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White collar/cuffs on colored shirts

zjpj83

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Please, looking forward to your responses. I like the look of a white collar with striped shirts very much but have heard some opposition here to that look. If you are opposed, why? If not, why?

Tell all. Thanks.
 

Doctor Crane

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There's something about contrasting white collars and white French cuffs that I love. Sure, it's got a TV newscaster a la Tom Brokow/80s power broker look to it but so what? I find myself particularly fond of Ralph Lauren Purple Label's Keaton collared shirts in this style. I suppose the whole thing is pretty dandyish but if you can pull it off successfully, more power to you.
 

zjpj83

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There's something about contrasting white collars and white French cuffs that I love. Sure, it's got a TV newscaster a la Tom Brokow/80s power broker look to it but so what? I find myself particularly fond of Ralph Lauren Purple Label's Keaton collared shirts in this style. I suppose the whole thing is pretty dandyish but if you can pull it off successfully, more power to you.
I agree.
 

alchimiste

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I don't like white collar/cuffs on color/stripe shirts. No reason for that, just not my stuff. It cannot be completely wrong though, as it seems to be widespread in the UK.
 

ernest

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I like BUT only on striped shirts
 

Doctor Crane

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The funny thing was I was just glancing over Purple Label's new spring collection today on their site and was admiring that same picture. Love the shirt/tie combos they have up there now. Only problem I have is I can't justify paying over 200 dollars for a shirt just yet. Maybe one of those ties though...
 

alaaro

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I personally think it looks ridiculous.
 

Tyto

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I like contrast collars and cuffs, though I only own one such shirt.

Part of the problem is that even when I wear a suit (which is usually for client meetings or public hearings), I'm already pushing it a little bit (my field tends strongly toward business casual), and for political reasons, I've actually made clothing choices based on the desire not to look like an attorney or a developer, who I see wearing them often.

Also, I've always associated contrast collars and cuffs with more formality, and adding a contrast collar shirt to a work ensemble seems a little too much, little too Gordon Gekko for my usual dealings.

When I'm hitting the town, though....
 

j

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I want to hate them, for the same reason I hate leather patches on the elbows of brand new tweed jackets and fake whiskers on jeans, but I can't; they look too good. It's a conflict of morals that could destroy someone unable to hold two conflicting viewpoints comfortably.
 

zjpj83

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does it hearken back to the days of detachable collars? Is that the origin? Manton?
 

hopkins_student

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It originally happened when members of the lower classes would wear out their shirts' cuffs and collars before the bodies wore out. Unable to match the fabrics, tailors would replace the patterned cuffs and collars with white ones. It was a way for the lower classes to save money by not having to replace the entire shirt.
 

zjpj83

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It originally happened when members of the lower classes would wear out their shirts' cuffs and collars before the bodies wore out. Unable to match the fabrics, tailors would replace the patterned cuffs and collars with white ones. It was a way for the lower classes to save money by not having to replace the entire shirt.
Wow, so its origins are completely the opposite of what I assumed. It's funny how often things are taken from the poor or working classes and made highly desirable as fashionable or luxury items.
 

Alexander Kabbaz

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It originally happened when members of the lower classes would wear out their shirts' cuffs and collars before the bodies wore out. Unable to match the fabrics, tailors would replace the patterned cuffs and collars with white ones. It was a way for the lower classes to save money by not having to replace the entire shirt.
You got everything correct ... except the class. Members of the lower classes did not typically wear dress shirts, nor could they afford tailors. Members of the middle and upper classes did and could.

a little too Gordon Gekko for my usual dealings
Yo, Dude. You got sumpin against the Gekko? To quote gordgekko, "them's fightin' words". Midnight. Thursday. Under the West Side El at 15th. Your choice: Pens or swords.
 

hopkins_student

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It originally happened when members of the lower classes would wear out their shirts' cuffs and collars before the bodies wore out. Unable to match the fabrics, tailors would replace the patterned cuffs and collars with white ones. It was a way for the lower classes to save money by not having to replace the entire shirt.
You got everything correct ... except the class. Members of the lower classes did not typically wear dress shirts, nor could they afford tailors. Members of the middle and upper classes did and could.
I'm certain that you are correct. I suppose this is why we shouldn't believe everything that Glenn O'Brien writes in GQ.
 

Gatsby

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I actually just ordered my first shirt in this style 2 weeks ago, part of my whole 80's banker revivalist look...: - canary yellow 2ply cotton - white 2 button wide-spread high collar - white 2 button 'turn-up' cuffs - plain front - split yoke, gussets - thick MoP buttons - contrast light blue buttonhole stitch (which wouldn't be readily visible if I were to wear a tie) - no monogramming
A couple questions on terminology: Is there an official name for this look (the white collar/cuffs on different color/pattern shirt). My Japanese tailor calls it "cleric", but I'm not sure if that's just standard Japanese "adopted English" or not. Also, for the 'turn-up' cuffs, is there a more official name as well? The same tailor calls them "Milano" cuffs. Does anyone know what I'm talking about??
 

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