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Why tailors on the row love so much heavier fabrics?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by lasbar, Mar 27, 2011.

  1. lasbar

    lasbar Senior member

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    It is nice a nice conversation without pics , insuts and snark...

    It is actually quite strange to see Cifoneli being quite happy and excited to work on a 11 oz fabric when the Rowers are pushing the heavier ones..

    It is a 3 piece suit and I live in the south-east of England where the temperatures are usualy mildish..

    I don't really want to bake in my suit even if it is easier for them to work with..

    I woudn't go lower but 330 grms is a good weight..

    I also want a fabric with a finish reducing the shine effect after a few wears.

    The Premier cru looks nice ...Super 100 with a bit of cashmere to give some body to it.
     


  2. RSS

    RSS Senior member

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    I would relish hearing anything about Richard Anderson compared with his former house. Especially as I am considering the former for my return to the Row.
    I was with Huntsman when Richard & Brian (Lishak) left. As soon as they were in business for themselves ... I began to use them. I did go back to Huntsman for a house tweed ... but I don't regret leaving to go with Richard for the rest of my tailored pieces.

    I suggest that you visit London and interview them both. See which firm makes the right coat for you.
     


  3. Kuro

    Kuro Senior member

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    I also want a fabric with a finish reducing the shine effect after a few wears.

    The Premier cru looks nice ...Super 100 with a bit of cashmere to give some body to it.


    agree. the finish on the premier cru is very nice. the blue riband is a little drier (i think that is the term), but certainly not as dry as lesser's fabrics. i beleive the blue riband is super 100s also, so perhaps it is the cashmere that is the difference?
     


  4. lasbar

    lasbar Senior member

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    I was with Huntsman when Richard & Brian (Lishak) left. As soon as they were in business for themselves ... I began to use them. I did go back to Huntsman for a house tweed ... but I don't regret leaving to go with Richard for the rest of my tailored pieces.

    I suggest that you visit London and interview them both. See which firm makes the right coat for you.


    I have always been nicely received by Brian Lishak when I went next door...

    I remember Johnny Allen telling me "Richard is one of us"...

    Great endorsement from a former colleague.
     


  5. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I have heard mixed reports from Manton on the Premier cru book. It is going to be a 3 piece suit and I don't want to finish sweating like a pig everywhere i go... The Schofield is lovely too. The Fox looks a bit too fragile but I love the dark blue worsted 11oz. I'm looking for a dark blue and not a navy...
    There are several cloths I like that Manton doesn't like. We probably have different reasons for our likes and dislikes. If Huntsman says heavier is better but it is not right for your needs, go with your decision as they only get to sew it, you get to wear it.
     


  6. lasbar

    lasbar Senior member

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    There are several cloths I like that Manton doesn't like. We probably have different reasons for our likes and dislikes. If Huntsman says heavier is better but it is not right for your needs, go with your decision as they only get to sew it, you get to wear it.

    What do you think of the Premier cru?

    Is the cashmere input a good think or not ?
     


  7. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    It tailors up well. I didn't think it was too heavy.
    The cashmere gives it a softer hand. Book has great patterns to choose from.
     


  8. lasbar

    lasbar Senior member

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    The Schofield has also a very textured finish...

    Very nice too...
     


  9. Geezer

    Geezer Senior member

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    I was with Huntsman when Richard & Brian (Lishak) left. As soon as they were in business for themselves ... I began to use them. I did go back to Huntsman for a house tweed ... but I don't regret leaving to go with Richard for the rest of my tailored pieces.

    I suggest that you visit London and interview them both. See which firm makes the right coat for you.


    Thanks. I live in London. I've been through a variety of soft, medium, and harder cut tailors of varying quality and cost - and seen the work of others. And don't regret the experience (even if the odd result has been disappointing). Currently, I am attracted to a harder cut. And I have always had a thing for the more extreme cuts, or the more Cavalry-esque details (I haven't had a SB made without hacking pockets and very long double vents in 20 years, for example, even if Famous Soft Tailor never flared the skirt).

    My big reservations on HH have always been two: why are they so bloody expensive and, post-Lishak, can they cut? My small reservations on Richard much less (loved the book). But he's a bit of a charmer and gets on TV and in the papers a lot. If that was my criterion, I might as well have Boateng "make" me a purple suit that doesn't fit.

    Views?
     


  10. RSS

    RSS Senior member

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    My big reservations on HH have always been two: why are they so bloody expensive and, post-Lishak, can they cut? My small reservations on Richard much less (loved the book). But he's a bit of a charmer and gets on TV and in the papers a lot. If that was my criterion, I might as well have Boateng "make" me a purple suit that doesn't fit.
    Perhaps because Richard can make you a suit that will fit. Just because both get publicity doesn't mean they are similarly talented.

    Surely your comment wasn't serious. I would hope that publicity is not your criterion when choosing a tailor. Your criterior should be the tailor's abilities.

    But not to worry ... Richard won't talk about you on TV. And unless you make a habit of telling people the name of your tailor ... few will really know that what you are wearing is by the tailor that was just interviewed by the BBC.
     


  11. S. Magnozzi

    S. Magnozzi Senior member

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    It is nice a nice conversation without pics , insuts and snark...

    It is actually quite strange to see Cifoneli being quite happy and excited to work on a 11 oz fabric when the Rowers are pushing the heavier ones..

    It is a 3 piece suit and I live in the south-east of England where the temperatures are usualy mildish..

    I don't really want to bake in my suit even if it is easier for them to work with..

    I woudn't go lower but 330 grms is a good weight..

    I also want a fabric with a finish reducing the shine effect after a few wears.

    The Premier cru looks nice ...Super 100 with a bit of cashmere to give some body to it.


    Would this be a 'summer season' suit? Surely, then a 11 oz flannel makes sense, even though I find them a bit flimsy. If not, perhaps you should take a look at H. Lesser's flannel book-I bet Huntsman would love that.
     


  12. pvrhye

    pvrhye Senior member

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    Could also be product differentiation against the Italians.
     


  13. lasbar

    lasbar Senior member

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    Could also be product differentiation against the Italians.

    Continental tailors love working on lighter fabrics..

    It could be also in their DNA because of the obvious temperature differences..

    Savile Row has heavier fabrics in their DNA for obvious reasons when buildings were very cold in the winter...

    With over-heated offices, a 14 oz suit requires you having the body temperature of a snake.
     


  14. Nicola

    Nicola Senior member

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    It's not like Italians are known for keeping homes warm during the winter. Yes Sicily is warmer then Norway but much of Italy doesn't get much above 10C from say Nov to April .

    Italians also tend to think it's cold when it's not. I'm not surprised to see the locals in an overcoat with the temps above 20C.
     


  15. S. Magnozzi

    S. Magnozzi Senior member

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    Continental tailors love working on lighter fabrics..

    It could be also in their DNA because of the obvious temperature differences..

    Savile Row has heavier fabrics in their DNA for obvious reasons when buildings were very cold in the winter...

    With over-heated offices, a 14 oz suit requires you having the body temperature of a snake.


    I'm not so sure, many Italian tailors prefer and love English fabrics...
     


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