What was the inspiration for 80's type suits?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by othertravel, Mar 26, 2012.

  1. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    Armani (American Gigolo) 100%. Later came Miami Vice. The 80's, despite its horrors was still much better than the 1970's.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2012
  2. IndianBoyz

    IndianBoyz Senior member

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  3. IndianBoyz

    IndianBoyz Senior member

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  4. IndianBoyz

    IndianBoyz Senior member

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  5. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Prof. Fabulous Dubiously Honored

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    Valentino didn't have much of a menswear presence in the 1980's; I think his mensline was mostly licensed during this time.

    Really, the 1980's were three names: Versace, Armani, and... Gianfranco Ferre.

    Because the latter has fallen off the radar, we tend to overlook it, but no discussion of 1980's menswear is complete without it. While Versace had the wild/rococco and Armani the relaxed/unstructured, Ferre had the big shoulders, the structuring, the constructed layers/materials, etc.

    ...also don't forget Hugo Boss.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2012
  6. IndianBoyz

    IndianBoyz Senior member

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    True, but that pic illustrated a true 80's cut.
     
  7. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Prof. Fabulous Dubiously Honored

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    I agree, but mostly Valentino uomo from the period was just pulling trends/copying from other places. Virtually all the "big names" HAD a menswear line, but the vast majority of them (YSL, Dior, Valentino, Givenchy, Lanvin, etc.) were either fully licensed out, or were just afterthoughts to the women's line.

    Versace, Ferre, and Armani were different, though... for they had dedicated menswear lines alongside the women's, defining trends, having runway shows, etc.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2012
  8. Pliny

    Pliny Senior member

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    ^^^^ altho maybe not the armpit-high rise and straight wide drop in the pants lol

    Great post. Spot on with Huey's look from 1981.

    The 'New Wave' that kicked off the 80s was all about skinny - inch-wide ties and lapels, and as u say, a reaction against glam and disco-inspired excess in menswear. That was pre-Rambo, pre-Arnie, and the pre- the hugeness that became the defining body silhouette later in the decade.
     
  9. Threadbearer

    Threadbearer Senior member

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    David Byrne from 1984's Stop Making Sense:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Pliny

    Pliny Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    early 1980s WAYWRN, first attempt at a Robopose






    Elvis Costello etc
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2012
  11. jamesny

    jamesny Senior member

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    There was another documentary on Giorgio Armani and how he revolutionized fashion in general. Good stuff. Armani suits are classics.
     
  12. Testudo_Aubreii

    Testudo_Aubreii Senior member

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    Yes, sorry. I should have said "all RTW makers who followed Armani."

    Still, it is hard to avoid the influence of the fashion. I'll bet that the silhouettes Chipp and Norman Hilton were selling in 1988 looked a lot more like Armani than the ones they were selling in 1978. I have to struggle with my tailors to get a silhouette that doesn't pay homage to the 1962 silhouette.
     
  13. Testudo_Aubreii

    Testudo_Aubreii Senior member

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    I actually think the 1970s coat silhouettes were pretty nice. Narrow, high shoulders, cut close to the body, wide lapels. Three-pieces abounded. I agree that the flared trouser bottoms were bad and fabric choices too often poor. Still, tailored clothing had a more robust and widespread presence in the 70s than it had in the 80s.

    Some nice examples here:
    http://www.cutterandtailor.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=585&st=0
     
  14. F. Corbera

    F. Corbera Senior member

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  15. othertravel

    othertravel Senior member

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    The cut and drape of the 70s were nice; but as you mentioned (and as seen in the pics) the fabrics were awful.
     

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