What I've learned from Styleforum (or, a guide to not wasting money / avoid buyers remorse)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by The_Foxx, Apr 20, 2014.

  1. The_Foxx

    The_Foxx Senior member

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    Yep-- nothing here is really hard and fast rules or facts, just personal lessons learned. Hope others will add more/ add their own personal lessons learned via the forum.

    As for the bespoke vs rtw, I was really never in the same place long enough-- nor did I ever see a tailor that had all the points I was looking for. In the end, sartorio for Barneys has provided best fit and shoulder, etc for me in suits so I've been downsizing other stuff in favor of more of those!
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2014
  2. JubeiSpiegel

    JubeiSpiegel Senior member

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  3. The_Foxx

    The_Foxx Senior member

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    Def agree with the silk knits and grenadines, I should have included that in my original post-- but other than that, I've put more $$ into smooth silk ties that don't go with nearly as much-- nor do they look as good-- as the textured cloth ties as shown/ inspired by the links above!
     
  4. lordsuperb

    lordsuperb Senior member

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    What points are you looking for in a tailor, and what points in rtw do you look for? Why not bring the rtw jacket with you to a tailor to show him what you are looking for?
     
  5. JubeiSpiegel

    JubeiSpiegel Senior member

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    What i have learned from SF (and personal experience) is that you should be realistic about your wardrobe needs & goals, especially as a newbie.

    It is too easy to get caught up in the wonderful suits, beautiful oxfords, and the multitude of tie variations. Some consideration should be give to your actual needs. Too much money has been waisted not just in experimenting and hasty purchases, but on items i personally don't use that often. At one time i had about 4-5 suits, were i only have occasion to wear them maybe 3-4 times a year, same for my oxfords, same for my ties.

    Most of the money spent in my newbie days were on items i no longer own. My money is now spent on things my more casual lifestyle benefits from. Such as sport coats & odd trousers, derbies & boots, and more casual items of the sort...
     
  6. alessandromo

    alessandromo Well-Known Member

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    Nice points Fox I agree with most of them. Here are some of my own

    On Style
    - Personal style takes time to develop.
    - Dressing should be enjoyable and an expression of your personality.
    On Purchases
    - Buy less, but buy better quality.
    - Cultivate a relationship with a tailor.
    - Avoid the temptation of buying something just because it’s on sale.
    On Building a Wardrobe
    - Examine where your wardrobe has gaps and focus on filling them rather than making purchases on whim.
    - Give away / sell items you don’t wear. You should love every item in your wardrobe.
    Misc
    - Clothes should be comfortable and flattering.
     
  7. T4phage

    T4phage Senior member

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    sage
    

    don;t believe
    everything salespeople
    or adverts tell u...

    have you forgotten
    the lesson of
    artifran and
    teh truth
    ?
     
  8. NorCal_1

    NorCal_1 Senior member

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    * Taper your jacket sleeves, too, when going bespoke - So many posters on SF show up with very expensive suits and jackets with perfectly fitted shoulders, torso's and pants but jackets where the tailor attached a 'standard' ill fitting sleeves.Especially the circumference of the cuff opening. The same applies to bespoke shirts. Ill fitting sleeves are the telltale sign of RTW, so don't make your bespoke suit look like it

    * Jacket length - err on side of a little short than too long, the skirt effect ruins too many silhouette's

    * Button placement when going bespoke is critical, getting a suit made with only one fitting is probably a big mistake. I made this mistake twice before realizing it was killing how the jacket ultimately fit, even though the rest of it was perfect. Once those button holes are cut, it's too late to change it. Where the buttoning button hits is the center focal point of the entire jacket, and best not left to chance by the cutter. Spend time on it, it's important

    * Unfunded liabilities - much better to buy cloth than spend 5x more on finished garments before you are ready to have it done right. Better to acquire the hard to find fabrics when you find them than lament losing them for years later. The next recession that's around the corner is going to be worse than the last, and endure much longer than the 2008 recession, mostly because of the Trillion dollar piles of debt building up in the world (US, China, Japan, Europe) is a ticking time bomb waiting to go off. The cloth industry will look a lot different in 2-3 years time than it does today, so grab the good stuff while you can before it's lost. Word to the wise.

    * $100 Accessories can make or break your $5,000 suit - so choose conservatively first. There is a reason the 1930's was both the Golden Age of men's attire and also the decade of the Great Depression. Earth color accessories in matte fabrics (wools, linen) look better than bright, shiny ones
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
  9. The_Foxx

    The_Foxx Senior member

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    Point well taken, but obtained this info for another forum member, from the buyer who handles Kiton & sartorio who just returned from another trip to Naples

     
  10. bourbonbasted

    bourbonbasted Cyber Eliitist

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    I don't really think there is any way to avoid "bad purchases" or "buyer's remorse." You can only be completely sure of your purchases and decisions once you decide what REALLY matters to you. And, unfortunately, the only way (I know) of accomplishing that is through trial and error.

    Anyone who has spent any amount of time around clothes will be the first to tell you there is no such thing as the perfect fit, or the perfect garment, or the perfect "outfit." When you get down to nuts and bolts there are always areas to improve upon. So, to avoid chasing the dragon, I suggest figuring out what matters most.

    If it's "fit," then focus on what aspects of fit immediately stand out to you -- shoulder expression, drape, back, balance, buttoning point, etc. Once you figure out where your eye looks first, you can go from there, with each iteration (rather it be alterations to RTW or MTM or bespoke) improving upon an area that you truly care about. You start with what matters most to you and then tweak from there.

    Others will say fabric is paramount to fit. If you're in that camp then you need to make sure that is the first question that crosses your mind. Are you a "hand-finishing" fetishist? If so, then best to know which makers/tailors are going to show you the shoulder balls. And so on, and so on.

    The point is that there will always be a bunch of high-level guidelines or bits of advice. However, especially for someone starting out, not understanding why these bits are advisable makes them more or less useless. And beyond that they actually open the door to wasting more money or time because they're going off of the advice of someone else's endeavors. It leads to people obsessing over every detail of fit only to realize their suit is made of sandpaper or spending years hunting down the perfect cashmere blend only to realize a readily available one would have been all they really needed.

    While I like the spirit of the thread, I think the takeaway should be, "Take a more studied approach to dressing." Rather than "5 Weird Tricks to get 6-Pack Abs."
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
  11. edmorel

    edmorel Quality Seller!! Dubiously Honored

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    while I get that this is sort of a personal preferences threak, some of the pronouncements on here are very bizzarre. A lot of this is really more of a "how to dress like #menswear", which is fine if that is what you are going for but not everyone wants that.
     
  12. The_Foxx

    The_Foxx Senior member

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    I guess I can't disagree, but I know this-- a Sale boglioli suit at Riflessi on 57th was of decent fabric & make, but completely unconstructed jacket, no shoulder at all / true shirt shoulder with no "bump" and amazing fit trumps pretty much everything I saw or tried on in Saks this year. Same with sartorio brand suits, I've learned here that amazing handwork and buttonholes ultimately don't mean that much in the real world.
     
  13. bourbonbasted

    bourbonbasted Cyber Eliitist

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    This is exactly my point.

    But how long did it take you to come to this realization and how much money and time have you spent reaching that conclusion? There is an entire thread here related to buttonholes and multiple threads extolling the "art" of hand-finishing. So, while it may mean nothing to you, it's everything to a lot of people.

    You won't know what matters and what doesn't until you've taken the time to experience things for yourself.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
  14. NWTeal

    NWTeal Senior member

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    I might take you up on that :)
     
  15. rob

    rob Senior member

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    A good thread, if in a different vane, would be "Things I learned on SF and then, after spending $$, had to unlearn." A number of items pointed out here - not all- fall into that category.

    Rob
     

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