFreak

    SoleFreak Active Member

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    Nah the Cheaneys are a good fit bar the left shoe digging into my top knuckle. And yes they were bought at a Cheaney store here in the UK.
     
  13. New Shoes1

    New Shoes1 Senior member

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    Really? Because there are two usual causes for what you described: (i) you have not yet broken the shoe in; or (ii) the shoe is too long for you, which is why it is flexing/bending so significantly at your toes. It may fit width wise, but is the ball of your foot where it should be (at the widest part of the shoe)?
     
  14. SoleFreak

    SoleFreak Active Member

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    If the shoes were too long then surely I'd be experiencing the issue on both feet? But I'm not, its just the left shoe. However, it could be that they are not broken in, today was the 3rd wear. Was told by the salesman that I should give it 6 wears before bringing them back in for the shoe to be stretched so will see how I get on.
     
  15. starro

    starro Senior member

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    Did you get both feet measured? Are they the same size? Typically people's left and right feet do not match, but with RTW shoes we have little choice but buy the size of the larger foot.
     
  16. SoleFreak

    SoleFreak Active Member

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    That I did not do but was told by the salesman that there is good chance my left foot would be bigger than the right hence why the pain... Wasn't sure if that was sales talk! The Cheaneys are a size 7, my C&J's are a 6.5, both fit well but the soles of my feet are still sore from walking around in the Cheaneys and my Boss shoes.
     
  17. starro

    starro Senior member

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    If you could be more specific about the type of discomfort, and where exactly you get it, then I think some of the experienced members here can help you out.
     
  18. SoleFreak

    SoleFreak Active Member

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    I'd say the ball of my feet is where they're most painful but also feel pain around the toes too which is kinda close to the ball region.
     
  19. starro

    starro Senior member

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    I personally don't experience this specific problem, so unfortunately I can't feel your pain. Maybe someone qualified can comment?

    All I can do is regurgitate the importance of fitting the shoe to the ball, rather than the toes. If it's both the ball and toes hurting, then it could be a case of the shoe's widest part not aligning with your foot's widest. Then again, it could just be a case of cheap, thin insoles. Higher quality shoes tend to use thikcer insoles made of real leather. Real, quality insole leather molds to the shape of your feet over time, which will not happen in cheaper shoes.
     
  20. 12345Michael54321

    12345Michael54321 Senior member

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    Not surely at all.

    Most people have one foot larger than the other. Sometimes the left is the larger. Sometimes the right.

    Even aside from overall size, the two feet needn't be mirror images of each other. They can vary dimensionally in all sorts of ways.

    And not only do feet tend to expand over the course of the day (which means your feet can measure larger if they're measured in late afternoon, than if they're measured in the morning), but one of your feet may expand more than the other - or in different ways than the other - during the course of the day.

    Now, I'm not telling you that if your right foot measure 9D at 10am, that it'll be a 13EEE at dinnertime. Nor that your left foot will be a 6.5AA. But a half size or slightly more variance, one letter grade in width, a fraction of an inch in some other way, etc., are all entirely plausible and really quite commonplace. And such seemingly minor differences can spell the difference between a comfortable shoe, and foot pain.

    And, of course, some shoes just don't match up well with some feet. Same way that no matter what size a suit is, it may simply not be a good fit for one's overall physique.

    Various types of casual footwear may let one get away with a mediocre fit, with no great problem. Dress shoes tend to be more critical this way. It's sort of how you might be able to wear a sweat shirt that's not a great fit for you, but when it comes to a dress shirt, proper fit is more critical if you want to be comfortable.
     

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