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What is Bologna Construction?

jcusey

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You can see a diagram on the Santoni website. Be warned that the site is Flash (ugh). Anyway, once you get past the intro, click on "About Santoni", then on "Construction", then on "Bologna".

In Bologna construction, the upper is folded back upon itself and sewn into a sort of tube before it it put onto the last. After lasting, a soft insole is inserted, and the upper construction is stitched to the outsole in a manner similar to Blake construction (ie, the stitching will appear on the inside of the shoe). The resulting shoe, if it is done well, is slim and very flexible. Testoni is known for their Bologna construction, and lots of other Italian makers (including Santoni and Gravati) use it on some of their shoes, too.
 

Roger

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Originally Posted by poorsod
http://www.stijlforum.nl/viewtopic.php?t=78
Now if only the Norwegians had translated the Japanese. . .

Yeah...had the same thoughts, but it's the best pictorial description I've seen on the various kinds of construction. What you have to do is make up a legend once you've figured out the symbols! BTW, for those of you who didn't know (and that may be nobody), "McKay" construction is what we often refer to as "Blake" construction.

Jcusey, what advantages do you see for Bolognese construction over Blake? In the diagram referred to, there is no structure referred to specifically as an insole in the Bolognese version, although one would suspect that the extension that is stitched to the sock would be the equivalent. Could the flexibility to which you refer be due to the fact that the maker employs something thinner than a standard insole (the stitched extension to the sock in the diagram, and what you refer to as a "soft insole")? It would seem that one might feel every pebble and rock underfoot with Bolognese-constructed shoes!
 

Roger

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Originally Posted by Sartorially Challenged
So... can shoes with Bologna construction be resoled as easily as those with Goodyear welting?
My guess would be that they could not be easily resoled, given their construction, but, as is true with most of these technical shoe questions, we need to hear from Jcusey or Ron Rider. Where are you guys?
smile.gif
 

jcusey

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Originally Posted by Sartorially Challenged
So... can shoes with Bologna construction be resoled as easily as those with Goodyear welting?
I don't honestly know but given the correct machinery, I don't see why not.
 

jcusey

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Originally Posted by Roger
Yeah...had the same thoughts, but it's the best pictorial description I've seen on the various kinds of construction. What you have to do is make up a legend once you've figured out the symbols! BTW, for those of you who didn't know (and that may be nobody), "McKay" construction is what we often refer to as "Blake" construction.

As is Littleway.

Jcusey, what advantages do you see for Bolognese construction over Blake? In the diagram referred to, there is no structure referred to specifically as an insole in the Bolognese version, although one would suspect that the extension that is stitched to the sock would be the equivalent. Could the flexibility to which you refer be due to the fact that the maker employs something thinner than a standard insole (the stitched extension to the sock in the diagram, and what you refer to as a "soft insole")? It would seem that one might feel every pebble and rock underfoot with Bolognese-constructed shoes!
A Blake shoe will have a regular old stiff insole. A Bologna shoe will not. In addition, the interior stitching attaching the outsole will be closer to the edge of the upper in a Bologna shoe than in a Blake one, making the stitching less uncomfortable against one's toes.
 

RIDER

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Bologna construction is what we call 'bag' construction...simply means that the upper assembly is made complete before the last is inserted. There is no insole, therefore is very flexible. It is easy to resole; any repair shop with a McKay will work, although few stock pre-flex outsoles, so will probably be stiffer.

There are many different ways to make a single 'construction'....few are standard. For example, we make a Blake construction that is every bit as flexible as Bologna by simply eliminating the mid-sole, using a pre-flexed, soft insole and using Piper (soft calf) uppers. Any manufacturer can do this.

The Japanese site is very good in regards to the diagrams...I like the fact that they differentiate between 'Norwegian' and 'Norvegese' by showing an insole with a nib and a heavier insole that is stitched directly, and calling them different constructions. Of course, you never know which method a manufacturer will use.

Really, we can 'label' a construction anything we want....it's sort of like size - it's whatever we say it is. For example, the Santoni site describes 'Goodyear' like no other I know. Most would call this 'Norwegian'. I have never seen Goodyear where the upper is turned out, and a defining characteristic of all Goodyear constructions (whether hand or machine) is the 'hidden' stitch tying the welt to the upper assembly. In the Santoni diagram there is no welt!

For a better understanding of how these machines are used, look at this website and you can see how a manufacturer can choose options of a particular machine to make a type of shoe they wish to produce.

http://www.zism.cz/index.php?doc=174...TED%20FOOTWEAR
 

Sartorially Challenged

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Sorry to resurrect an older thread, but I have a follow-up question: why do some folks consider Goodyear-welted shoes to be better contructed than Bologna- or Blake-constructed?
 

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