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which is a better city: Chicago or New York?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by crazyquik, Feb 10, 2009.

  1. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    Hmm. I wonder why our experiences are so different. I guess there's a mix of both going on, and I am happy to hear that traditional Muglai preparation is carried forth in some homes even today.

    hey, people couldn't been shitting me, too, I don't know. I was always amazed at how much my friends were "into" food - and really took pride on what they brought to work or served at home.
     
  2. feynmix

    feynmix Senior member

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    Exactly. A good quality home cooked meal, when it takes a long time to prepare the food, will be better because when it is ready, it is consumed. Lots of restaurants have to prepare that kind of thing in advance and reheat before serving. As a result, it just isn't as good.

    I have a substantial number of Indian friends, and they were all always complaining about US Indian food. So I asked about it, and they invited me over one time for a traditional meal that they prepared themselves. Night and day.


    I am pretty sure restaurants in India do the same thing: Prepare food in advance, and then heat it up as necessary. But the food is f'in delicious regardless. I don't know for sure what it is, but one of the points to consider is the cooks here in the US just aren't that good either.
     
  3. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    I am pretty sure restaurants in India do the same thing: Prepare food in advance, and then heat it up as necessary. But the food is f'in delicious regardless. I don't know for sure what it is, but one of the points to consider is the cooks here in the US just aren't that good either.

    I think that indian food lends itself to be heated up. I think that the big sin is when they just throw some poached white meat chicken into a bottled sauce - and I am sure than most american places do that, and few indian places to.


    take a piece of meat from an indian food dish - cut it in half. the sauce should permeate all the way through, not just on the surface. and it should have a bone.
     
  4. sploosh

    sploosh Senior member

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    I thought New York city was a lot better and more culturally diverse, but it depends on what kind of person you are.
     
  5. SField

    SField Senior member

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    It's funny how you think owning an apartment qualifies you as a local?? Your neighborhood is full of people with a little $$ from other cities, and is the most gentrified/fake place in Chicago. You're that dense?

    Do you really like hanging out like a creep at the hotel bars that much? Or just love all the tourists and great chain restaurants in your neighborhood??


    Ok, let's get this straight. First of all, I never act like a local. What did I comment on RE: Chicago?

    The food. You said the food is crap which I disagree with. I think my knowledge of food carries with it a little more credibility than yours does. I never spoke about anything else to do with Chicago.

    Secondly, the place I live in and its surroundings have been there for a long time, and so have many of the people who live there. Maybe I only have a little bit of money but most of the people in my building have paid anywhere from few to many millions of dollars to live there. Most of the buildings around me are old and have been premiere residences for a long, long time. I don't get what is touristy or undesireable about living 10 steps away from Symphony Hall, the Fine Arts building, one of the best art museums in the world, and many other appealling things. Also, most of the low end eating around my place are mom and pop joints (even all the way out passed Jackson). As you do know if you've seen me write about food, I never go to chain restaurants or participate in any of the activities that you mention. You're clearly and angry person with student loans and a shitty studio apartment. You see what I did there? I made a assumptions.
     
  6. SField

    SField Senior member

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    Hhhmmm. Its one of those very rare times when I agree with a gdl203 post. Questioning Brians intelligence or calling gdl203 a "whiny bitch" are both completely unnecessary.

    Hopefully sfield will reflect on this during his timeout and no longer feel the need to say such things.

    The system works, people!!!!!


    I never said anything to Brian, and never insulted a Mod. I called Cavalier a moron, not anyone else.
     
  7. upstarter

    upstarter Senior member

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    Name me places in the US with GREAT indian food (I'm genuinely curious, I'm ok with Brick Lane level anyway).

    Al Noor in LA (Lawndale to be precise) OUT OF THIS WORLD!

    Tikka massala, palak panner, and chicken tala gosht.
     
  8. redcaimen

    redcaimen Senior member

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    I never said anything to Brian, and never insulted a Mod. I called Cavalier a moron, not anyone else.

    I think you have misunderstood the intent and spirit of my post. Although I share RJMans opinion of you, my comments here have nothing whatever to do with you. You were merely a convenient tool, a found object.
     
  9. SField

    SField Senior member

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    Hhhmmm. Its one of those very rare times when I agree with a gdl203 post. Questioning Brians intelligence or calling gdl203 a "whiny bitch" are both completely unnecessary.

    Hopefully sfield will reflect on this during his timeout and no longer feel the need to say such things.

    The system works, people!!!!!


    Do you not get it? I never questioned Brian's intelligence. I don't think I've even spoken with him recently on this forum. Where do you get this from?

    I think you have misunderstood the intent and spirit of my post. Although I share RJMans opinion of you, my comments here have nothing whatever to do with you. You were merely a convenient tool, a found object.

    You're right, you certainly do have a lot in common with RJ.
     
  10. redcaimen

    redcaimen Senior member

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    Do you not get it? I never questioned Brian's intelligence. I don't think I've even spoken with him recently on this forum. Where do you get this from?



    You're right, you certainly do have a lot in common with RJ.



    Sigh....

    It is you who does not get it but thats okay. As far as RJ, we really have little in common. Our politics are quite different. He is a francophile and I dont think that would be a good description of me. (hint: this is understatement) I dont mind cats but I prefer dogs. He has an advanced proffesional degree. I dont even have an AA degree. He prefers the dishonest gay egomaniac Gore Vidal and the solipsistic tantrums he throws, I would choose the more honest gaze of the gay egomaniac Truman Capote. But I do enjoy his snark (my current fav - Vox Santorum) and of course we will always have you. [​IMG]
     
  11. Xiaogou

    Xiaogou Senior member

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    Wouldn't Northwestern and UChicago be superior to NYU and Columbia?

    In my opinion, no.
     
  12. Xiaogou

    Xiaogou Senior member

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    seriously, does anybody who has spent serious time in both believe that nyc is better for culinary diversity? I mean, that his the myth, but I don't believe it is true. nyc has better chinese, chicago better vietnamese, mexican, indian and italian. nyc better bagels, chicago better german. nyc better ny style pizza, chicago better chicago style pizza.

    While I can speak to some things, I will keep it to Viet food. My wife who is from Vietnam claims that the Viet food in Nyc > Viet food in Chicago (nothing beats SoCal). This is in terms of quality and quantity.

    In terms of diversity being a product of quantity-- Chicago does not have any Khmer (Cambodian), Laos or Burmese restaurants that I know of--could be wrong. Over the past 100 years, more immigrants have settled in NYC--thus giving them more culinary diversity.
     
  13. otc

    otc Senior member

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    In my opinion, no.

    In my opinion, yes.
     
  14. Connemara

    Connemara Senior member

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    In my opinion, yes.
    Well, I think that Columbia and Chicago are about equal in prestige. I can say with a good deal of confidence that in the humanities they are indeed on common ground. For example, both institutions have perennially top 10 history programs. Another aspect: I think most agree that Columbia's public policy/int'l studies school is better than Chicago's. But again, that is up for grabs. As for NYU and Northwestern...well, I think Northwestern is better as a comprehensive university. And FWIW, which is admittedly not much, NYU surely has better name recognition on the East Coast. NYU does have some esteemed programs like law and medicine, though those are also exceedingly good at Northwestern.
     
  15. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    While I can speak to some things, I will keep it to Viet food. My wife who is from Vietnam claims that the Viet food in Nyc > Viet food in Chicago (nothing beats SoCal). This is in terms of quality and quantity.

    In terms of diversity being a product of quantity-- Chicago does not have any Khmer (Cambodian), Laos or Burmese restaurants that I know of--could be wrong. Over the past 100 years, more immigrants have settled in NYC--thus giving them more culinary diversity.


    point taken. I am not a real conisuer of vn food. what I like about chicago is that you have, what I find to be good vn food easily accesible

    and, yes, haven't noticed any khmer loation or burmese food in chicago.
     
  16. BP348

    BP348 Senior member

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    I grew up in Chicago and have never visited NY. But I have several friends and family members who have visited NYC. From what they say Chicago they like Chicago better. I'm going to say I'm biased and just stick with Chicago.

    What's with all the hype on Indian food? Sorry I've tried it a few times and it's OK but not something I'd go out of my way to get.

    Also everyone gets that Mexican food changes by region? So food here in South Texas is different then the food you find in El Paso, AZ, or CA.
     
  17. Joel12345

    Joel12345 New Member

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    Hmm, it's called Second City for a reason.

    A great city, but clearly second.


    Study up - it's called the "Second City" because it was rebuilt after the Chicago Fire, thus the rebuilt Chicago was "second."
     
  18. milosz

    milosz Senior member

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    I'm sure the experience of living there would alter my perception, but it seemed pretty awesome to have affordable, nice townhomes right down the road from the Wrigley area. Friends who actually live in Chicago are not so big on Wrigleyville, though.

    As a strike against it, I'm not sure I could live in Chicago without a car (enormous bonus to NY/SF, IMO) and the guns laws are bullshit (as they are in NY/SF as well, of course).

    Not sure about current Chicago music, but a lot of music I love (Jon Langford/Old 97's/Bloodshot Records) has strong ties there.
     
  19. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    You could live pretty decently in both cities with about $1M going out the door annually in taxes, food, clothes, and paper products (cups, plates, napkins). Other stuff, too, like nice ink for your fountain pens and contributions to the political party of your choice. Cable.

    Once you drop down to around $250K, though, you would have to move to somewhere like Indiana or maybe San Francisco to get by.


    - B
     
  20. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    I'm sure the experience of living there would alter my perception, but it seemed pretty awesome to have affordable, nice townhomes right down the road from the Wrigley area. Friends who actually live in Chicago are not so big on Wrigleyville, though.

    As a strike against it, I'm not sure I could live in Chicago without a car (enormous bonus to NY/SF, IMO) and the guns laws are bullshit (as they are in NY/SF as well, of course).

    Not sure about current Chicago music, but a lot of music I love (Jon Langford/Old 97's/Bloodshot Records) has strong ties there.


    I lived in Wrigleyville for a year. It's fine, if a little boring. Annoying as hell on game days. But otherwise very nice.
    And trust me, you can definitely live in Chicago without a car. Easily.
     

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