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What novels should I read next?

GQgeek

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I'd say i've probably read most of the books on a standard high-school curriculum, so you can spare me those. I just finished Anna K and enjoyed it but I think i'd like something shorter. Books that deal with human relationships/human nature would be good. I'd prefer stuff that falls into the realm of classic literature for now. I tend to prefer the writing style of older authors, different as they may be as a group.

thx.
 

Hombre Secreto

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The Brothers Karamazov?
 

why

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Originally Posted by Hombre Secreto
The Brothers Karamazov?

Seriously?

I don't understand the endless veneration of the same three or four Russian authors. English has a lot of great literature, most of it far better than anything Dostoyevsky ever wrote. Plus, reading English authors gives nice little benefit of reading an author's writing instead of a translator's sterilization.

I will always suggest Spenser and Shakespeare when people ask this question, but if by 'classic' you actually mean '19th century' (there's a millenium or two of difference), then Dickens is probably the best. I like Hard Times. Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is also great. If you're an Anglophobe, read Melville. If not Moby Dick, then at least Bartleby.
 

GQgeek

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Originally Posted by why
Seriously? I don't understand the endless veneration of the same three or four Russian authors. English has a lot of great literature, most of it far better than anything Dostoyevsky ever wrote. Plus, reading English authors gives nice little benefit of reading an author's writing instead of a translator's sterilization. I will always suggest Spenser and Shakespeare when people ask this question, but if by 'classic' you actually mean '19th century' (there's a millenium or two of difference), then Dickens is probably the best. I like Hard Times. Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is also great. If you're an Anglophobe, read Melville. If not Moby Dick, then at least Bartleby.
I say classic in the sense that the authors are dead, it wasn't written recently, and that it's well regarded work, though I don't know i'd limit myself to 19th century either. I guess I'm looking for books I might have overlooked as well. And no, i'm not looking to read any more euripides, aeschylus, sophocles, or homer. I read enough of that stuff doing a classics degree. ;p
 

Hombre Secreto

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Originally Posted by why
Seriously?

English has a lot of great literature, most of it far better than anything Dostoyevsky ever wrote.


Far better? Like what?
 

why

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Originally Posted by Hombre Secreto
Far better? Like what?
I already gave a decent list of Dostoyevsky's contemporaries in English literature that are far better than he. If you want to start including poets, playwrights, and people not his contemporaries then the contest just becomes unfair. Here, I'll ask you a question: what do you like about Dostoyevsky? I think most people enjoy saying they read Dostoyevsky's writing than actually reading it. I also think most people lack the capability to read Dostoyevsky's writing, anyway. Just get the Cliff's Notes so you can keep up your pretense in case anybody challenges you.
 

grundletaint

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the celestine prophecy
davinci code
marley and me
 

indesertum

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if you like books about human nature and human relationships

i've been reading sons and lovers by DH lawrence and I think you'd really like it. I dunno if high schoolers read it.
 

Hombre Secreto

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Originally Posted by why
I already gave a decent list of Dostoyevsky's contemporaries in English literature that are far better than he. If you want to start including poets, playwrights, and people not his contemporaries then the contest just becomes unfair.
That's just your opinion, many would disagree.
Originally Posted by why
Here, I'll ask you a question: what do you like about Dostoyevsky? I think most people enjoy saying they read Dostoyevsky's writing than actually reading it. I also think most people lack the capability to read Dostoyevsky's writing, anyway. Just get the Cliff's Notes so you can keep up your pretense in case anybody challenges you.
What the fuck are you babbling about??? Lack the capability to read Dostoyevsky's writing? What's so hard to get about Brothers Karamazov? It's a story mostly based on 4 brothers with different personalities that most of us see ourselves in at least 1 of the brothers. No!! It was actually about some confused young monk with a badly bitten finger that was heading off to California to have someone take a look at it. Yeah, that was what the book was about. And why don't you challenge me about Brothers Karamazov? The Grand Inquisitor alone probably shits on anything you would recommend.
 

milosz

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Originally Posted by why
I already gave a decent list of Dostoyevsky's contemporaries in English literature that are far better than he. If you want to start including poets, playwrights, and people not his contemporaries then the contest just becomes unfair.

I love your schtick, I truly do.
 

lawyerdad

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Originally Posted by why
Here, I'll ask you a question: what do you like about Dostoyevsky? I think most people enjoy saying they read Dostoyevsky's writing than actually reading it. I also think most people lack the capability to read Dostoyevsky's writing, anyway. Just get the Cliff's Notes so you can keep up your pretense in case anybody challenges you.
Um, no.
Originally Posted by grundletaint
the celestine prophecy davinci code marley and me
Doesn't really fit his criteria, I'd say. How about Nabokov? Dickens? Twain? If you haven't read 100 Years of Solitude, that's one I would recommend. Based on your stated criteria, you might enjoy Junichoro Tanizaki.
 

delakingois

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Murakami. Preferably Kafka on the shore or The wind-up bird chronicle. I'll admit that I only read the headline before answering, but I'm gonna stick with this...
 

indesertum

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i kind of dont understand the veneration of murakami. his wind up bird chronicle was mind boggling and mind bogglingly weird. it's hard to understand modern reading. i heard a lot of messed up things happen in kafka on the shore. i mean -_- what the heck. how do you get weirder than wind up bird. not trying to ruin anything, but urinary tract infection from sexual relationships with multiple men and sibling homicide was just way weird.

i really truly disliked kafka's the castle, but his short stories are very engaging.
 

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