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Who needs HDTV Set and why?

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Pezzaturra, Sep 8, 2009.

  1. oneeightyseven

    oneeightyseven Senior member

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    did not read, but I luvz my HDTVs.
     
  2. ZackyBoy

    ZackyBoy Senior member

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    Much of my library is still in VHS format. Going to a HD television would be a step in the wrong direction as far as picture quality goes. I have no reason to get a television with a higher resolution to make all my old media look even worse. IMO this is just a racket. Seems like people JUST replaced all their VHS with DVD, and now you have to start replacing your DVDs with Blueray at around 40 bucks a pop. I don't think so. My next media player isn't going to be Blueray, it's going to be a streamer like a WDTV or Popcorn Hour.
    Blurays are about $15-20 a pop, and it's not at all a racket. HD picture and HD sound are very viable. In fact 99% of the bluray nay-sayers and haters are the ones who haven't even experienced or owned any of the technology themselves. People replaced their VHS with DVD upwards of 10 years ago, friendo. Should each technology have a 50 year lifespan?
     
  3. javyn

    javyn Senior member

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    Blurays are about $15-20 a pop, and it's not at all a racket. HD picture and HD sound are very viable. In fact 99% of the bluray nay-sayers and haters are the ones who haven't even experienced or owned any of the technology themselves. People replaced their VHS with DVD upwards of 10 years ago, friendo. Should each technology have a 50 year lifespan?

    Not saying it should or shouldn't, I'm just saying I'm not buying. Never seen Blueray, but have seen HD. Looks nicer, not trying to argue that. I'm arguing it's not nice enough to justify having to replace my entire library for it.
     
  4. oneeightyseven

    oneeightyseven Senior member

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    Not saying it should or shouldn't, I'm just saying I'm not buying. Never seen Blueray, but have seen HD. Looks nicer, not trying to argue that. I'm arguing it's not nice enough to justify having to replace my entire library for it.

    you don't have to replace your entire library. If you have DVDs, I'm sure you can still play them on a Blu Ray player. If not, just keep your DVD player hooked up to your new tv. All that is required is that you purchase an HDTV.
     
  5. Pezzaturra

    Pezzaturra Senior member

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    I personally need HDTV...BluRay is a noticeable improvement over DVD and my 1080P set looks terrific. Even upconverted DVDs look terrific.

    dvd is 480p and looks the best on 480p TV set.
     
  6. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    dvd is 480p and looks the best on 480p TV set.

    DVD is 480i.

    --Andre
     
  7. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    I love my 1080p when a good BluRay is on. If you want to see some jaw dropping scenery, check out "Mongol," (story line is a bit shallow). The Dark Knight is pretty good for effects and The Watchmen was pretty incredible.
     
  8. Pezzaturra

    Pezzaturra Senior member

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    DVD is 480i.

    --Andre


    Yes you are right. It is dvd player that bumps it to 480p. So in that light why the hell we are buying 1080p Blue Ray players? If inverse telecine is working then we only need 1080i .

    Do they shoot TV programs nowadays with 1080i/1080p cameras?

    Are movies still shot on film have almost unlimited resolution? (The film-grain being much smaller than any pixel currently.)
     
  9. turboman808

    turboman808 Senior member

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    Isn't the whole HDTV bonanza nothing but marketing ploy to make people upgrade their TV sets? Or in other words spend their money...

    I have read that cable companies stream every HD signal compressed. So I plugged the antenna into my TV's tuner and i was blown away by how sharper and 3-d the picture looked. Then I read a bit about broadcast HD and learned that the highest quality is only 1080i...

    So there is no cable or broadcast signal that provides 1080p resolution thus 1080p TVs are useless, unless you play Blue Ray dvds .

    Then I went back and looked again at my FIOS cable, man was it lacking compared to free air broadcast channels.

    Where is FCC when you need them to protect consumers from false claims?

    End of rant.




    I need it.

    Whats funny is you are talking about Cable and OTA broadcast. Haven't done over the air in 15 years and dropped cable 2 years ago. To those who do maybe they don't need HDTV.


    I have terrabytes of TV shows on my network. I have literally thousands of movies and even more tv shows in a stack of drive about the size of 10 VHS tapes.

    All accessed by my popcorn hour(s) that are about the size of a single vhs tape.

    I don't have tapes, cd, dvds, or the players for all these things junking up my house. With flat screens on the wall it makes the place super clean and nothing is intrusive in any way. The technology makes my place more of a home if you ask me. But thats just my opinion.
     
  10. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Senior member

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    dvd is 480p and looks the best on 480p TV set.

    This is entirely subjective at best and just plain not true at worst.
    Not only do most HDTV's and current DVD players upconvert pretty well, but they are much better suited to play movies in their native widescreen format than most older tv's. Maybe you think that a 32inch letterboxed to 24 inch picture looks better than a full screen (or nearly full screen) upscaled dvd, but I know a lot of people who would disagree with you.


    If you are one of those people who bought 4:3 ratio DVD's then I assure you, you don't care about picture quality anyways, and have nothing to complain about.
     
  11. turboman808

    turboman808 Senior member

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    For the record I doubt anyone can really tell the difference between 1080i and 1080p. My set upconverts to 1080p anyways.
     
  12. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    For the record I doubt anyone can really tell the difference between 1080i and 1080p. My set upconverts to 1080p anyways.

    I would agree, probably reaching the limits of the eye to discern.
     
  13. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    So in that light why the hell we are buying 1080p Blue Ray players? If inverse telecine is working then we only need 1080i .

    You'll have to ask the BD committee about that. But we get BD players because they are the highest quality HD source that's available to consumers. Also, not all TV sets or BD players do inverse telecine correctly.

    It depends. Many HD video cameras are still 1080i, but things are changing. 1080p 30fps isn't uncommon anymore.

    Film doesn't have unlimited resolution, but yes many movies are still shot in film, though that's also changing. For example, Sony built George Lucas a bunch of custom 24 fps progressive digital video cameras for Episode II. Episode I was shot on film, and then digitally scanned for the special effects people to work on them. The scanning process took so much time and effort that he decided to shoot digitally to avoid the scanning.

    --Andre
     
  14. turboman808

    turboman808 Senior member

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    Most of your reality shows that are shot outside and in dangerous and dirty areas are shot using sony cameras at 1440i. Dirty Jobs, Ice Road Truckers, West Coast Choppers etc...

    Any reality show shot in say a house like Big Brothers that has a control room would use Canon 1080p cameras with smpte lock. Same with live shows like the Tonight Show. Basiacally anything that would have a control room.


    Top Gear uses a bit of everything. They use high end cameras in the studio and on the set. But they also use lower end sony cameras in areas where they can get damaged or destroyed. I've even seen them use the lowest of quality consumer cameras in a few cases.


    Most of this stuff would ultimately be up converted to 1080p. It just makes it easier for editing.



    All of our stuff is shot at 1440i and up converted to 1080p for final editing. For VOD clients I am asked for many sizes and resolutions. Itunes, Ipod, TV(Comcast doesn't ask for the same resolution as Cabelvision), Online, they all want different formats in the end.
     
  15. ohm

    ohm Senior member

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    The answer to your question is planet earth in blu ray.
     
  16. Davidko19

    Davidko19 Senior member

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    I can see the difference between regular tv and HD, though its hardly a deal breaker for me.

    I cannnot tell the difference between DVD and blu-ray. DVD vs VHS, light years. DVD vs BR - microscopic.

    I think technology is about maxed out for what your eyes/ears can sense on a 2D plane. I mean, how much more revolutionary can it get? Am I wrong for thinking that we have maxed out on quality?
     
  17. grundletaint

    grundletaint Senior member

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    the sound of blu-ray is what finally converted me. i can't really tell a huge difference in the picture vs. DVD. THE SOUND, BABY.
     
  18. GiltEdge

    GiltEdge Senior member

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    Cablevison ftw! Not going to lie, expensive but worth it. iO Triple Play
     
  19. Davidko19

    Davidko19 Senior member

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    still, a fart sounds like a fart on DVD or Blu-Ray. I cant imagine it being that much more of a mind blowing experience. Seems like a high price to pay for such a miniscule reward, unlike the analog tv/vhs vs HD/DVD jump.
     
  20. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Senior member

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    still, a fart sounds like a fart on DVD or Blu-Ray. I cant imagine it being that much more of a mind blowing experience. Seems like a high price to pay for such a miniscule reward, unlike the analog tv/vhs vs HD/DVD jump.

    Depends on your sound system.
     

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