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Why do people hate genetically modified food?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by onix, Mar 29, 2013.

  1. otc

    otc Senior member

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    For the record, I dislike monsanto more for their legal practices than the fact that they are using science on food.

    Going after farmers for doing completely normal things like reserving some of their harvest to replant instead of buying more seeds is bull shit. That's what farmers do and if you didn't want to deal with the fact that most seeds grow to produce more seeds...maybe you shouldn't have gotten into the seed-selling business. Ditto for suing farmers who never bought monsanto seeds but end up with roundup-ready crops after enough cross pollination with their neighbors who did buy monsanto.

    Also, the Bee thing is scary.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2013
  2. constant struggle

    constant struggle Senior member

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    I don't like GM food because i still have taste buds, also i am not really into massive amounts of chemicals sprayed on my food (as harmless as they claim to be). Monsanto is the anti small farmer. Also, if you want to eat cheap mass produced chemically sprayed, GMO food, go ahead, but... THIS IS STYLEFORVM! Plebian!
     
  3. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    OK, I'll rise to the bait. There is no correlation between GMOs and increased use of pesticides, herbicides or fungicides. In fact, GMOs can reduce the amounts used because they allow more efficient and targeted spraying. Furthermore, reducing the frequency of spraying reduces the amount of tractor time in fields, which reduces compaction of soil and soil erosion and exhaust pollution as well (if you've ever visited the Central Valley during winter, this is not an inconsiderable benefit). As for flavorless ... for the most part, the only GMO fruit or vegetable you are likely to have tasted is Hawaiian papaya. There was a Flavr-Savr tomato introduced years ago, but it was a commercial flop and hasn't been in production for at least a decade.
    The papaya is actually an interesting case. At one point several years ago the Hawaiian papaya industry (IIRC, the main US source of commercial papayas) was threatened with extinction because of an introduced pest for which the conventional crop had no defense. By using genetic engineering, scientists were able to create a papaya that could survive the pest.
    This is a particularly interesting case today because there is an introduced pest which is threatening all of US citrus production. HLB has already devastated Florida and Brazil and has been found in isolated California orchards. As of now, there is no defense for it, though pesticide spraying can help some by killing the bugs that spread it. If HLB spreads in California, it could mean within a very short time the end of most oranges, lemons, limes and mandarins grown in this country (there is still a fairly sizable grapefruit crop grown in Texas, where winters get cold enough to reduce the insect population).
    I am not rabidly pro-GMO, but I think it's important to recognize that the technique's use does not stop with Monsanto corporation.
     
    5 people like this.
  4. FLMountainMan

    FLMountainMan Senior member

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    Only in a country that has GMO food can people afford to argue about whether they should eat it or not.
     
  5. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'd go further and say that it is terribly silly to be rabidly pro or anti GMO, which is a group of technologies, real and possible. If you find yourself hating something like that, it is worth questioning exactly from where you are coming. Concentrate on the uses and abuses, not on some prelapsarian golden age when all vegetables were heirlooms and a small number of people could have enough of them to survive. children frolicked in fields of fraises des bois.
     
  6. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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  7. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    you could replace GMO with almost any issue. problem is these days people only seem to be able to find identity in extreme positions. Yes/no on/off for/against evil/blessed
     
  8. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    Which reminds me of this

    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]

    and I'm also scared that if I consume a Monsanto product that they'll have a patent on me and any of my work product. I might also become resistant to Roundup which ...probably isn't an issue.
     
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  9. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    but then what would you do for deodorant?
     
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  10. FLMountainMan

    FLMountainMan Senior member

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    Man, I love the South. :laugh: The way that guy says "fat boy" cracks me up every time.
     
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  11. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    line my pits with aluminum foil, I guess.
     
  12. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Not so if this study from Washington State is true.

    Then you have Penn State saying a year or so ago regarding the planned escalation to stronger pest and herbicides to combat resistance that "new products are "likely to increase the severity of resistant weeds." As proven alread in Nebraska: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120816151812.htm When the farmers see their chemical-infused seeds NOT resisting bugs and weeds... they'll dump more chemicals on them. They already do.

    Again- I'm not rabid anti-anything regarding feeding our planet, but we will never win this nuclear escalation against weed/insect resistance. Mother Nature always has the last say.


    PS- as to GMO's having failed to market the benefit- I'd counter that they have no benefit to offer that is of interest to a SIGNIFICANT percentage of consumers. As Kimbrell wrote a few years ago, "Genetically modified foods do nothing for the "eating public". They provide no extra nutrition, flavor, safety or any other trait that people actually want."
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2013
  13. Gibonius

    Gibonius Senior member

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    People want cheap food, which is what a lot of this comes down to.
     
  14. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    as matt pointed out, that is not an inconsiderable benefit.
    again, though, it's complicated (that ought to be my middle name). because the vast majority (almost all) of the gmo crops grown in the us are, arguably, things we shouldn't be eating more of anyway -- corn, soy and wheat.
     
  15. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Ding ding ding...
     
  16. onix

    onix Senior member

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    Below.

     
  17. suited

    suited Senior member

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    Movements to:

    1) require establishments to list caloric content
    2) more stringent labeling requirements on supermarket products
    3) ban trans fats

    The health of the vast majority would be greatly improved if they picked healthier foods from the current selection, without any modification to labeling or the removal of ingredients, (the vast majority is eating a lot of processed food and fast food) and exercised on a regular basis. I sincerely wonder how much of this is a subconscious attempt to alleviate responsibility from the individual and pretend that outside forces are somehow preventing them from leading a healthier lifestyle.
     
    1 person likes this.
  18. hendrix

    hendrix Senior member

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    What's wrong with eating corn, soy or wheat?
     
  19. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    there's absolutely nothing wrong with eating corn, soy or wheat. it's a matter of how much of it we eat and how much of it we eat without knowing it in processed foods. and, to start another debate, how much of that is underwritten by the government, keeping the prices of processed and fast foods artificially low.
     
    2 people like this.

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