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What I've Learned in Business So Far...

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Artisan Fan, Mar 1, 2011.

  1. Art Vandelay

    Art Vandelay Well-Known Member

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    This thread is pin worthy.
     
  2. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    This thread is pin worthy.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Monaco

    Monaco Senior member

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    Lots of great experience to learn from here, thanks!

    Anybody expanded to China from America?
     
  4. Eason

    Eason Senior member

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    Lots of great experience to learn from here, thanks! Anybody expanded to China from America?
    I moved here about two years ago and I speak their moon-language fluently, but define "expanded"? Douglas owns a company which often does business with the Chinamen, if he has time I'm sure he has a lot of things he's learned doing business with the inscrutable orientals.
     
  5. Matt

    Matt Senior member

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    This thread is pin worthy.

    fair call. done.
     
  6. Eason

    Eason Senior member

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    Pinned threads are too easy to ignore [​IMG]
     
  7. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    Pinned threads are too easy to ignore [​IMG]

    Hopefully my new content will make it worth everyone's time.
     
  8. KJT

    KJT Senior member

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    Great thread. Keep em coming.
     
  9. olualbert

    olualbert Senior member

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  10. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    Building a Kevlar Vest for Business Some high level thoughts on what you can do to insulate yourself (not 100% of the time, that's impossible) from politics and reorgs: 1. Have a good attitude. This works wonders. 2. Do great work. A bit obvious but has to be mentioned. 3. Find a mentor outside of the company who can advise you on your career. 4. Meet deliverable deadlines, both internal and external. 5. Get "attached" to revenue. Make sure what you do, or at least part of what you do, can be directly tied to your firm's revenue. 6. Respond promptly to emails. Help colleagues who are working on deals, projects, etc. Be collaborative at all times. 7. Have lunch meetings that network you into the local business community and inside your employer's community. 8. Be creative and add value to your organization by presenting a fresh idea...ie. some thought leadership...could be a new way of attacking a problem, a new product or service line, a new way to present something that is more compelling, all sorts of things. 9. Always have a Plan B. Corporate life is rough and uncertain in even the best of situations. Have an updated resume and LinkedIn profile and keep talking to your network. Think a little down the road about what trends are happening in your industry and get skills that allow you to meet those challenges. Get experience in areas where you are weak.
     
  11. unjung

    unjung Senior member

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    I think this is a bit obvious, but I almost learned the hard way, work to avoid making enemies. I work in a small, competitive niche, and in Canada in particular, the financial industry is small, and I am coming to the realization that everyone knows everyone, especially in my space. I made the mistake of sending an email shitting all over a former coworker to another former coworker, and unbelievably, the person I was shitting on read the email over the other person's shoulder at an industry function we were at. I was lucky in that the shittee has effectively ruined her own name, so I won't really get hurt by it, but it could have been worse. I now make an effort to cultivate a positive image and avoid talking about other firms or individuals in a negative light.
     
  12. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    I posted this in another thread, but think it has a place here too:

    I read once a very true statement about management:

    20% of the people do 80% of the work. Good management means finding the right thing for the other 80% to do so they will be successful, and they will stay out of the way of the other 20%.
     
  13. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    I posted this in another thread, but think it has a place here too:

    I read once a very true statement about management:

    20% of the people do 80% of the work. Good management means finding the right thing for the other 80% to do so they will be successful, and they will stay out of the way of the other 20%.


    I don't know Ron. In my business, we all work hard but management tends to have good leadership skills. In consulting the managers work pretty hard and are also responsible for getting work done. It's just that they have more administrative duties and have to sit on more calls so the tactical work gets done nights and weekends.
     
  14. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    I don't know Ron. In my business, we all work hard but management tends to have good leadership skills. In consulting the managers work pretty hard and are also responsible for getting work done. It's just that they have more administrative duties and have to sit on more calls so the tactical work gets done nights and weekends.
    You missed Douglas and my debate on this in the reality show thread (it was a cross-post). I backed down quite a bit. I am in consulting and I certainly have teams that fire on more than 20% of cylinders.. but that's not true in most industries. Turns out that skew of the pareto principle was adopted by the moron who wrote "The 4 hour work week" The concept is somewhat valid. You need to identify your go-to people, and you need to make sure the tasks you are giving your "needy" workers are simpler and better defined so you don't get bogged down answering questions and doing QA on basic work.
     
  15. Matt

    Matt Senior member

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    Some great books in business: Blue Ocean Strategy - Great way of thinking about business growth.
    Ok done with this. Maybe it's just not especially applicable to my life, few people go to their PR firm for product development ideas, but even then, it didn't particularly win me over. It felt very much like the authors were superimposing some theory on any business that they could, and even then, with "180 companies over 150 years" (or was it the other way around) they seemingly could only think of like a half dozen successful examples. It seemed like its wisdom boiled down to "do something the other guy isn't"...and since that doesn't justify a whole book, they made up a few charts and spent a while explaining them (in the context of the half dozen businesses that they were retroactively able to superimpose their theories on). Maybe my other bias comes from within. I guess in some ways I have intuitively been doing this for years. Hell, I founded the first international PR firm in a developing country - just tweaked a long established model in various "red oceans" and brought it to Vietnam's 2000+ kilometers of Blue Ocean coastline. I then turned around a bunch of years later and did it all over, so maybe the pearls of wisdom in this book were lost on me simply because I have been "doing something the other guy isn't" for like 7 years....
    Yup. This is good. About half way through now.
     
  16. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    I really like Blue Ocean Strategy but it is more a strategy and product development perspective than may be useful to you. It's far more specific than do something the other guy isn't.

    I forgot you were in Vietnam. I have a good friend from work vacationing over there but I'm not sure on his itinerary.
     
  17. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    Matt, Now read the Made to Stick authors Chip and Dan Heath's Switch book on changing corporate culture. This is also very good.
     
  18. yjeezle

    yjeezle Senior member

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    Matt,

    Now read the Made to Stick authors Chip and Dan Heath's Switch book on changing corporate culture. This is also very good.


    any good books on networking?
     
  19. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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