What I've Learned in Business So Far...

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Artisan Fan, Mar 1, 2011.

  1. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    Good Work Habits *Reward people who perform.
    I'd like to amend this one to include "Recognize people who perform". They go hand in hand, but you can't always control someone's comp/bonus, etc. What you can do is make sure they know you are not taking credit for their effort. I have also found most clients respond very well to this and it reflects well on you ... as you said, collaboration is key.
     
  2. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Suitsupply-sider

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    I'd like to amend this one to include "Recognize people who perform".

    They go hand in hand, but you can't always control someone's comp/bonus, etc. What you can do is make sure they know you are not taking credit for their effort.

    I have also found most clients respond very well to this and it reflects well on you ... as you said, collaboration is key.


    Good idea Ron. Recognition is important to me and most of my colleagues.
     
  3. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    Here's another piece of advice I have trouble following myself.

    Don't skimp on project closure activities. There's a tendency to complete a project and move right on to the next one, but close activities are very valuable:

    1> Measure budget against actuals - then review your initial assumptions and figure out where your estimates could have been better

    2> Measure project results against the business case - (your clients will; you should have an answer if they question the results)

    3> Document and review lessons learned - (mistakes are excusable, bad habits are not)

    4> Scrub your deliverables, tag them, and file them. Share them with colleagues, along with any unique knowledge gained during the project.
     
  4. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    Good Work Habits

    *Set expectations appropriately on each project. Managing people's expectations is critical.
    *If you are overloaded decline work but share the reason.
    *Look at your Outlook or other calendar the night before and think about a "to do" list to keep you on time with deliverables.
    *Prepare for every call, internal and external. Bring a point of view and any needed analysis. If you show people you are prepared then they will be inclined to include you more often.
    *Be careful who you copy on your emails. There is a fine line in business between informing important stakeholders and spamming.
    *Think twice before copying senior managers and leaders in emails. Sometimes you will be unaware of the political goings on in the executive area and an innocent email can lead to unintended consequences.
    *Consider strongly but don't obsess over format of any content. You want it to look good but you can get OCD and lose sight of the big picture.
    *Develop a network of close colleagues whom you care share analysis and thoughts with. A good critique is worth its weight in gold.
    *Find a mentor or close friend you can privately and confidentially bitch about a work issue with. Someone who can thoughtfully share 3rd party insight and advice is invaluable.
    *Avoid people who don't deliver results. Life is too short. When they blow a major deadline, make sure someone senior hears about it in a diplomatic fashion.
    *Play nice. Collaborative teams is where it is at.
    *Avoid office negativity. It may bring you down and accomplishes little beyond the initial cathartic release of pressure.
    *Reward people who perform.
    *Treat administrative and operations people with love and respect. It will pay huge dividends. There is no place for bullying anyone with a lower title or any job.
    *Communicate honestly with everyone you interface with. Senior leaders appreciate the truth-good, bad and ugly.


    evidence?

    apologies if this was already done. i could not resist.
     
  5. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Suitsupply-sider

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    Here's another piece of advice I have trouble following myself. Don't skimp on project closure activities. There's a tendency to complete a project and move right on to the next one, but close activities are very valuable: 1> Measure budget against actuals - then review your initial assumptions and figure out where your estimates could have been better 2> Measure project results against the business case - (your clients will; you should have an answer if they question the results) 3> Document and review lessons learned - (mistakes are excusable, bad habits are not) 4> Scrub your deliverables, tag them, and file them. Share them with colleagues, along with any unique knowledge gained during the project.
    5> If good results achieved, ask client if you can create a case study on either a named or unnamed basis. 6> Post client deliverables, ppts, RFPs, supporting documents, etc. on "Sharepoint" or other shared server drive. 7> If work is unique enough, create a white paper to share thought leadership. Use client as an example of the business benefits.
     
  6. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    - Leverage in-house knowledge networks to achieve cross-functional expertise.

    - Database knowledge stores for post-project data mining activities.

    - Employ informatics liberally to enhance metrical measurement and analyze measurement techniques.

    - Synergize synergy for optimal synergisticity.
     
  7. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Suitsupply-sider

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  8. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Suitsupply-sider

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    How to Argue with the Boss 1. Present a logical viewpoint. Why do you differ? Have you thought it through fully? Think about all the other stakeholders at the company that will be affected? Do they agree in finance, operations, account management, marketing, etc.? 2. Connect the dots to firm revenue, profits and clients satisfaction. If yuor argument helps the client in any way then in my experience it is well worth considering. 3. Keep it short and tell a story if possible. Managers love a good short story which might explain where your thinking is coming from, ie. "I saw that when we worked with Citi, the following things happened...{explain the key events}...therefore I believe this view incorporates the learnings from Citi better. Caveat: A good boss will enjoy a vigorous discussion. A bad boss will not. If the latter none of the above apply.
     
  9. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    A random piece of advice that came from reading the boss post....

    If the roof is on fire, just say something. But if there is an issue and you have a second to think about it, you should be presenting at least a few alternative solutions when you escalate the problem.
     
  10. Reggs

    Reggs Senior member

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    How does everyone close a presentation? What is the last sentence or two?
     
  11. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    How does everyone close a presentation? What is the last sentence or two?

    thank you
     
  12. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    Well... if I'm not getting the hook for going over time.... It's usually -
    Well - thank you again for your time. I know this was probably a lot to swallow all at once, so I'll make sure you all have my contact information and please don't hesitate to call me directly if you have any questions or if there is something you'd like to discuss in more detail.
     
  13. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    Well... if I'm not getting the hook for going over time....

    It's usually -


    actually, that is almost exactly what I say
     
  14. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Suitsupply-sider

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    How does everyone close a presentation? What is the last sentence or two?

    The "Call to Action". You ask the client to do something ranging from "buy my services" to "take this next step or two."
     
  15. thinman

    thinman Senior member

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    Great thread AF. Some travel tips: 1. I keep a duplicate set of toiletries in ziplock bags, ready to throw in my suitcase for a trip. 2. I keep a generic packing list in my empty suitcase, so packing is mindless and quick the night before a trip. Since I started doing this, I've never forgotten anything. 3. All I really need for a trip is my presentation, travel reservations, and a credit card. 4. Keeping point 3 in mind, I never put my presentation in checked luggage or luggage that could possibly be gate checked. 5. I always ask the hotel concierge "Where would a local eat breakfast/lunch/dinner in this area?" After the obligatory response telling me about the hotel restaurant and maybe a few places nearby, I say "No what I mean is, where would you eat in this area". It's not foolproof, but usually gets excellent results. 6. I keep my eyes open for restaurants with full parking lots or lines around the block of what look like the local residents.
     

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