• Hi, I'm the owner and main administrator of Styleforum. If you find the forum useful and fun, please help support it by buying through the posted links on the forum. Our main, very popular sales thread, where the latest and best sales are listed, are posted HERE

    Purchases made through some of our links earns a commission for the forum and allows us to do the work of maintaining and improving it. Finally, thanks for being a part of this community. We realize that there are many choices today on the internet, and we have all of you to thank for making Styleforum the foremost destination for discussions of menswear and fashion.
  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

What is the deal with is Kirby Allison’s business model?

Nobilis Animus

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
1,731
Reaction score
1,293
Not unless Bond is a Kirby tie tier, although it wouldn't surprise me.
 

FlyingHorker

Distinguished Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2014
Messages
2,990
Reaction score
2,661
Fun Fact: Our very own Manton was quite the expert on Machiavelli.

Speaking of which, anybody know what he's been up to in the past four years?
Working for Trump admin, writing articles, and lecturing at colleges. "Michael Anton" is all I had to search for.

 

Yones32

New Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2021
Messages
3
Reaction score
5
Just watch the channel but never buy anything to support it? Not even a shoe horn or shoe shine brush to show support? Interesting.

movie tickets cost $12. I just tipped the kid who wiped off my golf clubs $10. Doesn’t seem like ordering something tk support a content provider that you watch is too large a task.

I support him with a like and a comment... there are others I prefer to support on youtube or via patreon whose content I follow religiously such as the comedian tim dillon, lex fridman pr the physicist sean carroll.
I met Kirby years ago in Florence, when he first went to the Pitti show with his wife. I have seen his journey and we have kept in touch. Likes and comments are great - Kirby’s production quality is in a league of its own. He spares no expense on content, his set, cameras, the attention to detail is outstanding and it speaks volumes to the respect he has for his audience and his guests, for the stories he shares with all those who watch. No one pays him for this. And those who think YouTube ads are making him tons of money have little notion of the way algorithms treat traditional content like his. He has never taken any “paid” sponsorships or sold out to the many “main stream” companies that have approached him to sell everything from shoes to watches to you name it. He has invited competitors on his channel because the guy truly believes in building a community of people who share an interest and a passion for what he brings to the table. He has never compromised the journey he believes his fellow “style” enthusiasts share with him for money. And he never will. Anyone could wrongly assume the man is wealthy or making a killing by having more “expensive” prices than cheaper companies, or by the way he dresses. I can tell you none of it has come for free. What people don’t know is that he created the direct to consumer bespoke hanger business in the US, he basically built the sapphire brand in the US via his content and all the promotion he did for them early on, which resulted in huge growth for the brand. At one point he was their Number one online seller. But brands get smart and they started to open more and more market. He has never been paid for any promotion done on shoe polish. Ever. Other companies use his content to attract buyers and undercut prices, and use certain products as loss leaders in order to gain market share, and this well may be the case. I won’t even speak about Amazon because no one can even validate what is sold there is not counterfeit. I stopped buying any edibles or products with ingredients from there a long time ago, after I saw all the counterfeit they carry (but that is another story) I am sure many people learn about brands from him, then buy from someone else. And that is fine. Use his content to make your life better. No one will care or blame you. Kirby’s true passion is sharing the journey. Just watch the Lobb video. Who does this?! The time, money and effort that it takes to produce stuff like this is mind boggling, if you consider that they guy is also running an online store. I have never been to an online store where the founder or anyone in their staff for that matter does ANYTHING for their customers other than maybe have mint videos to promote one of their products, or run sales, have marginally cheaper prices, or run phony campaigns with cheesy Instagrammers who are selling out for free product. He does so many videos where all he is doing is sharing a story, helping brands and people transcend, with no purpose other than to share the story with the world.
He doesn’t live extravagantly or grandly. He is an average man who found an interest and turned into a way to make a living. His respect and appreciation for craftsmanship and artisans allows him to share the stories in a way truly no one has. He sells what he considers the highest quality at the best price he can possibly sell. He pays his employees well, is always available for any customer who ever calls, and delivers more value than any retailer who is ONLY selling you a product. A large part of his revenue goes back into production of more amazing content, so whoever is interested can sit back on a rainy afternoon, drink a scotch and feel transported to a new place and meet new people via his channel. He is giving a voice to brands, and he doesn’t do it for money. He does it because he thinks the stories are worth telling. And unlike when you watch something on Amazon, Netflix, or any other content provider you don’t have to pay $3.99 or $4.99 or whatever the cost of the episode or subscription for it. Well, you do pay for it, but not to Kirby. So his business model is simple - to make a decent living by giving people the best selection, at prices that won’t bankrupt anyone, and counting on those who understand the concept of his value proposition to decide to buy from him to keep the amazing content alive.
 

JustPullHarder

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2020
Messages
170
Reaction score
327
I met Kirby years ago in Florence, when he first went to the Pitti show with his wife. I have seen his journey and we have kept in touch. Likes and comments are great - Kirby’s production quality is in a league of its own. He spares no expense on content, his set, cameras, the attention to detail is outstanding and it speaks volumes to the respect he has for his audience and his guests, for the stories he shares with all those who watch. No one pays him for this. And those who think YouTube ads are making him tons of money have little notion of the way algorithms treat traditional content like his. He has never taken any “paid” sponsorships or sold out to the many “main stream” companies that have approached him to sell everything from shoes to watches to you name it. He has invited competitors on his channel because the guy truly believes in building a community of people who share an interest and a passion for what he brings to the table. He has never compromised the journey he believes his fellow “style” enthusiasts share with him for money. And he never will. Anyone could wrongly assume the man is wealthy or making a killing by having more “expensive” prices than cheaper companies, or by the way he dresses. I can tell you none of it has come for free. What people don’t know is that he created the direct to consumer bespoke hanger business in the US, he basically built the sapphire brand in the US via his content and all the promotion he did for them early on, which resulted in huge growth for the brand. At one point he was their Number one online seller. But brands get smart and they started to open more and more market. He has never been paid for any promotion done on shoe polish. Ever. Other companies use his content to attract buyers and undercut prices, and use certain products as loss leaders in order to gain market share, and this well may be the case. I won’t even speak about Amazon because no one can even validate what is sold there is not counterfeit. I stopped buying any edibles or products with ingredients from there a long time ago, after I saw all the counterfeit they carry (but that is another story) I am sure many people learn about brands from him, then buy from someone else. And that is fine. Use his content to make your life better. No one will care or blame you. Kirby’s true passion is sharing the journey. Just watch the Lobb video. Who does this?! The time, money and effort that it takes to produce stuff like this is mind boggling, if you consider that they guy is also running an online store. I have never been to an online store where the founder or anyone in their staff for that matter does ANYTHING for their customers other than maybe have mint videos to promote one of their products, or run sales, have marginally cheaper prices, or run phony campaigns with cheesy Instagrammers who are selling out for free product. He does so many videos where all he is doing is sharing a story, helping brands and people transcend, with no purpose other than to share the story with the world.
He doesn’t live extravagantly or grandly. He is an average man who found an interest and turned into a way to make a living. His respect and appreciation for craftsmanship and artisans allows him to share the stories in a way truly no one has. He sells what he considers the highest quality at the best price he can possibly sell. He pays his employees well, is always available for any customer who ever calls, and delivers more value than any retailer who is ONLY selling you a product. A large part of his revenue goes back into production of more amazing content, so whoever is interested can sit back on a rainy afternoon, drink a scotch and feel transported to a new place and meet new people via his channel. He is giving a voice to brands, and he doesn’t do it for money. He does it because he thinks the stories are worth telling. And unlike when you watch something on Amazon, Netflix, or any other content provider you don’t have to pay $3.99 or $4.99 or whatever the cost of the episode or subscription for it. Well, you do pay for it, but not to Kirby. So his business model is simple - to make a decent living by giving people the best selection, at prices that won’t bankrupt anyone, and counting on those who understand the concept of his value proposition to decide to buy from him to keep the amazing content alive.
It's entirely his choice to buy expensive production equipment. It's a loss leader and I'm sure there are significant tax write offs for the equipment if not the apparel he showcases. You're right though that the ad revenue would be marginal at best.

The fact that he's not directly selling a product with each video doesn't mean they don't have commercial value.

I would say that the videos are a good bit of advertising and also allows him to stroke his own ego and live the life he aspires to. Nothing wrong with that though.
 

Nobilis Animus

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
1,731
Reaction score
1,293
I enjoy informative Youtube videos as much as anyone, and yes it would be odd to criticise someone for their pricing/image on that account, were it not for the fact that those videos are already free. The only incredulity I hold towards these sorts of things is exactly when these bloggers/influencers start inventing rules for their followers, or aspiring to a life they wouldn't lead without their collaborations/product sales.

To be honest, I actually like some of his videos that showcase good shops. That sort of thing is helpful to those who want more information or need guidance. It's the: 'here are the rules of #manswear and just follow ABCD and you'll be well-dressed' that I dislike. Especially when that person purports to know all this on the basis of some kind of classic rules. The people who invented those Society-fashions - only really 'rules' to outsiders - might decide tomorrow that suits are banal, or to wear boots with everything like they did in the 19th century. Regency-chic is actually growing in popularity. The much-interviewed Flusser is wearing elasticated trousers.

We could all benefit from a good dose of common sense and perspective on what dressing well really means. Then we might be able to make and enjoy videos like these without either fetishising the rules or worrying over our buttonholes. This is what's actually happening among the well-heeled today, should you care: things are far more 'city' and less 'country.' Tailored clothes and fancy wear are more common for men and women, but not worn as rigidly as the rules would have you believe. Dress trousers and well-cut suit/leather jackets to a social occasion - where the iGent is likely to show up in tweeds/'workwear' and generally look out of place. People are having fun. Only in the #manswear corner of the internet do evening clothes and suits assume a kind of totemic aspect that never evolves for the individual.
 

Yones32

New Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2021
Messages
3
Reaction score
5
I enjoy informative Youtube videos as much as anyone, and yes it would be odd to criticise someone for their pricing/image on that account, were it not for the fact that those videos are already free. The only incredulity I hold towards these sorts of things is exactly when these bloggers/influencers start inventing rules for their followers, or aspiring to a life they wouldn't lead without their collaborations/product sales.

To be honest, I actually like some of his videos that showcase good shops. That sort of thing is helpful to those who want more information or need guidance. It's the: 'here are the rules of #manswear and just follow ABCD and you'll be well-dressed' that I dislike. Especially when that person purports to know all this on the basis of some kind of classic rules. The people who invented those Society-fashions - only really 'rules' to outsiders - might decide tomorrow that suits are banal, or to wear boots with everything like they did in the 19th century. Regency-chic is actually growing in popularity. The much-interviewed Flusser is wearing elasticated trousers.

We could all benefit from a good dose of common sense and perspective on what dressing well really means. Then we might be able to make and enjoy videos like these without either fetishising the rules or worrying over our buttonholes. This is what's actually happening among the well-heeled today, should you care: things are far more 'city' and less 'country.' Tailored clothes and fancy wear are more common for men and women, but not worn as rigidly as the rules would have you believe. Dress trousers and well-cut suit/leather jackets to a social occasion - where the iGent is likely to show up in tweeds/'workwear' and generally look out of place. People are having fun. Only in the #manswear corner of the internet do evening clothes and suits assume a kind of totemic aspect that never evolves for the individual.
It's entirely his choice to buy expensive production equipment. It's a loss leader and I'm sure there are significant tax write offs for the equipment if not the apparel he showcases. You're right though that the ad revenue would be marginal at best.

The fact that he's not directly selling a product with each video doesn't mean they don't have commercial value.

I would say that the videos are a good bit of advertising and also allows him to stroke his own ego and live the life he aspires to. Nothing wrong with that though.
The amount of content with commercial value and no purpose is overwhelming though. And I hope hope everyone’s profession or line of business allows them at best to live the life they aspire to, with some sort of meaning.
 

comrade

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 10, 2005
Messages
7,306
Reaction score
930
Don't forget, The Prince is at its foundation about creating a republic (according to Rousseau). So the highest would be Republic Grade.
In Machiavelli's time the Republic of Venice had already been in existence about 700 years.
For much of that time it was a leading Mediterranean and Adriatic naval and commercial
power. It was essentially a commercial oligarchy governed by A Doge (Duke) and an
hereditary Senate. Not democratic in our sense of the term.

 

othertravel

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2011
Messages
8,583
Reaction score
2,646
In Machiavelli's time the Republic of Venice had already been in existence about 700 years.
For much of that time it was a leading Mediterranean and Adriatic naval and commercial
power. It was essentially a commercial oligarchy governed by A Doge (Duke) and an
hereditary Senate. Not democratic in our sense of the term.

Exactly. It had the form of current/modern democratic republics, but was closer to the Roman republic in terms of its functions/suffrage.
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

Favorite knitwear under jackets/sport coats

  • Crewneck sweater

  • Turtleneck sweater

  • Long-sleeve polo

  • Vest

  • I don't like knitwear worn with jackets/sport coats


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
454,819
Messages
9,852,598
Members
205,491
Latest member
johnnyOGL
Top