Who's paying for Bruce Boyer

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by dopey, Mar 4, 2009.

  1. Film Noir Buff

    Film Noir Buff Senior member

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    I love George Frazier (both), but here is one of my favorite quotations from the journalist Frazier, this one covering both music and style: "Frank Sinatra looks like nothing so much as he looks like a Frank Sinatra fan. He favors big knots when he wears four-in-hand ties, and the collars on his shirts are either very short (like Cary Grant's) or very long (like George Raft's.)" Frazier's editors at Downbeat, for which he wrote immediately after college, had a nickname for him: Acidmouth. - B
    He was the living duende[​IMG]
     


  2. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Boyer himself is a example of the passing of that age, since he is a severely diminutized version of George Frazier. "It feels like snow, he said, and it was all there, all the sadness and all the silveryness in a single sentence." - B
    I don't think this is really a fair comparison. Not to Boyer, but to Frazier. Frazier was a serious journalist, insightful critic AND a good writer. His range was broad . That his articles on dress remain iconic is a testament to how good he was more than to how hard he covered the beat. Well that isn't fair either. Boyer chose to write in a different field and in a different way, and I think he does a fine job. But he is much less than a diminutized Frazier. And foo on you - I feel bad writing that. He is still a great writer, and I would gladly buy his next book if it was on a subject I in which I was interested. It is just that Frazier was one of the greats.
     


  3. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Boyer is a Lit professor who got into writing about clothes as a sidelight in the '70s when he wrote a piece after the d of Windsor died about his effect on style. It's not like he has no interests or knowledge base beyond clothing.
     


  4. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Boyer is a Lit professor who got into writing about clothes as a sidelight in the '70s when he wrote a piece after the d of Windsor died about his effect on style. It's not like he has no interests or knowledge base beyond clothing.
    He may know all sorts of things, but he only publishes on one. Why doesn't he write about anything else? In fairness, his insights on how clothing influences or reflects changes in culture are what makes some of his pieces the most interesting. For example, his comments on how Astaire's style and clothes stood in for the dawning of the American Age (and a particular kind of America) were my favorite part of Astaire Style. I am not sure I agreed, but it was really good to think about. I hope I don't come off as a Boyer basher. I do like his stuff.
     


  5. Baron

    Baron Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    George Frazier the boxer would be preoccupied with not coming up with the whole double-sided grill thing. This still eats at his craw.

    - B


    Joe Frazier the boxer was the undefeated heavyweight champion of the world when he was knocked senseless in a stunning upset by up and coming sensation George Foreman, later of grill fame. "Down goes Frazier! Down goes Frazier!"
     


  6. Film Noir Buff

    Film Noir Buff Senior member

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    He may know all sorts of things, but he only publishes on one. Why doesn't he write about anything else? In fairness, his insights on how clothing influences or reflects changes in culture are what makes some of his pieces the most interesting. For example, his comments on how Astaire's style and clothes stood in for the dawning of the American Age (and a particular kind of America) were my favorite part of Astaire Style. I am not sure I agreed, but it was really good to think about. I hope I don't come off as a Boyer basher. I do like his stuff.
    One can only ponder what he makes of your writings on style.[​IMG]
     


  7. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    Joe Frazier the boxer was the undefeated heavyweight champion of the world when he was knocked senseless in a stunning upset by up and coming sensation George Foreman, later of grill fame. "Down goes Frazier! Down goes Frazier!"

    Do you see your role as explaining jokes to everyone?


    - B
     


  8. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    One can only ponder what he makes of your writings on style.[​IMG]
    He doesn't think I should be paid, that's for sure. How come you never interviewed him for your site? I bet he wouldn't have charged you. You could have done a roundtable with David Wilder.
     


  9. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    I don't think this is really a fair comparison. Not to Boyer, but to Frazier. Frazier was a serious journalist, insightful critic AND a good writer. His range was broad . That his articles on dress remain iconic is a testament to how good he was more than to how hard he covered the beat.

    Well that isn't fair either. Boyer chose to write in a different field and in a different way, and I think he does a fine job. But he is much less than a diminutized Frazier. And foo on you - I feel bad writing that. He is still a great writer, and I would gladly buy his next book if it was on a subject I in which I was interested. It is just that Frazier was one of the greats.


    I have you bobbing and weaving, much like Ali did with Rope-a-Dope with George Frazier.


    - B
     


  10. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    Boyer is a Lit professor who got into writing about clothes as a sidelight in the '70s when he wrote a piece after the d of Windsor died about his effect on style. It's not like he has no interests or knowledge base beyond clothing.

    Boyer is not a SIS?


    - B
     


  11. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Boyer is not a SIS?


    - B


    Sartorial Idiot Savant

    Baron
     


  12. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Boyer is not a SIS?


    - B


    Senior Intelligence Service?
     


  13. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    From TIME Magazine

    Gentleman George

    Monday, Feb. 25, 1974

    When the Greater Boston Feminist Fair voted Boston Globe Columnist George Frazier "Worst Male Chauvinist Pig" for his comments on the women's movement and awarded him a muzzle, he had it bronzed and placed over his fireplace. After he made the White House "enemies list," having labeled Richard Nixon "a louse" and David Eisenhower "the creepy kid," Frazier observed the occasion typically. He donned a starched dickey shirt, planted a carnation in the buttonhole of his 30-year-old Brooks Brothers suit, and sauntered over to Locke-Ober's CafÃ[​IMG] for his favorite finnan haddie dinner. He was aspishly relieved that a local boy should have won such notice: "My God, what if I hadn't made the list? Men have been known to take the gas pipe with less provocation."

    Frazier need not have worried. Gentleman George is not only an ornamental Boston legend but a social commentator whose tart views reach an audience far beyond Boston. Besides writing four columns a week for the Globe, he discourses once a week on the CBS Morning News show and again on a local Boston TV program. At 62 he is one of the oldest writers to get an assignment from Rolling Stone. Most journalists his age have the years gentle their pace or prejudices. Frazier is as eager as ever to flay those he thinks pompous.

    His targets are so inclusive"”nearly all politicians and women's rights advocates, many fellow journalists and people who wear white socks"”that he is doubtless on many enemies lists. Unlike most press scolds, who tend to ignore social trivia for headier political game, Frazier has anchored his reputation by roasting the large and the small with equal flair. He regularly assaults national institutions like Howard Cosell ("commits a public disturbance every time he opens his mouth"). But he also stalks such Main Street game as deer hunters ("revolting humanoids") and people who call up radio talk shows ("idiots who elude their keepers long enough to get to a phone").

    Most of the columns are written in stream-of-consciousness style that leaps from notion to notion with scant regard for structure or logic, neither of which is a Frazier forte. Rather, his strength is an unerring eye for targets vulnerable to his wit, delivered in the bilious tones of an aggrieved headmaster. Once in a while he softens with memories of the good old days. He can sentimentalize at length about bar-hopping with Hemingway and Thurber, and pay tribute to Tim Costello, the late keeper of a Manhattan literary saloon, this way: "Without himself, who has been in the ground and as one with the heather on the heath these many unstylish years, Tim's was never again as it was when he was there softly singing John Anderson, My Jo or discussing the Dublin of Joyce."

    Frazier wastes no sympathy on what he might call the Great Sartorially Unwashed: those who wear double-knit suits off the rack and monograms, which he regards as "manifestations of insecurity." He devoted an entire column recently to upbraiding a Los Angeles physician who had tried to crash Boston's proper Ritz bar in a Cardin turtleneck. A city councilor, Albert ("Dapper") O'Neil, has filed suit against him for $1 million because of Frazier's gibes at the crease in O'Neil's trousers.

    Such hauteur may not become the son of a West Roxbury, Mass., fire inspector.

    But Frazier, who went on from his lace-curtain upbringing to acquire a Harvard degree and Brahmin persona, views himself as a romantic in mourning for his era's lost grace and style. The common man (H.L. Mencken's Boobus americanus) is to Frazier the root of the new Philistinism"”"ignorant, ill-clad, ill-spoken."

    Frazier's acid snobbery occasionally backfires. He angered early employers at such papers as Boston's Record American ("The readers all moved their lips when they read, but then so did the editors"). His views do not exactly coincide with those of the liberal Globe either. In 1971, after Frazier savaged the TV performance of five earnest young Boston reporters, attacking them mainly for looking tacky on camera, Editor Tom Winship sacked him. Frazier promptly hired a small plane to fly over a jammed local football stadium trailing a banner: BRING BACK GEORGE FRAZIER. He was soon rehired.

    Despite Frazier's outrageous excesses, he is an original whose following keeps coming back for more. "The whole trouble with this era," muses Frazier, "is that there is very little eccentricity. An age is great in art and every other way in proportion to the eccentrics who thrive in that time." What other eccentric would confound his readers by observing the Red Sox's winning baseball opener in Latin?
     


  14. Baron

    Baron Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Do you see your role as explaining jokes to everyone?


    - B


    It's hard, keeping up with the various levels of irony around here.
     


  15. Film Noir Buff

    Film Noir Buff Senior member

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    He doesn't think I should be paid, that's for sure. How come you never interviewed him for your site? I bet he wouldn't have charged you. You could have done a roundtable with David Wilder.
    Did he say he charged for that interview you linked? I considered it, someone we mutually know wanted me too but I went in the direction of the English look. I didn't realize how much work that would be when I started out. Now that the main series is ending, I might return to some American topics.
     


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