1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

What Movies Are You Watching Lately

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by edinatlanta, Nov 29, 2010.

  1. akatsuki

    akatsuki Senior member

    Messages:
    2,648
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2008
    Location:
    Brooklyn, SF, Tokyo
    
    ]]

    When they are cheaply contrived - yes.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. in stitches

    in stitches Senior member Moderator

    Messages:
    68,895
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2010
    Location:
    Charm City
  3. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

    Messages:
    11,353
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    Location:
    Pennsylvania Ave/Connecticut Ave
    I watched Paid in Full (gangster movie from the early/mid 90s) over the weekend. Not ground breaking or anything but pretty good. A few characters from the wire make an appearance.
     
  4. ter1413

    ter1413 Senior member

    Messages:
    18,044
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    Location:
    Central Booking
    

    You should check out Blood In Blood Out. Pretty good West Side gang/jail flick.
     
  5. OmniscientCause

    OmniscientCause Senior member

    Messages:
    2,276
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    

    I agree great flick I've seen it 5 times. Each with a different person or group because I wanted to make sure they watched it.
     
  6. akatsuki

    akatsuki Senior member

    Messages:
    2,648
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2008
    Location:
    Brooklyn, SF, Tokyo
    Just watched the Raid 2. Damn was that the perfect action movie.
     
    2 people like this.
  7. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Senior member

    Messages:
    7,668
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    I liked Prisoners as I liked 24, but both felt like a pretty contrived apologia for torture.
     
  8. seeldoger47

    seeldoger47 Senior member

    Messages:
    432
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2012
    Under the Skin is one of my most favorite movies ever. I saw it in theaters five times in one week. Huge WA fan, but I thought Blue Jasmine was a very poor man's A Streetcar Named Desire.

    And for all you Wes Anderson fans, here is a insightful outline of his cinema:
    Wes Anderson's new comedy pushes the imaginative exuberance of his past work to a new extreme. The private school in Rushmore, with its violent, foul-mouthed, enterprising student body; the Manhattan brownstone in The Royal Tenenbaums, its atmosphere polluted by dashed hopes, failed dreams and unrequited affections; the luxury train taking three compulsively secretive and suspicious brothers across North-west India in The Darjeeling Limited: all are made to look dowdy and sketchy by Anderson's latest setting. Sixteen miles long, densely forested, entirely unpaved, visited once a day by aeroplane, twice a day by ferry, New Penzance Island is given its own geography (arcane) and cartography (faithfully reproduced). Its own bibliography, too: twelve-year-old Suzy Bishop (Kara Hayward) finds solace in such works of fantasy as Shelly and the Secret Universe by Olympia Le-Tan, while her bickering parents (Bill Murray and Frances McDormand) seek counsel in Coping with the Very Troubled Child by Romulus Trilling. The decade during which the Bishops are enduring the evergreen misery of American family life bears little resemblance to the 1960s that we know and fetishize. Nobody seems to have a television. The only magazine on show pertains to boy scouts. The songs of The Kinks, The Who and The Rolling Stones, associated with the period, and with Anderson's previous films, are nowhere to be heard. But there is music throughout the film, on screen and on the soundtrack. When Suzy runs away from home to go native with her boyfriend, the orphan and khaki scout Sam Shakusky (Jared Gilman), she brings along a Françoise Hardy record. (It is as if Anderson is incapable of imagining a universe, even an alternative one, that could exist without ye-ye.) Sam and Suzy have to elude her parents, his troop leader (Edward Norton), the rest of his troop, and the local police captain (Bruce Willis). The Hardy record - a reissue of Tous les garçons et les filles - proves important to this prepubescent, premature (1965) Summer of Love, but not as important as the presence, in various forms, of Benjamin Britten.

    Moonrise Kingdom doesn't offer any kind of reading of Britten's work, or even a coherent application of it, but it does show that when it comes to generating certain associations (pastoral adventure, innocence, redemption, male groups, the outsider) a little Britten goes along way. A prominent place is reserved for "Playful Pizzicato" from the early Simple Symphony (beginning) and for "Cuckoo" from Songs from Friday Afternoons (end), and the opera Noye's Fludde is performed by the New Penzancers every summer (at least), but it's The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra, described by the boy-announcer as "a big piece of music that is made up of smaller pieces", that supplies the film's controlling metaphor - the old Anderson thing about forging a community of individuals, putting differences aside without denying human variety.
    Anderson's previous films have tended to present internal conflict, incompatible desires, as the primary impediment to the harmony of the gang (Bottle Rocket), the team (The Life Aquatic), the double act (Rushmore), and the family unit (The Royal Tenenbaums, Fantastic Mr Fox, The Darjeeling Limited). Here conformism is registered as a danger, a threat to individuality. It is not a case of misfits learning to get along but of misfits being accommodated by systems that prefer, encourage or live by homogeneity. Suzy's younger brothers, who own a copy of The Young Person's Guide and play it on the few occasions when their sister hasn't stolen the record player, constitute a single force, isolating her in terms of age, gender and temperament. "You're a traitor to our family", one of them informs her. "Good", she replies. "I want to be." Sam's numerous foster siblings, all of them older boys, dress in matching white T-shirt and jeans, and khaki scout Troop 55 have an official uniform and a more or less official straight-backed attitude. (Even the boy called Nickleby gives him a hard time.) When Sam asks one of the scouts why he doesn't like him, he receives a classic pack member's reply: "Why should I? No one else does".

    In a letter to Owen Brannigan, Britten said that Noye's Fludde was a work "very much in the naïve medieval style". Moonrise Kingdom is conducted in the faux-naïf mannerist style that Anderson has made his own: the colour schemes and Futura typesetting (reserved here for Sam's letterhead) and inter-titles; the doll's-house sets and symmetrical compositions and theatrical framing devices; the lateral tracking shots (he always shoots in widescreen) and extreme close-ups (on faces and handwriting) and sudden cutaways, the excitable camera so amused by the belated revelation of activity just off-screen; the dialogue, somewhere between Harold Pinter and J. D. Salinger, with swift and fluent exchanges that become caught in crossed wires, producing an air of confusion sometimes panicked and confrontational, sometimes intimate and forgiving. The majority of the jokes in Moonrise Kingdom, as in the other films, are based on a principle of inversion - children behaving like adults, adults behaving like children, callous behaviour in moments that call for diplomacy, a posture of professionalism applied to amateur activities. Edward Norton, though very sporting in the role of the scout leader who loses first one of his charges, then all of them, is playing a character defined by his belief in something we are invited to find ludicrous; Jared Gilman, who plays Sam, is a virtuoso performer, a specialist in the confounding reply, but the character's potential for independent life is crabbed by the essential Bugsy Malone incongruity, the continual obligation to be wise or po-faced beyond his years - a continual obligation to amuse. (As for Bill Murray's performance, a collaboration born out of a defiance of typecasting has become a cliché in its own right; his role here - another luckless, lipless sadsack - carries a sediment of in-joke and allusion.) There was a bracing sincerity to Anderson's early films, evident in such moments as Max's first glimpse of Mrs Cross (reading Kidnapped to her Rushmore class) and Margot Tenenbaum getting off a bus as watched by her brother Richie (in slow motion, to Nico's "These Days"), that has been lost as his sensibility has grown increasingly deflective.

    Of the two parts of his personality, the ironist has won out over the elegist, the balance of the painful and the playful being tipped in favour of the latter. The new film is distinguished by its powerful use of Britten's music, its evocative milieux, the charm and distinctiveness of its conceits, and by Anderson's gift for nonsense and non sequitur; yet it confirms, in its winky casting (Harvey Keitel as the scout commander, Tilda Swinton as the woman known as Social Services), shortterm jokes and the joy it takes in parody and pastiche, in prop and decor as an end in themselves, that Anderson belongs to the tradition of Peter Bogdanovich, Pedro Almodóvar, the Coen Brothers and Quentin Tarantino, and, behind them all, François Truffaut - not the Truffaut of Jules et Jim, or even of the short Les Mistons and Small Change, who found the ways of children so irresistible, but the Truffaut of The Bride Wore Black and Vivement Dimanche!, taking a crack at the genres he loved as a boy, casting whole films in inverted commas.

    Anderson openly declared his affection for Truffaut (as if it could not be inferred from the precocity of his children and the earnestness of his young men), in an advert for American Express that took the form of a two-minute pastiche of Day for Night. It was an amusing exercise but a depressing sight - the director who, of all the members of his gifted generation, seemed capable of the greatest level of emotional directness expending energy on work at a good four or five removes from anything resembling reality. Pauline Kael was the first, or anyway the loudest, disparager of Truffaut's retreat into homage, complaining as early as Fahrenheit 451 (1966) that "Truffaut has it in him not to create small artificial worlds around gimmicky plots, but to open up the big world, and to be loose and generous and free and easy with it". (Elsewhere, she speculated that "Truffaut may be a greater artist than he wants to allow himself to be".) In Anderson's case, an increasing desire for creative dominion (the use of animation in Fantastic Mr Fox, the configuration of New Penzance here) is coupled with a taste for the unruly; a director who would storyboard the audience's response if it were possible finds himself drawn repeatedly to animals and children and explosives and heartbreak, to error and folly and misconstrual (though conflict in his films has been increasingly easy to solve). While it is wonderful to see what choices Anderson makes in terms of visual texture and social portraiture when he builds a world from scratch, the delight, here as elsewhere, comes with an undertow of disappointment, at all those challenges shirked.
    To which Jonathan Rosenbaum (the greatest American film critic since James Agee and Manny Farber) offers some thoughts :
    My subscription to the Times Literary Supplement generally isn’t motivated by much expectation of any enlightenment about filmic matters, but every once in a blue moon I’m pleasantly surprised. For the record, I don’t agree at all with the closing paragraphs of Leo Robson’s review of the delightfully singular Moonrise Kingdom in the June 1 issue. He thinks that “bracing sincerity” and/or “emotional directness” and what he hypothesizes as a resemblance to mundane reality are necessarily kissing cousins, and then faults Moonrise Kingdom for not having as much of the former two qualities as Rushmore, whereas I don’t see much of any obligatory connection between emotions and the conventions of so-called realism — which are incidentally just as remote in some ways from Rushmore as they are from Anderson’s subsequent films. (And for that matter, I wouldn’t fault Moonrise Kingdom for any emotional deficiencies, or dream of linking Anderson’s taste for pastiche and parody with the likes of Almodóvar, Bogdanovich, the brothers Coen, or Tarantino.) But before Robson arrives at these highly dubious conclusions, this is one of the most perceptive outlines of the Wes Anderson System that I’ve read. This review isn’t available online, by the way, so if you decide it’s worth tracking down, I guess you’ll have to find this issue either in one of the few remaining bookshops that handle periodicals or in a library somewhere.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  9. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Senior member

    Messages:
    7,668
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    James Agee -- modernist master -- was a film critic? I had no idea.
     
  10. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Senior member

    Messages:
    7,668
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    Holy shit, Agee on Film! This is truly the best news I've heard all week. :slayer:
     
  11. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

    Messages:
    8,518
    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    Location:
    El Barrio
    I've wanted to watch this for a while. Have you seen "Searching for Sugarman"?
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2014
  12. seeldoger47

    seeldoger47 Senior member

    Messages:
    432
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2012
    James Agee: Film Writing and Selected Journalism > Agee on Film!

    If you like Agee's writing check out anything by Susan Sontag, Jonathan Rosenbaum, and Manny Farber.
     
  13. BBSLM

    BBSLM Senior member

    Messages:
    1,750
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2008
    

    He definitely killed it. Two scenes in particular for me were the hammer scene in the bathroom, and his conversation with Detective Loki outside the liquor store. Goosebumps, man. Melissa Leo was great, too. Creeped me the fuck out.


    You wouldn't be the first person to suggest Prisoners as a metaphor for the Iraq war.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2014
  14. gettoasty

    gettoasty Senior member

    Messages:
    12,296
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Location:
    Home
    I'm on a Tom Cruise marathon as of late after seeing Oblivion and Edge of Tomorrow...

    Saw MI and need to watch II, III, IV and V.

    Just finished Vanilla Sky since it was on Baidu...I think I saw bits and pieces of it before and only realized it at the very end scenes. A real trip, and sad. I dated a girl briefly with very similar features as Penelope Cruz, and the sequence of events that occurred in the movie brought on feelings. I always enjoy sci-fi thriller films.

    * * *

    Jack Reacher was cool. Seemed too straight forward though (I bet the books were better).
     
  15. BBSLM

    BBSLM Senior member

    Messages:
    1,750
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2008
    

    Collateral should be the next Cruise film you watch. Probably his best role (or possibly Magnolia). I like Eyes Wide Shut, too.

    If you liked Vanilla Sky (which is pretty underrated IMO) you should watch the original - Abre Los Ojos
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  16. in stitches

    in stitches Senior member Moderator

    Messages:
    68,895
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2010
    Location:
    Charm City
    


    Thanks for the reminder.
     
  17. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

    Messages:
    27,420
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Location:
    NE PA
    

    Abre Los Ojos was amazing. Came out BEFORE the Matrix, too.

    But Cruise in Eyes Wide Shut is just amazing. That son of a bitch can act, and he proved it there.

    I have the DVD version of Eyes Wide Shut so I don't know if it translated to other formats, but turn the closed captioning on when Cruise in the costume shop and Leelee sobieski whispers in his ear. Then have your mind blown.
     
  18. akatsuki

    akatsuki Senior member

    Messages:
    2,648
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2008
    Location:
    Brooklyn, SF, Tokyo
    I did love Eyes Wide Shut, but I felt that Tom Cruise is a passenger in that movie while things happen around him. Being wide-eyed and shocked most of the time doesn't take massive acting skills and I suspect another actor in the role could have done better. But I have never seen Magnolia where I hear he does better.

    There is definitely a school of actors who just play themselves in every movie - Tom Cruise, Nic Cage, Keanu Reeves, etc. When I see them, I think of their real name and not the role they are supposedly inhabiting.

    There are those where they often play themselves, but have shown that they can subsume themselves in a role - Will Smith in Ali comes to mind; maybe Charlize Theron in Monster. And those who completely lose themselves in the role - Daniel Day Lewis being the most obvious example.
     
  19. ballmouse

    ballmouse Senior member

    Messages:
    1,102
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2011
     
  20. Kleinfeld

    Kleinfeld Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2014
    The death band documentary sounds very interesting, I need to find it
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by